#1
It seems that as I practice and become more conscious of mistakes that I am making, I have to "go back" and play really slowly quite a substantial amount in order to fix any bad habits i have (muting, thumb touching string). does anyone else find this to be the case? as in, almost like having to reconstruct your guitar technique each time to fix a mistake?

it's not as dire as all that, i have just noticed recently that i have been spending alot of time at 40bpm (eighth notes) when three months ago i was practicing 115 bpm (16ths).

EDIT: it's also quite annoying to be somewhat knowledgeable about theory and be inhibited by technique. almost like i have the mental side down, now i need to work on the physical side.
#2
^ hey, it happens to everyone all the time. I've been recently starting exercises that i could start at 115bpm at 25 just to make sure my technique is consistent and i can be focused and warmed up by the time i reach anything approaching my top speed.

It's pretty simple - as you practice, you notice more mistakes. Don't let it get you down, visualize yourself in 3 months, playing without your current hindrances. I've got a big practice blog going on atm, if you wanna check it out. I know exactly how you feel.
#3
Quote by sisuphi

EDIT: it's also quite annoying to be somewhat knowledgeable about theory and be inhibited by technique. almost like i have the mental side down, now i need to work on the physical side.


ugh, finally someone gets me.
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#5
hehe. you it does grind on me a bit when i think that i can start ploughing through exercises and then i find that i haven't noticed that i'm not muting or my thumb's hitting the strings when i pick and i just have to go right back again. AHHH!

that said, a good way to practice using all that theory shiz is to make slow ambient progressions, you can do some crazy stuff with slash chords, inversions and open strings. i'm currently working on trying to find as many polychords (not quite as feasible on the guitar as they are on the key board) as possible all over the fretboard, so far i'm simply hitting the open E string, playing G or G# on the fifth string then barring different chord triads further down the neck.


yea i'll just keep playing, and i'll visit your blog. thanks guys.
#6
Quote by sisuphi
that said, a good way to practice using all that theory shiz is to make slow ambient progressions, you can do some crazy stuff with slash chords, inversions and open strings. i'm currently working on trying to find as many polychords (not quite as feasible on the guitar as they are on the key board) as possible all over the fretboard, so far i'm simply hitting the open E string, playing G or G# on the fifth string then barring different chord triads further down the neck.


In my time i've done some composition for harp, i used to try and imitate it by moving various voicings around, it's amazing how easy it is to come up with some really nice stuff. Actually, if you click the angel in my profile, the very first chord in that came from that kind of exercise.
#7
i can't tell what the fingering is for that chord. what is it? it has such a cool ring.

EDIT: you're pretty damn good.
Last edited by sisuphi at Jun 10, 2008,
#9
its a E/B6 with open strings! nice moves!
EDIT: i may have written that wrong, it may be B6/E i can never remember. either way iam obsessed with 6 chords, i think they have such a cool heavy sound when run through bit of overdrive/distortion.


i wish i wasn't at work so that i could go home and play. i'm really anxious to fix this thumb problem of mine (my muting has gotten so much better in one week alone now that i'm taking it slow). i just want to get my picking to a level where i'm not so hindered all the time. i can still play quickly if i want but it's noisy and i feel like it's undoing the muscle memory from all the practice i've put in.
Last edited by sisuphi at Jun 10, 2008,
#10
If you stop looking at practice as a "speed drill" or always in relation to how fast
you can go, then it will appear you're not going "backwards", just forwards.

I'm not saying that's what you do, but I think to a lot of people, their only metric
is how fast they can play something. I think that will tend to give the illusion you're
going "back" a lot. The reason is, you might have a "good" day or moment, but
you never adequetely covered the material in the first place in the quest for speed.
So, the next day, it appears you have to go "back", but in reality you just haven't
learned it well enough.

I spend most of my practice time at very moderate and/or slow metronome tempos.
Most of the time I'm making sure the notes are formed exactly like I want them,
there's no broken notes, no missed strings, no noise.... When you can play the notes
as you want them, you're playing the guitar, if you have little control of how a note
sounds, the guitar is playing you. I spend very little time on "speed drills". Just
enough. Because if I do enough work on note clarity, the speed takes care of itself.
#11
^ yeah, i haven't got much faster in the last coupla years (apart from very recently) but i still feel i've improved greatly. I think anyone who's heard me across those years would agree.

its a E/B6 with open strings! nice moves!
EDIT: i may have written that wrong, it may be B6/E i can never remember. either way iam obsessed with 6 chords, i think they have such a cool heavy sound when run through bit of overdrive/distortion.


In this case i think of it as an E69, just because of the two Es and the next chord being roughly A major.
#12
Quote by sisuphi
It seems that as I practice and become more conscious of mistakes that I am making, I have to "go back" and play really slowly quite a substantial amount in order to fix any bad habits i have (muting, thumb touching string). does anyone else find this to be the case? as in, almost like having to reconstruct your guitar technique each time to fix a mistake?

it's not as dire as all that, i have just noticed recently that i have been spending alot of time at 40bpm (eighth notes) when three months ago i was practicing 115 bpm (16ths).

EDIT: it's also quite annoying to be somewhat knowledgeable about theory and be inhibited by technique. almost like i have the mental side down, now i need to work on the physical side.


At least your doing the right thing and are aware of yourself and your not playing sloppy at fast speeds like so many others. Your doing the right thing just keep working you will get there. Its frustrating at times. I'm in the same boat as you but you will be better in the long run by far than if you keep playing with those little mistakes. Keep calm and don't rush your progress or compare yourself with others just wory about your technique like your doing. You definatly sound like you have the right idea.
#13
edg, man that's funny that you say that because i had that realization today on my drive home from work. guitar playing isn't metric -i.e. quantitative, its qualitative.

that's a cool voicing of E69! i didn't even catch that. i've recently begun to understand theory in depth. so far i think everything i have said is somewhat accurate!


thanks for the words you guys.