#1
what is a triad with a sharp 5th and is there some kind of dictionary to figure out that kind of thing or a web site
(\__/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination
#2
1 3 #5 is an augmented triad
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#3
Quote by bandet232
what is a triad with a sharp 5th and is there some kind of dictionary to figure out that kind of thing or a web site

For triads, you don't really need a dictionary; here are the basic triad forms.

Major - 1 3 5
Minor - 1 b3 5
Augmented - 1 3 #5
Diminished - 1 b3 b5
#5
Quote by :-D
For triads, you don't really need a dictionary; here are the basic triad forms.

Major - 1 3 5
Minor - 1 b3 5
Augmented - 1 3 #5
Diminished - 1 b3 b5

Sorry for double post, but may I add...
Minor - 1 b3 5
#7
thank you but does anyone have a web site for more in depth triad forms
(\__/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination
#9
Well the most in depth you can get with triads is knowing triads up and down the scale, and inversions.
C, E, and G, for example are the I triad. D, F, and A, are the ii triad, meaning it is the second triad in a major scale, and minor (indicated by the lower case.)
I, IV, and V are major. ii, iii, and vi are minor. The seventh is diminished and is indicated by vii°.
It is completely different in a minor mode, though.
#10
Triad is any 3 note sequence or chords...

But since some time ago (like 500 years) it is used as a tertian (sp?) chord, aka resolving around thirds, and fifths accordingly (all at a third of distance)...

You basicly have mayor triads, and minor triads, each having a perfect fifth, and a minor/major third. It is oftenly associated with the tonic triad of a scale (root), meaning the triad would be tonic-mediant-dominant, although it can vary...

I don't know if diminished/augmented and suspended chords can be considered triads though...
#11
Quote by bandet232
thank you but does anyone have a web site for more in depth triad forms
There's 6 of them:

Major: 1 3 5
Minor: 1 b3 5
Augmented: 1 3 #5
Diminished: 1 b3 b5
Sus2: 1 2 5
Sus4: 1 4 5

Someone is going to moan about my exclusion of "1 3 b5." That chord would never (never say never) be played without a seventh.


If I've missed anything, please post.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
There's 6 of them:

Major: 1 3 5
Minor: 1 b3 5
Augmented: 1 3 #5
Diminished: 1 b3 b5
Sus2: 1 2 5
Sus4: 1 4 5

Someone is going to moan about my exclusion of "1 3 b5." That chord would never (never say never) be played without a seventh.


If I've missed anything, please post.


Are suspended "triads"even considered triads?
I mean, they don't keep up with the western definition of triad...
Only if you consider a triad as tertial though...
#13
well they have 3 notes in them, a triad by definition is a 3 note chord. 2+2=4
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#14
what about 7ths major 7ths and alot of others
(\__/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination
#15
Quote by bandet232
what about 7ths major 7ths and alot of others


They aren't triads.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#16
what are they then
(\__/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination
#17
Quote by bandet232
what are they then

A triad is a chord consisting of three notes - any seventh chord that contains four notes would be classified as a tetrad.
#18
Quote by Archeo Avis
They aren't triads.

because they usually also contain the 1 3 and 5, but why not leave the 5th out,
you hear it more and more these days,
why make a triad of a tetrad? because it can also be used to easily construct an interesting solo,
leaving out the 5th gives you an easily appliable (sp?) triad, which can be moved around like all others, so you can simply use the notes of the triads as target-notes and move the triads around (preferably diatonically, and this sounds a lot more interesting if the triad contains a 7th, while not playing the 5th will keep your phrases from settling (though it can still be done the the 1)

leaving the 3rd out pretty much makes the color fade away, and what can you expect if you can't distinguish minor major and dominant, so thats not recommended, and as for the use in solos, you can leave the root out, so 3 5 7 but for some reason that's still called a tetrad
1953 Epiphone zephyr
1988 PRS custom 24
1960 Moon oct. mandolin
Last edited by Funkicker at Jun 10, 2008,
#20
Quote by Funkicker
because they usually also contain the 1 3 and 5, but why not leave the 5th out
To put 1 3 7 in the same category as 1 3 5 is ridiculous; their functions are very different.