#1
ok, so here's most of what I've learned, please tell me where I should focus my theory learning next:

-Major, minor keys
-Chord construction
-Harmonization
-Major, minor scales
-Modes
-Time signatures, polyrythms, odd time signatures
-Song dynamics
-Chord Progressions
-Blues
-some counterpoint
-soloing over chord progressions
-modulation

Tool, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin and Paganini are my favorite musicians. I don't know many exotic scales, but never found it that important, as well, the virtuoso styles (fast arpeggiation, rapid alternate picking etc. etc.) aren't important to me. So that being said what should I learn next? I jam with people all the time and I want to continue learning as much as possible, thanks.
#2
well taking modes and theory to the next level would be learning the harmonic minor and harmonic minor modes (harmonic minor modes are awesome)
#4
Reading and writing songs/your own songs in standard notation. Writing them out in 4 part soprano, alto, tenner, and bass is also a good idea too. Try getting a program to help you do this (Sibelius, Finale, etc.). This will help you become more comfortable with your theory and teach you the basics of sight reading, etc.
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Portugal. The Man »–
#5
Quote by farcry
ok, so here's most of what I've learned, please tell me where I should focus my theory learning next:

-Major, minor keys
-Chord construction
-Harmonization
-Major, minor scales
-Modes
-Time signatures, polyrythms, odd time signatures
-Song dynamics
-Chord Progressions
-Blues
-some counterpoint
-soloing over chord progressions
-modulation

Tool, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin and Paganini are my favorite musicians. I don't know many exotic scales, but never found it that important, as well, the virtuoso styles (fast arpeggiation, rapid alternate picking etc. etc.) aren't important to me. So that being said what should I learn next? I jam with people all the time and I want to continue learning as much as possible, thanks.


I highly doubt you have learned all those - you may have learned the concepts, but can you spell me out a G#min9 or Fmin13?

The notes in the key of F#?

Write me a chord sequence beginning with a II-V-I in G, and modulating to Em.

Play comfortably in groupings of 5, 7 and 11?


It takes people (including me) many years to truly get those ideas down - not just the "idea of the idea", but the idea itself, the musical application in context and without help from textbook or time spent "figgering it out".

In short, depth of understanding, not breadth.

Hope this comes across in the spirit it's meant.
#6
^ i was actually going to suggest the TS begin to apply what he thinks he's learned to find out how well he's actually learned it. You can know it somewhat in your head but have no idea how to apply it, if so then it's still fairly worthless. but if you can apply it musically and make it sound good in a multitude of ways then you do actually know it. Thats the clincher there is seeing if you can actually use what you "know" to consistently come up with good varied musical ideas.