#1
I've been reading up on chord theory for a while now. Now that I now how chords are built I'm ready to start adding more chords into my repertoire.

What is the best way to start learning new chords?


Did you learn ever possible A chord, B chord C chord etc?

Or every major chord than every minor, diminished add9 etc?
#2
the best way to learn chords, in my opinion, is to learn songs and learn the chords that are needed for each new song. Its funner and easier then memorizing.
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#3
You'll find you really don't need to go about "learning new chords". Knowing how to construct them is pretty much all you'll need. Not necessarily want, but need.

You'll also find that most chord shapes will work for the specific sound your looking for.

If you want to learn different chords, just imo experiment more than learn in a text book matter.

Hope that comes across the way I mean it.
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#4
Learn how to construct chords using differant intervals. Then, as you develop a working knowledge of the fretboard, it will become very easy to make whatever chord you need.

There are thousands and thousands of chords. It would be almost impossible to learn all the chords individually
#5
Quote by deathbyawesome
the best way to learn chords, in my opinion, is to learn songs and learn the chords that are needed for each new song. Its funner and easier then memorizing.



I wont say there is a "best" approach, because really there are alot of things that you could do that would be helpful. learning songs and their associated chords as you mentioned is essential IMO. good call on that.

To add to that I'll say you could also:

- learn movable triad shapes and their inversions

- learn movable 7th chord shapes and their inversions

- learn how to manipulate triad and 7th chord voicings into altered chords and chords with upper extensions
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#6
I guess what I'm looking for is more fretboard versatility.

I know a lot of chords already but whenever I write an acoustic song I feel like I'm trapped in the open position and I'm kind of stuck with the same sounding major or minor progression.

I know several barred versions of major and minor chords further down the neck as well as some alternate voicings of them.


I'm pretty glad that now I know how chords are made and I hope that I'll be able to use the fretboard more effectively.


By learning different intervals I'm assuming you mean things like Diminished and minor 7th chords and things like that?