#1
Im a bit confused with Modes and the Pentatonic Major Scale

Do the Pentatonic Scales have their own special Modes?
or what?
#3
In short, yes.

(in semitones)
Major Pent: Root 2 2 3 2 3
2nd Mode Root 2 3 2 3 2
3rd Mode: Root 3 2 3 2 2
4th Mode: Root 2 3 2 2 3
Minor Pent: Root 3 2 2 3 2
#4
They do, and they're formed that exact same way you form modes like Lydian and Dorian from the parent scale, but they're useless for establishing a chord progression. However, they can be used as cool substitutions. I have some stuff to do, but I can explain when I get back.
#5
I'm double posting and no one will care. Got it?

Let's look at the C major pentatonic: C D E G A. The intervals are 1 2 3 5 6. It lacks the fourth and seventh, so use it as a substitute for a scale containing 1 2 3 5 6, but various fourths and sevenths.

Second mode: D E G A C. Intervals from D: 1 2 4 5 b7. This can be used in place of Dorian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, any scale that contains the intervals above plus various thirds and 6ths.


Get it?
#7
Quote by Opalyptica
Yeah, I think so
So we have modes of the major pentatonic scale
But in https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=298378
we have descriptions of Ionian Pentatonics, Dorian Pentatonics, ect

Are these different from the 1st mode, 2nd mode, of the major pentatonic?

They're the same thing. The pentatonic (5 tone) scales are derived from the diatonic (7 tone) scales. If you take the major scale (Ionian) and take out the 4th and 7th intervals and you have the Ionian pentatonic scale. That goes with the other modes as well (you have the 7 notes and take out 2 to get the pentatonic mode).
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#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
They do, and they're formed that exact same way you form modes like Lydian and Dorian from the parent scale, but they're useless for establishing a chord progression. However, they can be used as cool substitutions. I have some stuff to do, but I can explain when I get back.
I disagree. The thing that makes pentatonics special is that those five notes are common in all the modes. So all the notes that the major modes (mixolydian, lydian, ionian) have in common is called the pentatonic major scale. And the same thing for minor modes.

I can't see any purpose to using pentatonics as a parent scale for modes. If I wanted to play something without the third and the sixth I wouldnt play with the third and the sixth. Ofcourse, if anyone here finds a use for them, I'd gladly listen.

And BGC, dont double post. Your good but not that good.
#9
well if you approach modes like i do in a relative way rather than a parallel way this will help you understand it a lot easier