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#1
If you are a guitar world magazine reader you'd know exactly what im talking about. For years I have seen the Perfect Pitch advertisement. Its in there in literally every issue. On occasion I'll read through it, but most of the time I'll pass through it as it doesn't seem to exist. So when I got this month's issue in the mail I wondered for the first time, "Should I try this out? Does it really really work?"

So what I'm asking you is the following:
1. Are there advantages to being able to play by ear because of having perfect pitch?
2. Would you try out such a product?
3. Are there alternatives?
4. Is such a skill worth playing $139 for?

also:

5. Do you know how to play songs by ear?
5a. Does it help you with playing or music in general?
6. If so, how did you learn?

Any feedback is appreciated. Thanks
A-mart
#2
I suggest going here: http://www.ibreathemusic.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11398

it's a long thread with a kind of support group. These people have actually tried it and don't think it's a con unlike people here who will instantly say, " it's a big scam" without having tried it.
Even if you don't develop perfect pitch your ear will very much be improved so it probably would be worth it.
Originally posted by HarmlessLilF*ck
im not gay or anything, but if brad pitt asked me to stick my penis in him, i probably would.
#3
I don't have perfect pitch per se, but i can figure most songs out in a minute or two. it's totally worth it man, I never use tabs or sheet music or anything. I haven't tried this product but i want to so I can develop my ear better and properly.

edit: it does help A LOT in the music world in general. I didn't really "learn" how to do it, it's all natural

but i did develop my sense of pitch by starting with easy music like Nirvana and Foo Fighters for a couple years, then moving on to tougher stuff with more lead guitar.
an alternative so you wouldn't have to pay for it would be torrenting it if you were cool with illegal downloads.
Last edited by strat335 at Jun 10, 2008,
#4
There have been loads of threads on this before. The general conclusion is always that it may help you to achieve very very good relative pitch but it will NOT give you perfect pitch. You are either born with perfect pitch or not, but having good relative pitch can be very beneficial and there are lots of ways to get it that don't cost $139.
#6
is this the one where the dude's like "it's all aqbout hearing the color of the note"? Cause i downloaded that (bittorrent) and i mean i'm sure it would work for some people it seemed legit i just never got past the first few lessons.
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#7
There's no way I'd pay that much. I've never tried it out though, but I expect it's just a guy motivating you to practice. $139 for motivation to practice ear training?

Here's an exercise I started doing that doesn't require anything but your guitar and vocal chords, (and a willingness to hum some notes.) It's like doing to interval trainers online, but backwards. You sing the next note and check yourself on the guitar. Pick a note and play it. Then try to hum an interval, like a major 3rd or perfect 5th. Then play that note and see if you got it right. You can make it hard by changing keys or easy by picking intervals from the same root note. As a bonus, you develop you singing (or humming) ability.

Edit: By the way, there's some very good debate in that forum linked to above on page 24. This guy who is skeptic of needing perfect pitch at all seems to be really well versed on the topic.
GANGSTAAAAAAS!

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Quote by SG6578
That is regular hard maple...I'm 100% f*cking d*ck licking sure.
Last edited by Third3ye at Jun 10, 2008,
#8
Hey,

I have it. I've only made some lessons thus far, but his theory, if not correct, at least is viable. He says that as both electromagnetic waves (in this case the visible ones) and soun d waves have a spectrum, and seeing that you can associate certains frequencies/wave lenghts (translated from Portuguese to English, so prolly not correct. I'm referring to λ from the electromagnetic spectrum to certain colours and that you have developed the ability to associate names with those colours, you are also able to associate certain frequencies/wave lenghts from the sound spectrum (the audible one, of course) to certain notes and name them, just like you do with colours.

Thus far it has improved my ability to listen to somethings I wouldn't notice before... SO it's good, at least for that.
#9
Quote by Eirien
There have been loads of threads on this before. The general conclusion is always that it may help you to achieve very very good relative pitch but it will NOT give you perfect pitch. You are either born with perfect pitch or not, but having good relative pitch can be very beneficial and there are lots of ways to get it that don't cost $139.


Explain to me why you have to be born with it and cant attain it? If you hear a note and know what it is with no refrence point you have perfect pitch, whether you are born with it or not.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#10
:stickpoke My microwave makes a consistant humming sound when it's on, so I hum the microwave's major scale. Microwaves: The sound of the future.
#11
it is definitely useful to have a good ear. if you hear a riff in your head and you are able to identify (even if relatively) the intervals between them, then presumably you could play exactly what was in your head. i think that's the goal of every musician, thus, having good aural skills is defnitely an extremely valuable tool.
#12
Quote by Phobos&Deimos
:stickpoke My microwave makes a consistant humming sound when it's on, so I hum the microwave's major scale. Microwaves: The sound of the future.


You realize that microwaves are electromagnetic waves, thus a combination of electric fields and magnetic fields, which means you can't hear them. Right?

That's what I thought.
#13
Quote by Zealot's Fire
You realize that microwaves are electromagnetic waves, thus a combination of electric fields and magnetic fields, which means you can't hear them. Right?

That's what I thought.


unless you get magnetic/metallic ear implants, then that shiz would warp the brain black holes stylez.
#14
Quote by sisuphi
unless you get magnetic/metallic ear implants, then that shiz would warp the brain black holes stylez.


And where do you get those implants? In Chuck Norris' emporium?
#17
Quote by radiantmoon
Explain to me why you have to be born with it and cant attain it?
That's just the way it works.

Some people, including me, have developed what I call "imperfect pitch," where, after many years of playing certain notes, can recognize them without a reference. I would not call this perfect pitch because I can't recognize when the note is out by a few cents; someone with perfect pitch can.
#18
Quote by Zealot's Fire
You realize that microwaves are electromagnetic waves, thus a combination of electric fields and magnetic fields, which means you can't hear them. Right?

That's what I thought.


You realize that I was talking about Microwave Ovens, right?
#19
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That's just the way it works.

Some people, including me, have developed what I call "imperfect pitch," where, after many years of playing certain notes, can recognize them without a reference. I would not call this perfect pitch because I can't recognize when the note is out by a few cents; someone with perfect pitch can.


i think it's some kind of deep seeded recessive gene. but thats just my 2 cents, i could be totally wrong. in any case, i think an excellent relative pitch is just as important if not moreso than perfect pitch.

perfect pitch drives you nuts, i've said it before and i'll say it again "you think you want it until you have it" i had a friend who couldn't stand to listen to the radio because guitars don't have perfect intonation.
#21
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That's just the way it works.

Some people, including me, have developed what I call "imperfect pitch," where, after many years of playing certain notes, can recognize them without a reference. I would not call this perfect pitch because I can't recognize when the note is out by a few cents; someone with perfect pitch can.


I am in the same boat as you with your so called imperfect pitch. But its possible that there are people out there that can tell if its out by a few cents and have not been born with it. You cant say it cant be acheived because maybe it has, we dont know every single person in the world. The fact that you can recognise pitches proves the ear can be developed and maybe there are peole out there who have developed it perfectly.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#22
Quote by Phobos&Deimos
You realize that I was talking about Microwave Ovens, right?


Microwave ovens work with microwaves :P

I'm just messing with you
#23
My PC fan is humming a middle G right now. When I listen to the radio, every 5 to 7 songs I have to switch channels because somebody's put on a friggin' amateur that calls him/herself an artist. It almost physically hurts. It is a curse.

Yet, I'm not sure I have absolute pitch.

I can name notes without reference, but sometimes I am wrong and I only realize it a while later. I can accurately tune an instrument, but it's easier to do it from a distance of the sound source. My harmony teacher told me about a guy who couldn't bear listening to vinyl records because they turn at different speeds than when recorded. I don't have that problem as long as the speed is constant.

It's like when I concentrate I can hear a perfect-pitched note faintly in my head, as a dying echo. I like to concentrate on a middle A, but I can do it with any note within a certain range. I've never done anything special to acquire this ability. I've had it since before I can remember. And it has definitely helped me with any musical activity I've ever done. So I guess it's a gift too.

I'm searching the net for definitions about relative and absolute pitch. So far I fit most definitions of relative pitch, but I have never trained my ear. I could also have bad, unreliable absolute pitch. Maybe this is the imperfect pitch that you were talking about earlier, Sue. Except that you seem to have trained yours...
Last edited by Withakay at Jun 12, 2008,
#24
Quote by Withakay
Stuff
It seems to me that you've got perfect pitch but have not trianed yours.


What? You have to train it?

Well of course. You may be born with the ability to recognize a C note, but someone still has to teach you, "This is a C note, now remember that forever."
#25
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I've heard those people are crazy. They'll say things like, "You want to know what note a revving lawnmower engine makes?"


Its a C
Up the Punx!
#26
Quote by radiantmoon
I am in the same boat as you with your so called imperfect pitch. But its possible that there are people out there that can tell if its out by a few cents and have not been born with it. You cant say it cant be acheived because maybe it has, we dont know every single person in the world. The fact that you can recognise pitches proves the ear can be developed and maybe there are peole out there who have developed it perfectly.

I fall with you on this one; I was not born with the ability but can do everything that's been described. I can get any note correct without a reference, I can learn things by ear with ease, and I can tell when things are slightly off.

I also enjoy telling people the pitches of lawnmowers, birds, car horns and the like.
#27
Perfect pitch will either make you or break you.

My non-musical friend who has perfect pitch becomes physically ill at times when listening to music (for instance, if the band on the recording tuned off of an untuned piano). He does not listen to music any more.

I can't say whether I have developed perfect pitch, or if it's always been there. I'd say it's both. It wasn't until a year or so ago that it slowly started coming to me. I woke up once in the middle of the night with a distant pitch in my head (the distance here is difficult to explain...it's there, but since it is auditory, I have no way of clearly thinking about it, if that makes any sense) and said to myself, that's a Db. Sure enough.

The other 11 pitches fell into place after that.

On a side note, I was thinking about a way of training someone perfect pitch. There are twelve pitches in traditional western music, right? There are twelve months on our calander, right? So, for those who haven't already got perfect pitch, they can listen to and hum, let's say, a G for one hour every night in January. Do the same for the other twelve.

Your mind would automatically associate the month of January to a G. So, when you hear someone play a G, you can ask yourself: "What month does that remind me of...January! I was studying G that month! IT'S AN EFFING G!" By the same token, if someone asks you to produce a G, think January, and the note will come.

I don't know how well this will work...I'd try it on myself, but I've already got perfect pitch. Any UG'er up for the task?
#28
^I would somewhat like to be able to do that, even if it's just for show off :P Still, should be pretty useful on the real deal.
#29
So when people talk to someone with absolute pitch, do they notice them in or out of key? Like maybe a certain person switches to E minor when he's pissed, but is in F major when he's happy about something. ??

Absolute pitch people. Answers please?

Edit: About that training by the month thing... eh. The thing is, we've already heard every note so many times and been through each month so many times, I don't think they'd pair up. Maybe if you did it with a 3rd stimuli that was present only when you trained?
GANGSTAAAAAAS!

Chika! Chika! YEAH YEAH!

Quote by SG6578
That is regular hard maple...I'm 100% f*cking d*ck licking sure.
Last edited by Third3ye at Jun 12, 2008,
#30
Quote by 5/4
Any UG'er up for the task?
C for July...what the hell, why not!

Should I sing one pitch or the same note in multiple octaves? Or should I start out easy and get more complex?
#31
You know, thinking about how having absolute pitch can drive people crazy, it doesn't make sense to me. Because we can hear a range or frequencies, and it's the intervals between them that makes the nice sounds. So when the pitch is a little off, it's just off the spot where humans marked it and decided "that's an A." The only explanation I can think of for this is that people born with absolute pitch were the first to decide which tones were the most pleasing, and so those got named.
GANGSTAAAAAAS!

Chika! Chika! YEAH YEAH!

Quote by SG6578
That is regular hard maple...I'm 100% f*cking d*ck licking sure.
#32
Quote by bangoodcharlote
C for July...what the hell, why not!

Should I sing one pitch or the same note in multiple octaves? Or should I start out easy and get more complex?


Well, since this has never been done before, I imagine you should try a few differant ways.

Maybe something like...listen to a droning C for 10 minutes, then work on humming that pitch for 5, and repeating for an hour. When humming, try doing so in as many octaves as you can.

But hell, I don't know; like I say, this has never been done before to my knowledge.

Hmm, maybe every day before you get ready to do the ear training, try giving the C yourself. See if there is improvement in your accuracy.

If there aren't any results by the end of the month...consider me the purveyor of dumb ideas.
#33
Quote by Third3ye
So when people talk to someone with absolute pitch, do they notice them in or out of key? Like maybe a certain person switches to E minor when he's pissed, but is in F major when he's happy about something. ??

Absolute pitch people. Answers please?

Edit: About that training by the month thing... eh. The thing is, we've already heard every note so many times and been through each month so many times, I don't think they'd pair up. Maybe if you did it with a 3rd stimuli that was present only when you trained?


Good idea on the third stimuli. Perhaps this can be done concurently with the color/pitch system?

UG deserves a Nobel Prize if this works.
#35
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I suggest using a MIDI or synthetic source rather than a potentially out-of-tune guitar.


When I said droning C, I was thinking of my electric organ.

New idea: on top of the aural stimuli, also use visual (colors), and physical (for instance, when studying the C in January which could also be orange, open and close your right hand).

I suppose you could also use taste/smell. For instance, chew on a banana or smell vanilla oil.

This is probably getting ridiculous...but I'm beginning to think that this could work.
#36
The thing that separates our training from perfect pitch is that we could lose the ability to recognize the pitch. That makes it "imperfect" as opposed to perfect pitch.
#37
Quote by 5/4
When I said droning C, I was thinking of my electric organ.

New idea: on top of the aural stimuli, also use visual (colors), and physical (for instance, when studying the C in January which could also be orange, open and close your right hand).

I suppose you could also use taste/smell. For instance, chew on a banana or smell vanilla oil.

This is probably getting ridiculous...but I'm beginning to think that this could work.


That's actually not ridiculous. The more 'coding' you do, the more committed to memory it will be. It's basically the same way all memory works, like using special tricks to remember math formulas and such. I'd be more skeptical of doing it by months of the year because obviously it'd take a whole year to do and there isn't enough differentiation between them.
GANGSTAAAAAAS!

Chika! Chika! YEAH YEAH!

Quote by SG6578
That is regular hard maple...I'm 100% f*cking d*ck licking sure.
#38
Quote by Third3ye
That's actually not ridiculous. The more 'coding' you do, the more committed to memory it will be. It's basically the same way all memory works, like using special tricks to remember math formulas and such. I'd be more skeptical of doing it by months of the year because obviously it'd take a whole year to do and there isn't enough differentiation between them.


The month system is convenient because it gives you a practice regiment in bold, and it ensures that you'll spend ample amount of time on each pitch.

We'll see how BGC does.
#40
Quote by :-D
I fall with you on this one; I was not born with the ability but can do everything that's been described. I can get any note correct without a reference, I can learn things by ear with ease, and I can tell when things are slightly off.

I also enjoy telling people the pitches of lawnmowers, birds, car horns and the like.


How did you develop your ability?
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
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