#1
I've been looking for a new guitar, and I've kind of fallen in love with one, specifically the Alvarez AD 60k. Anyway, I was wonder if the fact that it's not a solid top guitar should dissuade me in any way. I've never known exactly what that meant, but I've never really needed to know until now. Any input would be appreciated, thanks!
-hbolton
#2
solid top means that the piece of wood is one single cut from the tree made of one continuous layer of wood. Solid wood will mature and age as they are played and sound better over the years. Guitars that do not have solid wood will not mature and sound the same over time. You generally want a solid wood guitar. If you dont have the money to buy one then laminate should suffice... but if that were the case then i would just suggest saving up for a solid top wood guitar instead.
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#4
no problem. =)
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#5
Yep, If I were you I would definitely try to find a solid topped guitar that you like.
It's Only Rock and Roll, But I like It
#6
There was this Takamine all-koa model I was looking at, and was definitely one of the best-sounding (and looking) models I played in the store. I later found out that it wasn't solid wood, and that there weren't any solid koa guitars (at least none made by Takamine). I really liked the tone of the koa wood, but should I let the fact that it's non-solid bother me then, even when it sounded better than most of the other solid-tops I did play?
#7
If it sounded better, no you shouldn't. But honestly, there are a very few exceptions of a laminate sounding better than a solid (good construction beats ok materials); and seeing as there are great solid topped guitars (Yamaha fg700/30s and Art and Lutherie) that are competitively priced there are really no reasons for buying a laminate.
#8
Quote by hbolton
I've been looking for a new guitar, and I've kind of fallen in love with one, specifically the Alvarez AD 60k. Anyway, I was wonder if the fact that it's not a solid top guitar should dissuade me in any way. I've never known exactly what that meant, but I've never really needed to know until now. Any input would be appreciated, thanks!
-hbolton


Wait a minute here. As far as I know, or knew (past tense), all Alvarez artist series guitars have solid tops. I own a Regent series Alvarez, and it has a solid sitka spruce top. The Regent series is more of an entry level guitar than the Artist series is.
Where did you hear or read that the AD60K was not a solid top?
I could be mistaken here because unfortunately the Alvarez web site doesn't list the AD60K as of yet.
If you really want to know for sure, just shoot Tom Kruszka an email. He's my primary contact with Alvarez, and will be glad to answer your question. He is very prompt about replying to emails as well. Here's his email address:

Tom.Kruszka@loudtechinc.com

Good luck to ya, and I hope you do decide to get the guitar. It's a beaut and is sure to sound as great as it looks.
#9
Quote by Siren Silently
If it sounded better, no you shouldn't. But honestly, there are a very few exceptions of a laminate sounding better than a solid (good construction beats ok materials); and seeing as there are great solid topped guitars (Yamaha fg700/30s and Art and Lutherie) that are competitively priced there are really no reasons for buying a laminate.


I think there is a reason to buy a laminate:

YOU LIKE THE GUITAR!

Just because it isn't solid doesn't mean the guitar isn't good. It doesn't mean the guitar doesn't have something that appeals to someone.

My point is, if you like the guitar out more then all the other ones you have tried in your price range then why not get it any how. It is obviously a guitar for you if you love it like you said.

Just my opinion though.
#10
I also don't see it as an advantage the sound will change with a solid top, I mean, you like the current one right?
Besides, less to worry about changes in humidity with laminate.
#11
Quote by Nacho Cheese!
I think there is a reason to buy a laminate:

YOU LIKE THE GUITAR!

Just because it isn't solid doesn't mean the guitar isn't good. It doesn't mean the guitar doesn't have something that appeals to someone.

My point is, if you like the guitar out more then all the other ones you have tried in your price range then why not get it any how. It is obviously a guitar for you if you love it like you said.

Just my opinion though.


That was stated in the first sentence. It's preference, I just honestly don't see why you would want a laminated guitar when there so many good solid tops out there.
#12
Quote by Dylan_IE
I also don't see it as an advantage the sound will change with a solid top, I mean, you like the current one right?
Besides, less to worry about changes in humidity with laminate.


the maturing and aging of wood is definitely an advantage. the sound gets better, never worse. volume increases, overtones turn more complex, etc. aged wood means that the full potential of the guitar is brought out. if a solid top guitar sounds good when you buy it new, it'll sound amazing in 5-10 years when it's really played in.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#13
Although I would prefer an all-laminate guitar over a solid wood guitar ONLY when the situation calls for extreme durability, ie. camping, beach, bonfires, hard-reckless jamming.. Laminate guitars are MUCH more durable than all solid guitars and do not require you to keep it at an optimal humidity.
#14
Quote by LeftyDave
Wait a minute here. As far as I know, or knew (past tense), all Alvarez artist series guitars have solid tops. I own a Regent series Alvarez, and it has a solid sitka spruce top. The Regent series is more of an entry level guitar than the Artist series is.
Where did you hear or read that the AD60K was not a solid top?
I could be mistaken here because unfortunately the Alvarez web site doesn't list the AD60K as of yet.
If you really want to know for sure, just shoot Tom Kruszka an email. He's my primary contact with Alvarez, and will be glad to answer your question. He is very prompt about replying to emails as well. Here's his email address:

Tom.Kruszka@loudtechinc.com

Good luck to ya, and I hope you do decide to get the guitar. It's a beaut and is sure to sound as great as it looks.


Actually, I did check the sight, and they do have it listed. It says "Figured Dao". Again I'm not quite sure of the terminology, but that doesn't seem to mean solid.
#15
solid top is better man .. trust me .. and when only the top is solid you dont have to worry about humidity as much vs a solid body and top guitar .. laminate sides and solid top can be very forgiving with humidity .. go play them at the store .. if you really like the laminate then get it .. but solid will get better
#16
Quote by hbolton
Actually, I did check the sight, and they do have it listed. It says "Figured Dao". Again I'm not quite sure of the terminology, but that doesn't seem to mean solid.


Yep, you're right, it's there. I was clicking in the products area and couldn't find it, but it's listed under "Find an instrument by model name". Cool. Now that that's settled, on to bigger and better things.
The word "figured" certainly does not mean solid or lack thereof. What it means is that the wood is highly figured, referring to the grain pattern. It's a similar term to "quilted" which I'm sure you've seen tagged onto other guitars. I'm still relatively certain that the artist series utilizes solid woods in their construction. Still, if you want to be totally sure, ask Tom Kruszka.