#1
whats the best way to learn scales all over the neck? would it be to memorize the fret board and then memorize the notes in all the modes etc in every key, or is there any otherway, like the pentatonic box shape for example.

thanks
#2
Each mode has a pattern on the E string and the A string.

When you learn each mode, and their order, you can see all the notes for a specific key.

There are only seven basic keys (augmented and diminshed keys notwithstanding), so it's not hard to learn each position.
#5
The best way would be to not do that at all. It's not fun getting caught in that prison, so to speak. Why do you think it's called CAGED?

But I guess learning boxes is a good way to start. Just learn minor pentatonic, minor, major, and harmonic minor boxes (five for each) all over the neck, and practice moving smoothly between each one. Also for each one, learn what notes sound good when grouped together, licks you like, etc.
Quote by Sonicxlover
Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.

Quote by Sonicxlover
Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.

Quote by Sonicxlover
Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.


Parker Nitefly Mojo sonnn
Jackson DK2M Dinky
Carvin Legacy
Fender Blues Jr.
Roland Cube 30X
#6
Quote by Sonicxlover
The best way would be to not do that at all. It's not fun getting caught in that prison, so to speak. Why do you think it's called CAGED?


Anything you misuse can potentilly turn into a prison if you make it so.

The reason there are finger positions like CAGED is to organize the entire fretboard
into logical chunks as an aid to help you see the fretboard better and get your
fingers used to working in the scale structure. It's basically Step 1 in an infinite
series of steps that go into learning the scale on the fretboard. If you never get
beyond step 1, it's your responsibility for remaining stuck there.

If you want to learn to play over the neck, in addition to learning how to navigate
within a finger position, you need to learn how to navigate between them. So,
as others said, you practice stuff that does just that.

"Sheets of Sound" is nice scale study book for this type of thing as it does focus
to a large degree with patterns that move up & down the neck.