#1
hi all

I've had my Ibanez RG for about a year now. since the first week i got it, whenever i tuned it, ive always had tuning problems. dont get me wrong, when it does get in tune, it STAYS in tune, and overall its a wonderful guitar in both tone and playability. however, when changing strings especially, it has always been very quick to lose its neck and bridge settings and give me a hard time tuning it to standard E tuning without having to adjust the springs, or lower the action, etc... up till about a week ago, however, somehow i always managed.

now, however, the real problems have started. when i start tuning the high E for example, the upper 3 strings start de-tuning (losing tension). When I then go to tune the low strings up again, the high strings start losing tension, with the result that now it is virtually impossible to get the guitar in tune, since increasing tension in one string means losing tension in another, and i can never get all strings in tune. naturally, the bridge is now WAY too high, and my action resembles more that of a classical guitar rather than an electric guitar since its so high! (i happen to like my action really nice and low). so my question is this...

can anybody please help in pointing out what the source of this problem is, and whether i can try do anything to solve it or at least make it better? I can take it to a guitar tech, but every guitar tech i know charges way too much for a simple service, and often don't do a job which lasts anyway, and im not willing to pay for an incomplete service. so any help of any form, I'll appreciate GREATLY!!

thanks again

Dan
#2
did you wrap your strings good enough?
Quote by Jack Off Jill
Better than hooked on crack, I suppose. I'd rather know my kids are safe at home beating their meat than out in the world robbing old women for their crack fix.

Quote by *sigh*
What a huge coincidence. I have a butthole also.
#3
Seems like you switched to a higher gauge string, which means that the springs in the bridge arent as strong as the strings (the strings pull the bridge more towards the neck). Youll have to open up the back, the big rectangle section, and tighten the screws attached to the springs. Check out these:

http://myrightbrain.wordpress.com/2008/04/17/changing-to-higher-guaged-strings-adjusting-a-floating-guitar-bridge/

http://www.guitarnoise.com/article.php?id=103
#4
^ what he said. and did you wrap them properly? If you wrap them the wrong way then they will naturally unwind/de-tune. I did this my first time changing strings, and my dad was like...ah you screwed up.
people with large sig's are clearly compensating for something.
#5
Quote by Lamrick21
^ what he said. and did you wrap them properly? If you wrap them the wrong way then they will naturally unwind/de-tune. I did this my first time changing strings, and my dad was like...ah you screwed up.

same here
pretty simple and quite common problem
Quote by Jack Off Jill
Better than hooked on crack, I suppose. I'd rather know my kids are safe at home beating their meat than out in the world robbing old women for their crack fix.

Quote by *sigh*
What a huge coincidence. I have a butthole also.
#6
There's no problem - what you're describing is perfectly normal behaviour for a Floyd Rose system, what is surprising is that you never realisd this before. The bridge is held in place by the balance of tension between springs and strings. If you change the tension, like when you alter the tuning of a string, then all the other strings will shift to compensate. That means you have to keep going over your tuning until it finally settles down.

If you've just restrung then you need to make sure that you've stretched the strings thoroughly, as with any guitar, and also check that you'v eused the same gauge. If you've used heavier strings then you'll need to increase the spring tension to compensate.

Here, read this before you do anything else...
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#7
no ive tuned them all correctly. my bad, maybe i didnt explain the problem well enough. ok lets say im tuning the B string up, so im increasing its tension in this string. AT THE SAME TIME as im doing this, the D, A and low E strings start to detune (without me even touching their tuners). in other words, this detuning effect occurs on its own. im POSITIVE im turning the tuning heads the right way, and the strings are wound correctly (ive done it quite a number of time now :P ). im almost certain its a floyd rose related problem, something to do with the bridge. it might be the springs but ill have to check about that
#8
Quote by ice_622
no ive tuned them all correctly. my bad, maybe i didnt explain the problem well enough. ok lets say im tuning the B string up, so im increasing its tension in this string. AT THE SAME TIME as im doing this, the D, A and low E strings start to detune (without me even touching their tuners). in other words, this detuning effect occurs on its own. im POSITIVE im turning the tuning heads the right way, and the strings are wound correctly (ive done it quite a number of time now :P ). im almost certain its a floyd rose related problem, something to do with the bridge. it might be the springs but ill have to check about that


I've just explained it to you...it isn't a "problem" as such, it's perfectly normal, you just have to deal with it.

If you increase tension in one string all the others will decrease in tension in order to maintain equilibrium...you can't cheat physics!
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com