#1
What would you call these chords? Quiz time. Bonus points: In what key is the progression?

---
-5-
-5-
-9-
-7-
---

----
-7--
-7--
-10-
-9--
----

----
-8--
-9--
-12-
-10-
----

----
-10-
-11-
-14-
-12-
----
#6
G major and E minor are the same thing ;-D

just kidding baby, you know i love you.


it's difficult to say whether its one or the other really. that last chord i would interpret as A6 minus the 3rd, leaving it ambiguous in tone. and that would seem to suggest E minor in that case.
#7
The piece is A tonal, an effect often achieved by Stravinsky
#9
I would guess this:

E7sus2
F#dim
G6
A6

But I could be completely wrong, though. And I also think the key is E minor.
#12
Quote by branny1982
he said A tonal not atonal.


do you really thiink that a piece having a tonal centre of A would be an "effect often achieved my Stravinsky" ? seriously?
#14
Stravinsky is extremely well known for atonal music. i won't say he was the first classical composer to use it but he was definitely a big proponent of atonal classical music. i'm quite sure that when ror stated that the piece was A Tonal that he meant atonal. if i'm wrong then i'm sorry. and i didn't mean to offend you.

a piece's being A tonal would mean that it had a key centre of A, what the statement lacks is the quality of the tonal centre, i.e. whether it is major or minor. for that reason i figure that when he says A tonal he is simply saying atonal.
#16
what's way fun is if you try to compose something that is atonal. bloody difficult.

EDIT: try to compose something and have it actually sound decent and not just a bunch of random notes.
#19
I think the term you are searching for is Polytonal. Atonality suggest the piece has no specified tone. Polytonality suggests the piece has many different keys, often played simultaneously. And the progression is... E Minor. The actual piece plays it in Bb Minor. It's a noodle scratcher.

Edit: Ummm. Oh sh!t... I think the actual piece might be in Eb Minor. You Bastids are confusing me!
Last edited by Phobos&Deimos at Jun 9, 2008,
#20
Quote by Phobos&Deimos
I think the term you are searching for is Polytonal. Atonality suggest the piece has no specified tone. Polytonality suggests the piece has many different keys, often played simultaneously.
I was thinking...

isnt atonal that sort of music schoenberg wrote? Where the musics tonality didnt point more towards minor or major?
Cause that music there is anything but atonal in the way schoenberg did it.