#1
So, my band needs to record drums, which are downstairs, onto my computer, which is firmly rooted upstiars. Now, i can get a mic to within 7 feet of the set, but it doesnt sound great. So, first off, what are effective methods of recording and micing drums, and, secondly, what is the best solution to my problem?
#2
A Laptop for the problem, and I don't know much about micing drums except the bass drum where you want an egg shape and you want it INSIDE the drum.
#3
move the drums 7 feet over...or move them closer to the computer?
#4
The best way, in my experience, to record drums is this:

- have the snare and each tom miced seperately, with a clamp on mic, or mic on a stand, with the mic in such a position that it is facing the head, but wont get in the way when u are playing.

- for the bass drum/drums, place a mic inside the shell. depending on the sound you want, add or remove padding inside the drum. you can also remove the front resonator head if you wish. i find this helps reduce unwanted noise on the recordings.

- for cymbals and hi hits, i just use 2 overhead mics that hang about 3-4 feet above the drummer.

- we also used another mic we call the "room mic". it was a very sensitive mic, so we placed in the next room over from the drums. this gave everything a little bit more of a natural echo sound.

i think we had 13 mics in total for our kit. sounded awesome. also, we found its better to record drums on a hard surface, like hardwood, rather than a soft surface, like carpet.

as to your problem, you can either get a super long cable (we had 50 and 75 footers), get a laptop, or move your drums.
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#5
Quote by PinkFloyd73
So, my band needs to record drums, which are downstairs, onto my computer, which is firmly rooted upstiars. Now, i can get a mic to within 7 feet of the set, but it doesnt sound great. So, first off, what are effective methods of recording and micing drums, and, secondly, what is the best solution to my problem?



You are going to have to move your computer to the drum set man. That is just logic. Also you are going to need allot more than one microphone, the more the better... but atleast four and possibly a compressor.

the bass drum goes inside of the drum, and the rest of the microphones are handing from stands. It's a bitch to mic it correctly. I had and issue with one microphone and had to go and check all of them. It's a pain in the ass. There is reason why I like smaller bands better than large ones. The less players, the less systematical issues you can have.
Last edited by silentdud at Jun 10, 2008,
#6
An interface could help incredibly with reducing cable distances...just make sure you get a nice long USB or Firewire cable to bridge the gap (monoprice is a good place to get it without getting ripped off).

And +1 to using multiple microphones.
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#7
Ya i only have one mic, currently, and my band has no money to score some more...and we need to get a demo to shop out to dff. places...
#8
you can record drums with just one mic.
Type it in on google something related to it theyve got some good advice.

I mean, it wont sound brilliant and you'll have to do LOADS of tweaking with the mix, blending tracks and stuff just to bring out the bass drum and snare etc.

From experience, recording with 1 mic is very tough, but if you stick the mic somewhere near the snare it should pick up most of the kit nicely. It still wont sound great but if its all youve got...

Just experiment, do a whole load of test recordings and see where the mic sounds best. then keep it there.
#9
ya, thats all weve got for now, until we get both longer cords and a few more mics, were sorta strapped for cash.
#10
Get the drumset well tuned, get it in a good room with good acoustics, play around with the mic to try and find a sweet spot. If your drummer is any good and can play the kit with good dynamics, it should sound good. A good drummer will sound like a good drummer no matter what.
#11
simple solution - buy antother XLR cable and plug one into the other, then your cable will be twice as long.


as for recording drums, you're going to probably need 2 mics, but if you try, you could mic them with one. I've gotten decent results with a condensor right in above my snare and an SM57 in the bass drum. I've also put a 57 on the floor, right next to the bass pedal. Just try everything and see what works.
#12
You can get some extension cables for the XLR mics...but IMO it would be easy enough to move the desktop computer to where the drums are...

You would be better off recording with two mics...one will work but a min. of 3 is needed IMO

Two overheads and one kick

your average set uses 8 mics so that you can capture each pad on its own track. This makes the ending track sound amazing.
#13
Quote by Johnny Trash
you can record drums with just one mic.
Type it in on google something related to it theyve got some good advice.

I mean, it wont sound brilliant and you'll have to do LOADS of tweaking with the mix, blending tracks and stuff just to bring out the bass drum and snare etc.

From experience, recording with 1 mic is very tough, but if you stick the mic somewhere near the snare it should pick up most of the kit nicely. It still wont sound great but if its all youve got...

Just experiment, do a whole load of test recordings and see where the mic sounds best. then keep it there.



If I had ever heard a good drum recording with a single microphone I would have recommended it. You might want to try the drums for a song that doesn't rely on it too heavily where the drums are just to keep time.

However, from my experience the more complicated the set up the worse the recording you are going to get out of it is going to be. Every time you introduce a piece of equipment there is the potential it will mess up your recording or affect it in some way you don't realize until you are at the finished product.
Last edited by silentdud at Jun 11, 2008,