#1
hey everyone, new user here. i have a very basic question that i need some help with!

i work in the studio a lot, and switching between amp heads and cabs is a very frequent thing. someone recently brought to my attention that their marshall amp manual said to never power on an amplifier without it being connected to a loudspeaker. my question is this - does that apply to "standby" mode as well? we like to move quickly in the studio, and letting tubes warm up and cool down on standby mode, while we already switched the speaker cable to another amp head is a common thing - is this bad for our amps?

any info is greatly appreciated! thanks so much.
#2
wow. great question i guess. i'm sorry but i am not qualified to answer this question so if anything it is a bump for ya.

all i know is that you should not power on a amp head without it being plugged into a speaker. if it is on standby, the tubes are technically still drawing some power right, to keep them 'warm'? soooo, my guess is that this is a bad idea.

i wondering tho if an attenuator with rotor/motor would help in your situation to offload the power 'load' to something while you make the swap.

http://www.tedweber.com/atten.htm

again, i'm out of my league here so maybe someone else can chime in.

#3
Quote by destiny brandon
hey everyone, new user here. i have a very basic question that i need some help with!

i work in the studio a lot, and switching between amp heads and cabs is a very frequent thing. someone recently brought to my attention that their marshall amp manual said to never power on an amplifier without it being connected to a loudspeaker. my question is this - does that apply to "standby" mode as well? we like to move quickly in the studio, and letting tubes warm up and cool down on standby mode, while we already switched the speaker cable to another amp head is a common thing - is this bad for our amps?

any info is greatly appreciated! thanks so much.


It won't matter if it's just on standby. All that does is turn on the heaters for the valves. I like to think of the standby switch as the radiator switch.*

*Disclaimer: I believe this to be true, but I can't say for sure. You would be better off asking a qualified amp tech.
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