#1
Well I play a lot of metal like Metallica, and Ive come to realize that whenever I try to solo or improvise, It all sounds like the same pentatonic Kirk Hammett run that Im sure most of you are familiar with. I want to get out of this rut. What other kind of scales and exercises can I learn to just find a different approach to soloing? I want to get into faster more technical stuff, like some of the Megadeth solos, but it just doesnt come naturally to me. I'm a pretty decent rhythm player, but when it comes to leads, Im not the best... Thanks for any help, and Im sorry if theres already a place to ask these kind of questions.
#2
Quote by thetoastinator
Well I play a lot of metal like Metallica, and Ive come to realize that whenever I try to solo or improvise, It all sounds like the same pentatonic Kirk Hammett run that Im sure most of you are familiar with. I want to get out of this rut. What other kind of scales and exercises can I learn to just find a different approach to soloing? I want to get into faster more technical stuff, like some of the Megadeth solos, but it just doesnt come naturally to me. I'm a pretty decent rhythm player, but when it comes to leads, Im not the best... Thanks for any help, and Im sorry if theres already a place to ask these kind of questions.


The things that "come natural" to you are based on what you listen to & what you are familiar with. It's not surprising that you would somewhat like Kirk Hammet, if thats who you mostly listen to.

Solution:

listen to something new
learn something new


If you want to learn a Megadeth solo, find the tab, or have someone teach you a few of them to get you started. Then move on to something else.

You've heard the expression "you are what you eat"? That applies here as well..." you are what you listen to".
shred is gaudy music
#3
Quote by GuitarMunky
listen to something new
learn something new
If I could get better at guitar just by listening to music, I'd be a genious.

Brace for repost. Same rules apply, I dont mean to offend, its just my oppinion.

I think you should take it back a step. If I said you were playing major/minor scales (instead of pentatonics) would I be right? Well take a step back and start playing the simple pentatonic scales.

Once you've learnt a few shapes (2 or 3 is fine), you probably should try to focus on what you feel is the right next note and play REALLY slow. If I said you listen to metal/shred would I be right? Listen to some blues instead. Try to become proficient at moving around the fretboard and between shapes.
Copying a singers phrasing and rhthym is generally a good idea to learn how to improvise. And I dont mean metal singers/screamers, who sing really fast. Copy something slow. This is how people started writing those slow blues solo's.


Doing this will get your phrasing (by copying those singers) and your technique (by moving between shapes) ready for doing some real solo's (as in, stuff that sounds good).


Than after you've got all that down and you're good enough to say that you personally enjoy what you're playing (it took me a couple of years to enjoy my pentatonic wankery), you'll be ready to move on. Than study the major scale, the intervals behind it, the way these intervals create harmonic/melodic consonance and dissonance and watch melodic control. Pretty much look for and study as much theory as you can eat.
At this stage you should start realising that the same note can sound better or worse over different chords and some notes sound better or worse when followed (or preceeded) by some notes. Exploiting this will enable you to control what you're solo's are going to feel like, instead of blindly looking for the right note.
#4
Dude, if you're not a natural at the guitar, you can expect to have A LOT of work ahead of you before you can truly do what you want to. But even if you were a natural, there would still be a lot of work to do, and a lot of obstacles to overcome just to get to a point where you were satisfied with your playing.

Basically, there's no shortcut. Everyone has to practice, that's just how it is. But when you can finally play what you really want to play, it's completely worth it. It all pays off in the end.
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#5
Quote by demonofthenight
If I could get better at guitar just by listening to music, I'd be a genious.

Brace


Who said anything about JUST listening to music ??

The TS said hes sick of doing the same old Kirk Hammet sounding pentatonic run. The simple solution is, learn something new. That was my point.

To reiterate:

listen to something NEW:

That means expose yourself to something other than the usual ( Metallica in the Ts's case).


LEARN something NEW:

That means learn something new...... a song/riff/scale/knowledge.....whatever.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 10, 2008,
#6
Quote by Page&HammettFan
Dude, if you're not a natural at the guitar, you can expect to have A LOT of work ahead of you before you can truly do what you want to.
These people that are naturally good at guitar, where do I find them? How are they different from people who arent natural at guitar?

Also being a "natural" at something suggest's that its encoded in someones genes, do you have any information about this?
#7
Quote by demonofthenight
These people that are naturally good at guitar, where do I find them? How are they different from people who arent natural at guitar?

Also being a "natural" at something suggest's that its encoded in someones genes, do you have any information about this?
What Page&HammettFan meant are people that can naturally sense keys and harmonies. Granted, the term natural may be badly chosen. It could be either because of gifts like absolute pitch, or it could be due to a well developped musical memory. But basically Page&HammettFan is right: some people don't have to think about which note will sound good at each beat in a riff. They just feel it.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
These people that are naturally good at guitar, where do I find them? How are they different from people who arent natural at guitar?

Also being a "natural" at something suggest's that its encoded in someones genes, do you have any information about this?

Some people have a natural affinity for certain things, that's an established fact. Talent exists - just because you can't quantify or measure something doesn't mean you can dismiss it.

Matt Le Tissier was a lazy-arse but he was one of the most naturally gifted footballers ever to grace the planet. However there's players who achieved far more than he ever did with a tenth of the talent simply because they worked hard.

Talented people don't have to try as hard, but that doesn't mean they shouldn't. Short term, talent will win out. Long term, hard work will always beat talent...however a talented person who works hard will become one of the best.
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