#1
Hey guys. What is the best method for me to learn so that I will be able to move a scale up and down the fret board? I know that there are patterns to every scale. Is that all that it is? Do you have any helpful tips on how to remember where to go? Thanks.
#2
the best thing in the long term, athough it takes a while, is to learn the notes ALL OVER the fretboard, learn what notes are a scale, and apply it
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#3
Another thing, I was just looking at all of the different patterns to a scale. Lets just say Am Pentatonic. Does the scale not start on the Root note of the key? Like pattern 6 of Am starts on C. If im playing with someone that is holding a A chord, will this 6th pattern work for me. That's where im kinda confused i guess.
#4
If you youtube "hopscotch method", I find that reasonably helpful a lot of the time.
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#5
Not all the patterns will start on the root. If you're trying to sound in key, one good technique is to begin on a root note and resolve on a root. All the in between just has to be apart of the scale.
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#6
A minor pentatonic will always sound like A minor pentatonic if the progression is in A minor. no matter what note you start on. period.

as for learning scales, learn some of the patterns, while playing them say the names of the notes out loud, you will begin to learn the fretboard that way. learn how to construct scales (it really doesn't take that much effort). learn how intervals work. once you have a working knowledge of all of this (which really doesn't take that much work) you will be able to play scales anywhere on the neck. the patterns are there because that is the way the guitar is designed, not because those are the only places to play the scales.
#7
So Is it 'Am Pentatonic' because you're playing the minor pentatonic shape starting on A or is it because there is a particular shape for Am Pentatonic and Bm Pentatonic etc?

Also if i play Am Pentatonic starting on a C for example, will it still be Am Pentatonic or is it now C Pentatonic?

A million cookies for anyone that gives me an understandable explanation thanks.
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#8
Quote by edgespear
So Is it 'Am Pentatonic' because you're playing the minor pentatonic shape starting on A or is it because there is a particular shape for Am Pentatonic and Bm Pentatonic etc?

Also if i play Am Pentatonic starting on a C for example, will it still be Am Pentatonic or is it now C Pentatonic?

A million cookies for anyone that gives me an understandable explanation thanks.

Neither.

It's Am pentatonic because it's the notes A C D E G...the shapes aren't important really, it's the notes they contain that matters. That's all there is to it, there's nothing more to say on the matter.

If that doesn't really mean anything to you then you need to get some basic theory knowledge under your belt. You can't understand any of this stuff without referring to notes, the patterns alone don't really teach you anything.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jun 23, 2008,
#9
Quote by edgespear
So Is it 'Am Pentatonic' because you're playing the minor pentatonic shape starting on A or is it because there is a particular shape for Am Pentatonic and Bm Pentatonic etc?

Also if i play Am Pentatonic starting on a C for example, will it still be Am Pentatonic or is it now C Pentatonic?

A million cookies for anyone that gives me an understandable explanation thanks.


Shapes 1-5 of A minor pentatonic are all "A minor Pentatonic."

If you play shape 1 starting on the 7th fret of the E string, this will be "B minor Pentatonic".
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#10
Quote by edgespear
So Is it 'Am Pentatonic' because you're playing the minor pentatonic shape starting on A or is it because there is a particular shape for Am Pentatonic and Bm Pentatonic etc?

Also if i play Am Pentatonic starting on a C for example, will it still be Am Pentatonic or is it now C Pentatonic?

A million cookies for anyone that gives me an understandable explanation thanks.

you can start on any note in that scale. you dont need to always start on A to play in A. as long as you use the notes in the scale, you are playing in the scale(obviously).
#11
I see. So it's the notes that count. Right, so, if i take the same shape and move it relatively up the fret board, will that possibly change key?
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#12
Quote by edgespear
I see. So it's the notes that count. Right, so, if i take the same shape and move it relatively up the fret board, will that possibly change key?

Just see what the notes are,...if they've changed then yes, you're in a different key.
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#13
Quote by edgespear
I see. So it's the notes that count. Right, so, if i take the same shape and move it relatively up the fret board, will that possibly change key?
Probably, but not always.

You know the standard, 5 8 5 8 type of Am pentatonic. If you move that up to fret 12, it's the Em pentatonic. However, playing that "Em pentatonic" over an Am progression is still Am! How does this work? Well, the Em pentatonic contains the notes E G A B D, all of which are in the key of Am! You can also play the scale at the 10th fret, as the "Dm pentatonic," as the Dm pentatonic contains the notes D F G A C, all of which are in the key of Am.


In reality, this is only half-true, but until such time that you're "ready for modes," this answer will work just fine.


Typically, though, the 12 15 pentatonic scale isn't considered an A scale. It's usually just the Em pentatonic.

Quote by edgespear
Only the notes count
It's called music theory, not guitar theory, and other instruments don't have positions, shapes, nor patterns, just notes. Notes are the only thing that ever matter.
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Probably, but not always.

You know the standard, 5 8 5 8 type of Am pentatonic. If you move that up to fret 12, it's the Em pentatonic. However, playing that "Em pentatonic" over an Am progression is still Am! How does this work? Well, the Em pentatonic contains the notes E G A B D, all of which are in the key of Am! You can also play the scale at the 10th fret, as the "Dm pentatonic," as the Dm pentatonic contains the notes D F G A C, all of which are in the key of Am.


In reality, this is only half-true, but until such time that you're "ready for modes," this answer will work just fine.


Typically, though, the 12 15 pentatonic scale isn't considered an A scale. It's usually just the Em pentatonic.

It's called music theory, not guitar theory, and other instruments don't have positions, shapes, nor patterns, just notes. Notes are the only thing that ever matter.

actually, a lot of instruments have positions and patterns and "shapes".