#1
I've noticed that any time I pluck the E string, the B starts to vibrate and it makes the most annoying sound. It's a very annoying echo, and like i said, annoying. Also when I just pluck the B string, then mute it the sound still goes through the guitar. Same annoying hum. I'm using Ernie Ball Super Slinkys. Custom Gauge I guess... I found them in my dadd room. It says theyre acoustic and electric strings. I think that an electric string may have gotten mixed in with the bunch. I'm not sure. So anyway, is there something wrong with the guitar or is it the string?
#2
your not supposed to put electric guitar strings on an acoustic guitar. that might be your problem.
#3
I know that, i gues it is. It sucks when those are the only strings I have. Rawr!! I have no money, not even enough for strings x.x
#4
One it may be just something with acoustics period. I can't remember the word for it though. BUT it basically just says that when you play a string the vibrations cause another string to vibrate. I like the effect personally but I guess it is a double edged sword.

Also, electric strings wont work well at all. How about you just get new strings. Ask around for some money. Have you tried asking your dad for enough money to buy a cheap pack of strings...you can get a cheap pack for like Five dollars...
#5
if you mute it then the sound still goes on, it only means that at the bridge pin, the end of your string is not tightly stuck..i mean there's still a short excess of the string.. do you get what i mean?.. so when you mute it, that short excess still vibrates producing the sound..

there should be no problem putting electric guitar strings to your acoustic except that it would make your guitar sound too bright and trby (due to a thinner gauge) and it might eat up your fret wires..

try to restring your guitar and befor you rotate the tuning machines, pull your strings first near the bridge pin to make sure they're tightly stuck below it.. then tune it..

keep rockin! \m/
Gear:

PRS SE Standard
Ibanez AEG8E-NT w/ Seymour Duncan Woody SC
Yupangco Classical Guitar
Korg AX5G
Marshall MG50DFX
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#6
Quote by deltacross
if you mute it then the sound still goes on, it only means that at the bridge pin, the end of your string is not tightly stuck..i mean there's still a short excess of the string.. do you get what i mean?.. so when you mute it, that short excess still vibrates producing the sound..


If you're referring to the small amount of string between the bridge pin and the saddle, forget it. There isn't enough string there to maintain any vibrations, much less sustain (ringing on). Not tightly stuck? Whatever...just go back and re-read the TS's original post. You obviously missed the critical point of what he was asking.

Look people, it's really very simple. I've tried to explain this phenomenon before, aparently with little success since you guys still aren't getting it. I'll try again.
When a guitar is in tune, is intonated properly and everything's right with the world, when you pluck a string, say the low E, it vibrates right? What note does it produce? E right? Yes, AND....and this is the part the makes a lot of you guys think there's something wrong with the guitar. The string is also producing other notes along it's length. At the 12th, 7th, 5th, 4th and so on frets, the vibrating string is producing notes that coincides with other strings, and is starting them to vibrating, all by themselves it seems. These harmonic notes are normal, natural, and can't be avoided, apart from muting. Want to demonstrate what I mean easily? Put your acoustic, tuned to standard just for the sake of ease of this demo, in front of a stereo speaker and play some songs thru the stereo. While the music is playing, touch any of the strings at random. What are they doing? Just sitting there lifeless? No, they're vibrating right. How can this be, since you didn't pluck any of them, they shouldn't be vibrating should they? Of course they should be. The soundwaves from the stereo speaker is what's causing it, and the closer the notes from the speaker are to what your guitar is tuned to, the more they will do it. There are some terms that go along with this. A few of them are: resonance, intervals, pure intervals, harmonic intervals. A little research goes a long way.
A little side note along these same lines. If this was a bad thing that happens to acoustic guitars, no one would have ever invented the 12 string with those octave strings. This is a big part of what makes them sound so awesome.
Last edited by LeftyDave at Jun 9, 2008,
#8
^ That's the term I was hunting for earlier. Pays to have a tad bit more coffee before I sit down to the pc I guess.