#1
I am wondering how to jam "propely" with my friends. Usualy when i jam, i only jam with the drummer, so he gives the beat and i just folow it with chords and some impro solos. But how do we jam with another guitar or a bass? Even if we manage to get into the same key (thats pretty hard, since i am pretty much the only one that knows at least a little bit of music theory) we seem to be strugeling. Nobody wants to do the rythm, everyone wants to just solo, and even if i do the rythy, the bass and the second guitar always battle for atention, and to top it all, they dont give a rats ass about the rythm that the drummer gives. So, what are some legitemate methods for us to jam better?
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#2
Learn some theory, learn to sit back and play in the background or nothing when someone else is soloing, learn some tunes.
#4
Get your drummer to start with a beat
then play a simple chord sequence over the top, like A D C D or whatever
get the bassist to follow
then let the other guitarist improvise over the top.
When you want to swap make like a signal or start playing louder and go into a small solo, the othter guitarist should get the idea, if not theyre ignorant musicians
You can build from there getting more complex etc
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


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#5
tahat was quick. im gonna try it today, i hope they go along with it
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#6
Learn a song (or a few songs) to jam to, and in terms of the bassist and other guitarist duping it out I think your best bet is to tell them not to be such rear ends, which I'm sure you've done many times anyway making this whole statement pointless.
#7
Playing rythm is as fun as playing solo. If you do it with some style, and ofcourse experience is needed. Rythm playing is not just like playing powerchords... Notes can be put in between them, and funny stuff... But it all comes after a time, and definetly not without practice. If your bandmates don't even know the basic scales then that's not even a band, that's bull****. Sorry man, but to know at least one scale is like elemental culture in music. It's needed to jam. It really isn't hard to be in the same key.. just learn theory and the scales, and it's so easy. And I don't even know how can they play "solo" if they don't **** about music? Do they hear that they're playing in the wrong key?
#8
i know a few scales and the elementary music theory. If you wonder how they solo: They take bits and pieces of every solo they know and kinda mash them together. Needles to say, it sounds horrible.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#9
Oh, lol. Maybe they've just started. Force them to learn scales, 'cause they're very important, believe me. Not just for soloing.
#10
they have been playing for 2-3 years, at lest that i know of it....
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#11
Try teaching them pentatonic scales. Show them all 5 forms in a single key (A minor is common), then tell them to practice them at home. The next day, start playing a chord progression in the key of A minor and tell them to try to use the A minor pentatonic scale to solo over your progression. Tell them to start by staying in one form, then to try switching between two, etc. Eventually, they'll get out of the whole forms thing and see the scale as a whole, and that's the point where you know they have a feel for the fretboard and should be able to solo freely. That should take care of their soloing problem, slowly but surely.

As for their selfishness problem, try taking even turns at playing lead and rhythm. Rhythm is very fun as well, just be creative. ALways be the optimist at jam sessions and always try to keep everyone having fun. Be a critic. If they aren't playing well, tell them what they need to improve. Don't encourage bad playing.

Have fun!
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#13
Quote by XSider
Playing rythm is as fun as playing solo. If you do it with some style, and ofcourse experience is needed. Rythm playing is not just like playing powerchords... Notes can be put in between them, and funny stuff... But it all comes after a time, and definetly not without practice. If your bandmates don't even know the basic scales then that's not even a band, that's bull****. Sorry man, but to know at least one scale is like elemental culture in music. It's needed to jam. It really isn't hard to be in the same key.. just learn theory and the scales, and it's so easy. And I don't even know how can they play "solo" if they don't **** about music? Do they hear that they're playing in the wrong key?


Very true. Rhythm can be made so interesting.

Go on YouTube and search for rhythm lessons. Listen to some Jimmy Hendrix. Add flavor to your rhythms. Scratch rhythm and and accented strumming patterns on barre chords or open chords are good examples of how you can add an interesting twist to basic rhythm. Listen to the intro to "All Along the Watchtower" by Jimmy Hendrix. Notice how he does the muted strum between the chords. Try using things like that in your rhythm.

Fills and connecting licks can be done too. Just mess around with it and practice it at home. You'll find it to be just as much fun as soloing.

EDIT: Go here. It's a website that has a lot of backing tracks to different songs. The link takes you straight ot the jam tracks section. They're all just basic drums beats with interesting rhythms. Instead of sololing over them right now, try jistening to just the jam tracks to get a feel and an idea of what cool rhythm playing is like. Notice how there are none where they just strum 4 quater notes each measure. They all have an intersting pattern.
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Last edited by philipp122 at Jun 9, 2008,
#14
Rhythm doesn't even need to be a progression. Look at most metal music, the lead guitarist and rhythm guitarist play the same thing a lot of the time. Sometimes the rythm guitarist will play the same thing as you, but a 3rd higher or so. Only difference is lead has a solo.

As long as you two play in the same key, it should sound fine.
#15
Man i kinda like playin rhythm more than lead. But i also play alot of metal. Rhythm can be a very cool part. It's not all about the solos. You gotta have the br00talz too!
#16
As mentioned, learn some covers together. When I was with my last group we learned some stuff like Smoke On The Water and Seek And Destroy, and at random points we would break into solos. Works pretty well.
#17
all of you decide on a song that has aythm, lead, bass, drums and practice over the week, then when you jam jam out the song, this will help you guys to know how it feels to jam with others. then after that you will all have an idea of when to play, when not to play, and what part to play.