#1
I've finally gotten over myself and have decided to put down the tabs and learn to read music. I have a good understanding of notation and some theory because I did a year of clarinet and a year of piano in school, but i need to transfer my knowledge to guitar. I've memorized all the notes and am working on scales but I still need to start reeeeaaaddding these damn notes so..my main schpeel

1. What is a good website for sheet music, not tabs.

2. Any other pointers/things to be sure to learn
Quote by Chikitty_China
Well, when I'm fapping, I sometimes look at my left hand and wonder what could have been ....
#2
its actually very hard to find free sheet music on the internet....there are too many copyright laws, which is completely opposite of finding guitar tabs literally everywhere on the internet

if you want to get sheet music i recomend just buying like an instructional guitar book from the local music store (i.e. essential elements, learn to play guitar, somethin like that)

idk about ur other question, lol
Whether I am a hungry rabbit or a frightened carrot, my home is the same.
#3
I'm planning on doing this too. Here's what I'ma do:

Since I'm a violinist also I'm going to learn how to play my old violin stuff on the guitar because it translates over extremely well and it's very easy. It just gets you more accustomed to it all and it sounds good. (I'm talking basic basic Suzuki books here)

Also, I heard there are books where they take the parts of each hand, split them up, and put them both in the same clef so that two guitars can duet w/ the two halves. I'm going to get one of those and get my friend to buy one also so we can both get used to it. If you have any guitarist friends, I reccomend you do this.

Hope that helps to some degree...

EDIT: And by the way, after I saw that guy's post above mine on finding sheet music, I reccomend musicnotes.com for getting sheet music. It's not free, but it's nice to be able to just pay for a piece and then print it. It's cheap too.
#4
I'm not sure about a site that has sheet music, but it's awesomely better to go out and buy it yourself. That way, you can make markings on it, which will automatically help you focus on the parts you need focusing on.
Way back when I first started, I took a blank piece of staff paper, and wrote the names of the notes and where they belonged. I would then take my instrument, and as I looked at the note's letter, not the actual note symbol, I played it.
Next, I wrote down the actual note symbol, but still wrote the letter of the note next to it.
Then I erased the letter, and just played with the note symbol.
Eventually, I taught myself keys.
Start yourself out with C and F sharp.
Keep adding sharps for different keys.
Then move to flats. Such as E flat, B flat, A flat, D flat, and so on.
If you need more help, ask!
Quote by leeb rocks
SO I'VE BEEN BALLS DEEP IN MYSELF THIS WHOLE TlME?!?!
#5
yeah, i started out with the circle of fifths last year in school, i've forgotten most of knowledge towards it htough
Quote by Chikitty_China
Well, when I'm fapping, I sometimes look at my left hand and wonder what could have been ....
#6
Quote by guitarfan93
yeah, i started out with the circle of fifths last year in school, i've forgotten most of knowledge towards it htough



you might wanna relearn that...

btw, you're the first guy on here who I've seen write "Memphrica" anywhere
#8
Anyone who needs any help at all can come to me.
I don't mind helping at all, because in the long run, we BOTH end up strengthening ourselves.
Feel free to PM me, or post on here, and I will return quickly.
Quote by leeb rocks
SO I'VE BEEN BALLS DEEP IN MYSELF THIS WHOLE TlME?!?!
#10
Quote by guitarfan93
1. What is a good website for sheet music, not tabs.
At risk of being banned, try to find a jazz fake book (you can download them with torrents). Some of those melodies are very simple and very fun. Dont worry about including chords in the melodies, like those show-offs on You-tube do, as of yet. Fake books might be hard to find, as they are completely illegal (except the newest "real book"), which is why I'm going to be banned.
Quote by guitarfan93
2. Any other pointers/things to be sure to learn
Check out guitar_theory's sig. It also depends on what you know already, as in if you know your fretboard the first option I suggested will work better but if you improvise alot and know your intervals, the second option will work better (at least it did for me).

I've heard some guys say that the best way to go is to learn all the notes of the fretboard and all the notes of the musical staff. But this defeats the purpose of the guitar, we can improvise/write using shapes and we can think in intervals (instead of notes AND THAN intervals like every other instrument).
Personally, I only know the first 4 strings and the last string (high E). I get lost with at the B string.

But if your fairly good at shapes and intervals (like me), you might want to pick a couple major/minor scale shapes (preferably the same ones as the songs key) and use scale degrees.
If the note on the staff line is one space higher (say E to F), than you know the next note is one scale degree higher (E is the 3rd degree of C major F is the fourth degree), so you can follow your shape and play the next note in the shape. If its 2 spaces higher (E to G), than you play two scale degrees higher (G is the fifth degree) and so on.
This way, you only need to figure out the first note of the melody. But, if you get one note wrong, you will most likely get the whole song wrong.
Take what I've said with a grain of salt, though. I've only just started to read without using the slow process of "Every good boy deserves fruit" and FACE.
#12
Quote by eds1275
I'm planning on doing this too. Here's what I'ma do:

Since I'm a violinist also I'm going to learn how to play my old violin stuff on the guitar because it translates over extremely well and it's very easy. It just gets you more accustomed to it all and it sounds good. (I'm talking basic basic Suzuki books here)


It's excellent practice to read from other instruments, but you should make sure that you're not just using your ear to play your old pieces. That's the problem when you have already heard the music. The best thing to do when you're sightreading is to get a random piece that you've never heard so that you don't depend on your ear while reading it.
Quote by guitar_god22

thats about south africa tho...which isnt poor at all.
Quote by RyanInChains9
yea venezula is just the richest country in the world...
#13
if you get guitar pro, then any of the tabs you find for that, which are plenty on this website, include both tab and standard notation, and you can select to not display tab i think

GUITAR PRO
Quote by Shred Head
You have an atrocious sense of humour!

Quote by StrayCatBlues
You win 100 hilarity points.

Spend them wisely.


Quote by GrisKy
you're a funny, funny man, chimp in a tux... funny indeed.
#14
Quote by chimpinatux
if you get guitar pro, then any of the tabs you find for that, which are plenty on this website, include both tab and standard notation, and you can select to not display tab i think

GUITAR PRO


+1 exactly what I was thinking.

The only disadvantage of sheet music is the fact that you don't really know what position to play in.
#15
Quote by guitarfan93
I've finally gotten over myself and have decided to put down the tabs and learn to read music. I have a good understanding of notation and some theory because I did a year of clarinet and a year of piano in school, but i need to transfer my knowledge to guitar. I've memorized all the notes and am working on scales but I still need to start reeeeaaaddding these damn notes so..my main schpeel

1. What is a good website for sheet music, not tabs.

2. Any other pointers/things to be sure to learn



if you want to get better at reading, try a good method book. Learning to read music is like learning to read a new language. You have to start simple and then gradually work towards being fluent in the language. So I wouldn't "give up tabs" just yet because most of what you get from tabs is beyond the level of a beginning reader. Your not just going to switch to standard notation all of the sudden, its not that easy.
shred is gaudy music
#16
If you want to learn how to read standard notation then i would suggest not spending your time on the internet trying to find a website to learn it of (i've seen lots of friends try and learn through the internet and fail) but going to a music shop and buying a beginners, probably classical, guitar book.

Then just practise these pieces/exercises till you've got all the notes down, if it's a good book and you practise then it shouldn't take you long. The main challenge of reading standard notation is not the notes, it's the rythm. Rythm is hard because it can, and will, always get more complicated. When you start it might be all crotchets, later on it's semi quavers and triplet, later than that it's dotted demi-semi quavers and a hemi-demi-semi quaver or a double dotted semi quaver etc.

A lot of people search around for ages for short cuts or easier methods when they would have got much further just learning.

Just remember, learning to read music doesn't really stop, and it's not something like a technique that you learn for a month then will have mastered. Don't stop learning once you know all the notes because the better you are at reading the rythms in standard notation, the better you will be at sight reading.

12345abcd3
#17
Ok, here's a tip:
Find/buy the sheet music of some guitar openings you like. Something of the sorts of Guns N' Roses' Sweet Child o' Mine or Metallica's Nothing Else Matters. Just the intro's are enough for starters.

Write the note letters above the staff. Now listen to the intro a couple of times and, when you're ready, sing the letters out loud. This is important: you have to hear yourself sing the letters. It will help you assocate the notes to the tones. Sing slowly at first. Try to keep tempo later.

If you repeat this once or twice every day, you'll know them by heart before you realize it. And I think it will help you improve on relative pitch (if such might interest you). At some point, erase the letters and keep singing the parts every day.

Try to sing in the morning. Your mind is free of sound then and you'll remember easier. It doesn't have to take long. You'll learn by repetition.

Oh, and make sure your little sister doesn't hear you. Singing letters gives a bad impression.
#18
Quote by GuitarMunky
if you want to get better at reading, try a good method book. Learning to read music is like learning to read a new language. You have to start simple and then gradually work towards being fluent in the language. So I wouldn't "give up tabs" just yet because most of what you get from tabs is beyond the level of a beginning reader. Your not just going to switch to standard notation all of the sudden, its not that easy.


I have to disagree with you here. I would completely give up tabs and concentrate on learning standard notation. If you continue reading tabs you will always use them as a crutch when you struggle with learning standard notation. I think its best to concentarte your energy on learning to read music, it can be challenging but the rewards are worth it. Personally I started with tabs and then I switched to music notation exclusively, after one year of reading music my playing and understanding of the guitar improved tremendously.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#19
Quote by michal23

The only disadvantage of sheet music is the fact that you don't really know what position to play in.



Lies.

You get to the point where you can just glance at a piece and know exactly what the best position is. It's part of the skill. Granted it's a more advanced part, but I know I can just look at a page of music and know where it will generally work out best.
#20
my situation i guess, is similar to this. I played cello for 4 years, and i learned the bass clef by heart, and new almost all the notes on the fingerboard of the cello...But then in my music class, i switched sections from cello to guitar. However, i can't read music on the treble clef, I don't know ALL of my chords, and i don't know all the notes on the fretboard of guitar. I feel like i suck, but i'm good at playing. (a lot less skilled than the guy that started this post) I feel stuck. How can i improve myself?
#21
Quote by michal23
+1 exactly what I was thinking.

The only disadvantage of sheet music is the fact that you don't really know what position to play in.
Almost true, but normally not.

Sure sheet-music doesnt spoon feed you like tabs (come on tab lovers, you know tabs are ridiculously easy), but if your just playing easy single note melodys than it really doesnt matter what position your playing in.

Also, guitar_theory, could you critique the way I read music? I sort of worked it out myself and would like to know if there was a better way. Other than working out every single note on the fretboard and the musical staff...

Quote by one vision
Why are they illegal??
Copy right issues. The first publishers of the fake books didnt pay royalties to the composers.
This is why giving links to them, maybe suggesting to download them and having them is illegal.
#22
Quote by demonofthenight
At risk of being banned, try to find a jazz fake book (you can download them with torrents). Some of those melodies are very simple and very fun. Dont worry about including chords in the melodies, like those show-offs on You-tube do, as of yet. Fake books might be hard to find, as they are completely illegal (except the newest "real book"), which is why I'm going to be banned


Overreact much?
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#24
Quote by Resiliance
Overreact much?
The first time I got banned it was for the most menial things

And I've seen you and the other mod of the jazz forum threaten to ban a guy for asking for links to fake books.
#25
Quote by demonofthenight
The first time I got banned it was for the most menial things


Actually, the first time you got banned was for two accounts of very blatant spam.

Quote by demonofthenight
The first time I got banned it was for the most menial things

And I've seen you and the other mod of the jazz forum threaten to ban a guy for asking for links to fake books.


No you haven't.

Posting links to one is another matter, though, can't have UG liable for piracy and all that jazz.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#26
Quote by Resiliance
Actually, the first time you got banned was for two accounts of very blatant spam.
As opposed to half the noob posters on MT?

And if I remember it was once for spam and another time for posting in a reported thread. Anyway, if I wanted to complain and whinge about what I got banned for I would have done so in the forum of the banned.

Anyway, back on topic...
Is it okay when I'm sight reading to play the peice really slow?

EDIT: and dont check on me using your mod super powers. It feels weird...
Last edited by demonofthenight at Jun 10, 2008,
#27
Quote by demonofthenight
As opposed to half the noob posters on MT?

And if I remember it was once for spam and another time for posting in a reported thread. Anyway, if I wanted to complain and whinge about what I got banned for I would have done so in the forum of the banned.

Anyway, back on topic...
Is it okay when I'm sight reading to play the peice really slow?

EDIT: and dont check on me using your mod super powers. It feels weird...


Theres no problem with playing the piece really slow, play it as slow as you need to, speed will come with time and practice.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#28
The most important thing to do when leaning to read is to make sure that you learn a piece completely by only the sheet music. No recordings, no tabs, just the sheet. And not only must you learn it entirely but you must refine it from just the sheet music. It is also important to know when a piece is too hard for you to learn. Generally my only criteria for this is if you are unable to make musical sense of it (especially if you've heard it before and are still unable to make sense of it) then it is too hard. Also, avoid swimming, or drowning, in music. It's okay to read as much as you like, but make sure you are actually learning and refining a number of the pieces to performance level.
#29
I played trumpet in high school and could read the music but i cant read much for guitar as well.

www.musictheory.net has a flash card style quizzes for a variety of things like picking notes on the staff and key signatures and fret board note names. You might want to try refreshing with those.

Im sure you remember Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge and FACE from band class right? LOL.

Im meaning to relearn how to read the damn sheet music as well but im so ****in busy i just want to play when i have time. Oh well good luck man.
#31
Quote by demonofthenight


Also, guitar_theory, could you critique the way I read music? I sort of worked it out myself and would like to know if there was a better way. Other than working out every single note on the fretboard and the musical staff...


You're gonna have to explain your methodology to me in a bit of detail for me to critique anything.

One Vision: Fake books are pretty darn old. And there are so many legal ones anymore the illegal ones are falling by the wayside fast, except for those hard to find ones that people get on the internet anymore, like the Colorado Cookbook and such.
#32
Quote by Guitar_Theory
You're gonna have to explain your methodology to me in a bit of detail for me to critique anything.
I pick a scale shape. A simple major scale shape. I find the first note of the melody and I play it. Than if the next note is only one degree higher on the musical staff, I'd play the next note up (in pitch) in my shape. If the next note is say 4 degrees higher, I'd play 4 notes higher in my shape.

I basically follow a shape.
#34
I try to not think about shapes that much. One of my goals is to learn the entire fretboard well, so I'm trying to have a mental image of the notes in the current position that I'm playing. Well, not really an image, I just practice until my fingers know where the notes are. The best thing about knowing the notes on the fingerboard is that they never change. No matter what scale you're playing, f# will always be in the same places. I use scale patterns a lot when I do left hand exercises, but I try to avoid thinking about them when I read. But I'm only a beginner at reading music and I've been playing patterns for years not thinking a lot about the notes. And I also read quite slowly at the moment, but my speed is improving.

Demonofthenight, you're saying that you're looking for the first note and then you're reading the interval between the current and the next note, check this out :
http://www.adamnitti.com/site_reading.shtml
I know it's for bass players, but it's pretty close to what you're describing.
#35
Quote by dontstopblevin
its actually very hard to find free sheet music on the internet....there are too many copyright laws, which is completely opposite of finding guitar tabs literally everywhere on the internet

if you want to get sheet music i recomend just buying like an instructional guitar book from the local music store (i.e. essential elements, learn to play guitar, somethin like that)

idk about ur other question, lol



Dude are you serious? Have you ever googled sheetmusic? about 5-20 different FREE sources come up. Then you just print em off.....
My Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Standard | Gibson SG | Casio PG 380 | Dave Mustaine VMNT | Digitech Whammy | Carvin Legacy head |
Carvin V3 combo | MXR Custom Badass Overdrive | Dunlop Jerry Cantrell Wah | Rocktron Banshee | Ibanez PG Flanger
#36
Quote by demonofthenight
I pick a scale shape. A simple major scale shape. I find the first note of the melody and I play it. Than if the next note is only one degree higher on the musical staff, I'd play the next note up (in pitch) in my shape. If the next note is say 4 degrees higher, I'd play 4 notes higher in my shape.

I basically follow a shape.


That can work, but you'd have to make adjustments for accidentals.

I mean I probably end up doing the same thing, but i never think about it that's for sure. I don't think shapes much anymore. Once you get used to stuff you don't consider shapes anymore, you watch yourself play and you catch yourself using these shapes or pieces of multiple shapes but you never really think about it.