#1
I've been playing for 3-4 year for now, but I am probably quite a bit behind most people that have played this long, probably because of lack of formal training.

I've come to the point where I feel I can't learn new songs, and if I try them I can't really play them because of fast sections, or complicated solos, and I can't seem to get more complicated patterns down. Eg. I'm trying to play the Long Road to Ruin Solo, by the Foo Fighters, and I can do the first small part, but then there is a lick of 16th notes, based on the C chord, which sounds great, however I can't even come close to making it sound good. Also my legato is terrible, and sometimes I can have problems making notes/chords sound clear. Yes, my equipment is probably nothing amazing, but I probably don't help it much.

So after all that ranting, I am sincerely asking for some advice, because I love playing the guitar, and I really want to progress as an artist. I don't this for anyone else, I've never played in front of other people, I do this for me and no one else, and it brings me immense satisfaction, so please help out a needy guitarist!
#2
You've reached the point where you want to play difficult music. The key word is "difficult." The songs are hard and you should expect to work hard and potentially painfully slow to play them correctly.

There is no getting around practice. Ever.

Specific practice tips can be provided upon request.
#3
Quote by harelo
I've been playing for 3-4 year for now, but I am probably quite a bit behind most people that have played this long, probably because of lack of formal training.

I've come to the point where I feel I can't learn new songs, and if I try them I can't really play them because of fast sections, or complicated solos, and I can't seem to get more complicated patterns down. Eg. I'm trying to play the Long Road to Ruin Solo, by the Foo Fighters, and I can do the first small part, but then there is a lick of 16th notes, based on the C chord, which sounds great, however I can't even come close to making it sound good. Also my legato is terrible, and sometimes I can have problems making notes/chords sound clear. Yes, my equipment is probably nothing amazing, but I probably don't help it much.

So after all that ranting, I am sincerely asking for some advice, because I love playing the guitar, and I really want to progress as an artist. I don't this for anyone else, I've never played in front of other people, I do this for me and no one else, and it brings me immense satisfaction, so please help out a needy guitarist!


Well 1st of all, you said you love playing guitar. Thats good because if you love it you will likely find success. Its a simple of matter of figuring out what your goals are, making a plan to achieve it, and executing the plan.

getting a teacher may help. I've had many different teachers, and I learned alot from every one ..... even the few that weren't that great..... its always been worth it. A good teacher can help you focus your efforts.
#4
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You've reached the point where you want to play difficult music. The key word is "difficult." The songs are hard and you should expect to work hard and potentially painfully slow to play them correctly.

There is no getting around practice. Ever.

Specific practice tips can be provided upon request.



That is my problem, practice happens, improvement doesn't, I would love some help, and specific tips, please.

Maybe I can play well and get some more vagingo :P god I love scrubs
Last edited by harelo at Jun 8, 2008,
#5
bangoodcharlote is right, start slow, work up your speed and over time things will sound a lot better than if you just launch into it at full speed. Example: Tamacun by Rodrigo y Gabriela. I tried playing it and thought, there's no way i'll even be able to play the main riff it's just all over the place and too fast. But i started very slowly, about 1/4 of the actual tempo, and learnt a bar at a time, speeding each one up until i could play it properly at full speed. Then I just had to memorize it, and after about 4 hours of work, I could play about 1min 30 of the song.
Seems like a lot of work, and I never ever bothered to learn the solo, but it impresses people when you go "play Am, G, C & E really quickly like this" then bust out this awesome mexican jazz piece.
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#6
That much is true, I guess I have to REALLY slow things down.

and GuitarMunky, a teacher is out of the question, I just can't afford it.
#7
Quote by harelo
That is my problem, practice happens, improvement doesn't, I would love some help, and specific tips, please.

Maybe I can play well and get some more vagingo :P god I love scrubs


Trust me, you will be improving, just at a barely noticeable rate, so that you won't actually realise you've gotten better, until you listen to yourself playing a year ago and saying 'woah that was **** i can do way better'
I mean, i thought i hadn't improved at all this year from last year, and i was doing all sorts of scale and speed excersizes and i thought it was a waste of time. Then i jammed out a song with my band and when it came to the solo i played the fastest (not shred) most insane solo ive ever done in my life and my band was like "woah what was that?"
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#8
You feel as if you're behind in your learning but generally your either a head or even with most people. Remember that a lot of people who pick up guitar for a long time aren't serious about it and still 'suck' at the 5 year mark.

I've been playing for four years and I'm kind of in the same boat as you. You have to realise that if you want to learn a harder song, you have to really work on it. Get guitar pro and find the tab of the song you want. Get to the hard section and halve the tempo. Learn it at a really slow speed. Then move onto the next bar of the hard part.

Once you get the hard part down at a slow speed, pick up the pace. go from halve the speed to 75%. Learn it there. Keep doing this process and eventually you can play it.

just remember, practice, Practice, PRACTICE!
For those who care.
Current Gear
Cort Zenox Z42
Flextone II
Charvel USA So-Cal
Farida M2 Parlour Acoustic
Admira Hand-built Spanish Acoustic
Blackstar HT-5H
Line 6 M13
#9
Druz, would you mind sharing some of those excersizes and scales you like to use?

I could definetly get some new ones to spice up my practice


and Darkness, great Idea, I've had GP5 all this time and never thought of that! (and for some reason the RSE in GP sounds really weird after the update I did, I dunno what the hell is up with that :S)
#10
Quote by harelo
Druz, would you mind sharing some of those excersizes and scales you like to use?

I could definetly get some new ones to spice up my practice


and Darkness, great Idea, I've had GP5 all this time and never thought of that! (and for some reason the RSE in GP sounds really weird after the update I did, I dunno what the hell is up with that :S)


I really liked the old RSE aswell.

Theres an option that will allow you to easily slow down or speed up the song without actually changing the tempo value. Use this as its much easier then phisically changing the tempo.

Pro tip: Its the x 0.50


Edit: get a hold of some good videos. I personally really like John Petruccis' Rock discipline. Follow those exercises. As for theory http://www.musictheory.net/ is the single greatest website i have come across for learning theory.
For those who care.
Current Gear
Cort Zenox Z42
Flextone II
Charvel USA So-Cal
Farida M2 Parlour Acoustic
Admira Hand-built Spanish Acoustic
Blackstar HT-5H
Line 6 M13
Last edited by .:Darkness:. at Jun 8, 2008,
#11
Oh yeah I've gotten quite good at using GP5 so I know how to use most of its functions (for some reason I still get some incomplete bars here and there when I'm sure they aren't, but whatever).

I guess I just need to find new excercises for to just build up my speed and hopefuly clarity of notes, anyone have any good ones?

And by the way thank you to all for the help and encouraging words.
#12
In addition to the practicing advice, I always listen to my favorite players before I practice so I'm in the right mindset. A song I'm listening to endlessly and have been playing and learning endlessly as of now is here:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=855723&page=1&pp=20

That always helps to motivate me to practice more than I usually would.
#13
Quote by harelo
Druz, would you mind sharing some of those excersizes and scales you like to use?

I could definetly get some new ones to spice up my practice


and Darkness, great Idea, I've had GP5 all this time and never thought of that! (and for some reason the RSE in GP sounds really weird after the update I did, I dunno what the hell is up with that :S)


Well things like playing the aeolian, myxolydian, ionian and other modes starting from A on the 6th string to a metronome at about 60bpm. Play one note of the scale per beat (1/4 notes) up and done the scale, then at 1/8 notes (two notes every beat) then 16ths and finally triplet 8ths and 16ths. When you feel comfortable doing triplet 16ths at 60bpm for all the scales, move it up the fret or down and try it again. When you have mastered one tempo up it to 65 or 70 bpm. Practise this for just 10 min a night then set yourself a goal, maybe to be able to do it at 95 bpm by the end of the month and 120bpm by the end of the year or whatever. Then when you go back and try and play a song you found difficult because of speed reasons, you should find much easier
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#14
I've never quite understood the concept of triplets, mind enlightening me?
#15
Quote by harelo
I've never quite understood the concept of triplets, mind enlightening me?
8th note triplets is when you play 3 even notes in the time of 2 8th notes.

16th note triplets is when you play 3 even notes in the time of 2 16th notes.

Quarter-note note triplets is when you play 3 even notes in the time of 2 quarter notes.


Seeing the pattern?????
#16
Quote by harelo
I've never quite understood the concept of triplets, mind enlightening me?

A triplet (there are many other tuplets which function differently) reduces the notes to 2/3 of their original value; where two notes of a specific value fit normally, three are packed in and played evenly. The three notes occupy the same space as the two notes normally would; if you have a metronome, try playing two eighth notes over one beat and then playing a triplet of eighth notes across the next beat to highlight the relationship.

EDIT: I guess BGC just beat me, though.