#1
About 2 minutes ago i read a post on here about a guy saying that a good way to learn scales although it takes a long time is too learn the notes on the fret board of by heart and then learn the notes in that scale. Although iv always learnt the scale in "patters" this sounded like a very good idea too me (in the long run) because i can figure any note out on the fret board but i cant get it instantly, i just wonderd if any of you have done it this way, how you found it and also what execise you used too know the notes so well. Any insights welcomed

peace x
#2
Look for a lesson by Casualty01 (Cas) about fretbpard memorization in the archives.

Read the theory lesson in my signature.

Learn the patterns, they are useful, but learn the theory behind scales and memorize the fretboard so you can easily move between positions.
#3
once you know the fretboard and scale construction the patterns simply become easy reference. it's good to know that patterns but also good to know why the patterns exist so that you can manipulate them and use them with a musical purpose.

so i'd say, learn the fretboard, but also learn intervals (which in turn will help you learn the fretboard), mix that with the knowledge of what makes up scales and chords and you'll be able to find things all over the fretboard extremely quickly.
#4
Quote by Zakk_Lp
About 2 minutes ago i read a post on here about a guy saying that a good way to learn scales although it takes a long time is too learn the notes on the fret board of by heart and then learn the notes in that scale. Although iv always learnt the scale in "patters" this sounded like a very good idea too me (in the long run) because i can figure any note out on the fret board but i cant get it instantly, i just wonderd if any of you have done it this way, how you found it and also what execise you used too know the notes so well. Any insights welcomed

peace x


To me, based on the way notes are accessed on the guitar, playing guitar is basically
a 2D pattern game. You can memorize notes til the end of days, but if you don't
have the notes "under your fingers" you won't be able to play fluidly in realtime.
Having notes "under your fingers" is basically patterns.

The thing to realize is, EVERYTHING has a logical pattern on the guitar and that
patterns can relate to other patterns and/or overlay each other at the same time.

If I'm soloing in a major scale for instance, I may be seeing the patterns for the
scale finger positions, but at the same time I can be seeing other patterns on top
of that that organize things in a variety of musical ways -- I might be seeing
diatonic arpeggio patterns, or diatonic 3rds, or chord tone arpeggios, just about
anything -- all at the same time. Some patterns give meaning to the notes, others
might be some "interesting geometries" to explore.

I'm not totally unaware of note names, but I seldom explicitly think about them.
Far more often I'll be looking for certain scale degrees in the patterns as opposed
to note names.
#5
Quote by Zakk_Lp
About 2 minutes ago i read a post on here about a guy saying that a good way to learn scales although it takes a long time is too learn the notes on the fret board of by heart and then learn the notes in that scale. Although iv always learnt the scale in "patters" this sounded like a very good idea too me (in the long run) because i can figure any note out on the fret board but i cant get it instantly, i just wonderd if any of you have done it this way, how you found it and also what execise you used too know the notes so well. Any insights welcomed

peace x



Forget the "NOT PATTERNS" part of that and you're on the right track. The patterns exist and are always helpful. Ignore any advice that gives them a negative connotation. Ultimately you want to know the notes on the fretboard AND the patterns.


how do you get to know the notes? well its like learning a new language. it doesnt happen over night, and there is no 1 excercise that will get you there.
Basically you have to start reading music. That means getting a method book and dedicating time regularly to practicing that skill. As you get better at reading, your knowledge of where the notes are on the fretboard will increase. Again, this takes time.

There are some shortcuts that can help as well, and im sure someone will post them. Keep in mind though that a true understanding of the fretboard comes from experience. Reading music regularly gives you that.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 9, 2008,
#6
Quote by GuitarMunky


how do you get to know the notes? well its like learning a new language. it doesnt happen over night, and there is no 1 excercise that will get you there.
Basically you have to start reading music.


i have to disagree with you here. learning the notes on the fretboard can be as simple as memorizing them. for several months i'd take 5 minutes each day and just run up a string and say the note name outloud as quick as i could remember it correctly (saying it outloud is a mental thing that really puts it into your brain & i recommend it, even if your family/friends think you sound like some down syndrome dolt reciting garbage) as i ran up the string i'd name the notes # and going down they were all flats (this isn't the case with actual music but i did it this way to get both into my head) after a couple of months i REALLY had it down and now when i go off and do leads i just think about the chord coming up and what i want to do over it and my hands almost adjust by themselves. this of course is due largely in part to improv'ing over random chord progressions for long periods of time, but i'm of a big believer that if i can do it, anybody can.
#7
Quote by z4twenny
i have to disagree with you here. learning the notes on the fretboard can be as simple as memorizing them. for several months i'd take 5 minutes each day and just run up a string and say the note name outloud as quick as i could remember it correctly (saying it outloud is a mental thing that really puts it into your brain & i recommend it, even if your family/friends think you sound like some down syndrome dolt reciting garbage) as i ran up the string i'd name the notes # and going down they were all flats (this isn't the case with actual music but i did it this way to get both into my head) after a couple of months i REALLY had it down and now when i go off and do leads i just think about the chord coming up and what i want to do over it and my hands almost adjust by themselves. this of course is due largely in part to improv'ing over random chord progressions for long periods of time, but i'm of a big believer that if i can do it, anybody can.



you disagree that reading music helps you learn the notes on the fretboard????

it definitely does help!

I never said it was the only way, just A way, and IMO a very thorough and effective way.

BTW, the things you mentioned are helpful as well.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 9, 2008,