#2
You are correct. Depending on the exact progression, however, your song may, in fact, be in A minor (as the scales share the same notes). The surest fire way to establish the key as C major is through the resolution of the V chord to the I chord (better: V7-I)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jun 10, 2008,
#3
Actually no, you see that c is after the letter b thus making your statement invalid
#4
Quote by brandon_
Actually no, you see that c is after the letter b thus making your statement invalid


...what?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
V chord to the I chord (better: V7-I)

I didn't understand that. Could you elaborate if possible?
#6
Quote by aL13
V chord to the I chord (better: V7-I)

I didn't understand that. Could you elaborate if possible?


He just described a perfect cadence, which is a conventional way to resolve musical passages.
#7
Well the fact that you dont know everything about music makes you a total retard go die
#8
Quote by brandon_
Well the fact that you dont know everything about music makes you a total retard go die


Hahaha, you clearly no little or nothing about music, so stop spamming.
#9
The chords that you named - C Dm Em F G Am Bdim are known as the I ii iii IV V vi vii of the major scale.

The strongest movement to define a major key is moving from the V (Gmaj) to the I (Cmaj).


Quote by idiot brandon
Well the fact that you dont know everything about music makes you a total retard go die


oh dear.... where do these kids come from?
#10
Quote by branny1982
The chords that you named - C Dm Em F G Am Bdim are known as the I ii iii IV V vi vii of the major scale.

The strongest movement to define a major key is moving from the V (Gmaj) to the I (Cmaj).


You're a better explainer than me.


#11
Quote by brandon_
Well the fact that you dont know everything about music makes you a total retard go die


What the hell's your problem?, Yes I have minimal knowledge about music, That's the reason why I'm asking this questions.
#12
Quote by branny1982
The chords that you named - C Dm Em F G Am Bdim are known as the I ii iii IV V vi vii of the major scale.

The strongest movement to define a major key is moving from the V (Gmaj) to the I (Cmaj).


oh dear.... where do these kids come from?


That explains a lot. Thanks
#14
it was anti-theory spam. probably distributed by someone who can barely read let alone understand the concept of an octave.

in response to the post:

yes what you have written out is the way to harmonize the C major scale in triads.

the V7 chord refers to the chord built off of the 5th (roman numeral V) degree of the scale, in this case G.

the fact that the roman numeral is capitalised as V means that it is a triad/chord with a Major quality (1-3-5). for G that would be G-B-D.

the "7" after the chord requires a little bit more explaining:

you harmonized the major scale by stacking thirds. a Major chord is a Major third with a minor third stacked on top for the fifth. Look at a C Major triad. C to E is a major third. E to G is a minor third.

a minor chord is a minor third with a Major third stacked on top. A minor --> A to C is a minor third, C to E is a Major Third.

now if you add another third on top of the fifth you get a seventh. there are four main types of seventh chords:

Major 7th
Dominant 7th
Minor 7th
Minor 7th b5

Major 7th: a Major Triad stacked with a Major Third on top. THe chord is written as xmaj7. for Cmaj7-->C to E (major third), E to G (minor 3rd), G to B (Major 3rd).

Dominant 7th: a Major Third with a minor 3rd stacked on top. the chord is written as x7. for G7-->G to B (Major Third), B to D (minor third), D to F (minor third).

Minor 7th: a minor triad with a minor 7th stacked on top. the chord is written as xmin7 or xm7. for Dm7--> D to F (minor third), F to A (Major third), A to C (minor third).

Minor 7th b5: don't be intimidated by the b5. this chord is just a diminished triad (stacked minor thirds) with major third on top. it is written as xmin7b5 or xm7b5. for Bm7b5 --> B to D (minor third), D to F (minor third), F to A (major third).

C major harmonized in Sevenths is as follows

Cmaj7 (Imaj7), Dm7 (ii7), Em7 (iii7), Fmaj7 (IVmaj7), G7 (V7), Am7 (vi7), Bm7b5 (vii7b5)

i know that's alot of information to take in but it will help in the long run. the stacking of intervals method is good when you're beginning to learn but i would recommend learning the rest of the intervals (e.g. perfect fourth, fifth, augmented fifth, sixth, etc) and learning about diatonic chord theory. i just thought i would give you some information so can take chord theory a bit further.
Last edited by sisuphi at Jun 10, 2008,
#15
Quote by aL13
I just read the lesson..
http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/chords/what_chords_are_in_what_key_and_why.html

so does this mean that the chords in the C Major Scales are, C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bdim?.
if so, can I base my chord progressions here?..

for example, C - Am - Em. Would this be okay?


For the time being, yes. If you find that you feel the composition has a minor feel and resolves more to Am than to C major, then you're playing in A minor, not C major. They contain the same notes, but one revolves around C and sounds major, the other revolves around A and sounds minor. Its up to you to listen and see which you're playing if you're confused.

A strong C major progession for example, could revolve around C F and G, finishing on C.

A strong Am progression could go Am, C, Em, finishing on Am.

Good luck improving yourself as a player.