#1
Say I am playing this chord
G|16
D|16
A|14
E|0
what exactly would you call this?
I'm leaning forwards calling it B5/E
But I'm not entirely sure.
Last edited by Dwardom at Jun 10, 2008,
#6
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Depending on the situation it's used in, you could call it either Esus2, or E/B5

For clarification, it would be B5/E as opposed to E/B5. E/B5 implies a polychord consisting of an E major chord over a B power chord. Just a little notation issue but a huge difference in meaning.
#7
Quote by :-D
For clarification, it would be B5/E as opposed to E/B5. E/B5 implies a polychord consisting of an E major chord over a B power chord. Just a little notation issue but a huge difference in meaning.


In that sense, wouldn't B5/E imply a B power chord over an E Major chord?

I thought a slash chord was just written bass/chord.
#8
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
In that sense, wouldn't B5/E imply a B power chord over an E Major chord?

I thought a slash chord was just written bass/chord.

Nope, it's chord/bass note.

A "B5/E" does not imply a polychord because that's slash chord notation; seeing the chord at the left, we assume that E is just a singular note. If you wanted a polychord, you'd have to write something like B5/Emaj.
#11
Or, it would not be a polychord because X5 are not chords, they lack the 3rd.
#12
Quote by CanCan
Or, it would not be a polychord because X5 are not chords, they lack the 3rd.

You're right that they are not chords, but that's aside from the point; E/B5 is polychord notation.

EDIT: It's not the lack of a third that makes it "not a chord", it's the fact that there are two notes, so it's just a harmonic interval.