#1
when soloing do many people think about each individual chord being played or the overal key more? for example...

Fmin, Bb min, Ab Maj and Db maj.... the chords in smells like teen spirit... when curt does his guitar solo.... is he just thinking (most likely) key of F min and hits "safe notes" like F Ab and C from time to time.... or was he really paying close attention to the quick chord changes and playing notes that fit their arpegios? no dumb ass answers please, if you don't know, don't post.
#2
Quote by xmacattack18
when soloing do many people think about each individual chord being played or the overal key more? for example...

Fmin, Bb min, Ab Maj and Db maj.... the chords in smells like teen spirit... when curt does his guitar solo.... is he just thinking (most likely) key of F min and hits "safe notes" like F Ab and C from time to time.... or was he really paying close attention to the quick chord changes and playing notes that fit their arpegios? no dumb ass answers please, if you don't know, don't post.



To be perfectly honest with you (i'm a Nirvana freak btw) I honestly don't remember reading anything about Kurt EVER learning anything about theory. He just played what sounded good really.

Although to answer you question, your solo will sound more unique if you follow the invdividual chords being played, rather then just staying in one key. This also allows you to sometimes solo out of a different key.
#3
I can't imagine him concerning himself what chords are playing over the top. Some guitarists would though. Its certainly a common technique. Particularly if you are changing key or changing mode in a solo.
#4
Although to answer you question, your solo will sound more unique if you follow the invdividual chords being played, rather then just staying in one key. This also allows you to sometimes solo out of a different key.


99% of the time, outside of art music, the chords are all in a key. Focusing on the chords in the same as playing inside the key.
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#5
Kurt knew theory?

Just kidding.

Yes, that's what most people do. If you think about it even more, you're doing a lot of modal work. I'm going to give an examp from an A minor 12 bar blues sort of thing, at least what I do with it.

Am - Dm - E7 are your chords.

Over Am, you would most likely improvise over the A minor natural scale, or pentatonic, whichever you prefer.

Over Dm, you would do a D Dorian sort of thing, emphasizing D F and A. If you want to be adventurous, you can do the D minor scale, which contains a Bflat. I use the Bflat as a quick passing note.

Over E7 most people say "use Phrygian Dominant". This works out well, but if you don't know modes, then just make it your main concern to hit the notes of the E7 chord (E G# B D), preferably the leading note (G#).
Some might not agree with this, but I can make it work to good effect.

tl;dr Yes most experienced musicians or ones who know what they're doing think about the chord changes. This makes the music sound better imo. Look up Marty Friedman's Melodic Control video, he talks about this in detail.
#6
Quote by xmacattack18
when soloing do many people think about each individual chord being played or the overal key more? for example...

Fmin, Bb min, Ab Maj and Db maj.... the chords in smells like teen spirit... when curt does his guitar solo.... is he just thinking (most likely) key of F min and hits "safe notes" like F Ab and C from time to time.... or was he really paying close attention to the quick chord changes and playing notes that fit their arpegios? no dumb ass answers please, if you don't know, don't post.


I don't think he was concerned with "safe" notes. He played what he felt and heard. He probably knew the F minor scale patterns, used his ears and played.

I think he was more focused on artistic expression, and not so much on analysis.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by one vision
Kurt knew theory?

Just kidding.

Yes, that's what most people do. If you think about it even more, you're doing a lot of modal work. I'm going to give an examp from an A minor 12 bar blues sort of thing, at least what I do with it.

Am - Dm - E7 are your chords.

Over Am, you would most likely improvise over the A minor natural scale, or pentatonic, whichever you prefer.

Over Dm, you would do a D Dorian sort of thing, emphasizing D F and A. If you want to be adventurous, you can do the D minor scale, which contains a Bflat. I use the Bflat as a quick passing note.

Over E7 most people say "use Phrygian Dominant". This works out well, but if you don't know modes, then just make it your main concern to hit the notes of the E7 chord (E G# B D), preferably the leading note (G#).
Some might not agree with this, but I can make it work to good effect.

tl;dr Yes most experienced musicians or ones who know what they're doing think about the chord changes. This makes the music sound better imo. Look up Marty Friedman's Melodic Control video, he talks about this in detail.


That progression is not modal, and you are not using modes. You are playing A minor, possibly switching to A harmonic minor over the E7, and throwing in some (possibly a lot) of chromatic tones, if you feel like it.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by Guitarfreak777
No it is not sir, if you solo following the chords it will bring more attention to the chord changes.


This contradicts what I said how?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis
That progression is not modal, and you are not using modes. You are playing A minor, possibly switching to A harmonic minor over the E7, and throwing in some (possibly a lot) of chromatic tones, if you feel like it.

I know the progression isn't modal. I'm just saying that I use D dorian over the Dm chord, and E phrygian dominant over E7. This works out to be the notes A harmonic minor.
#11
Quote by Guitarfreak777
To be perfectly honest with you (i'm a Nirvana freak btw) I honestly don't remember reading anything about Kurt EVER learning anything about theory. He just played what sounded good really.

Although to answer you question, your solo will sound more unique if you follow the invdividual chords being played, rather then just staying in one key. This also allows you to sometimes solo out of a different key.

Dude he was taught by a professional Guitarist in his teens for 2 years.

He never had it hard, he was just a cry baby who got off his head on heroin and lost his mind.
#12
Quote by JoshCrawford
Dude he was taught by a professional Guitarist in his teens for 2 years.

He never had it hard, he was just a cry baby who got off his head on heroin and lost his mind.



Who was he taught by?
#13
ok I see what your saying guys... but as far as my "safe" notes... should I just stick the the basic triad of the key or should I really be thinking about the safe notes for the individual chords in the progression... even though they are going really quick... it seems to me that kurt focused on the triad of just f min.... and I'm not only talking him but other musicians too like the the chili pepper solos and stuff.
#14
Think about playing what sounds good to you and your listeners. Thats vague I know but you find these answers out by jamming along with the song or the chord structures you have laid out. But, if you want my personaly opinion to the answer to your question. Play within the scale for now if you are not used to soloing over odd chords. You can change your soloing technique over time to altering your notes to fit the scale, mode or arppegio of each individual chord. Playing guitar is about slow and natural progression, not forcing anything out.
#15
how about melody of lyrics.... do those usually try to hit safe notes of indiviual chords or is it a mixture of the full key and individual chords?
#17
But in Teen Spirit, the solo just mimics the vocal melody. I'm no Nirvana expert, but I'd say Kurt approached his solo writing much like he approached vocal writing. Singers definitely don't need to know the theory behind what they sing, they just sing it.
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#18
Quote by one vision
I know the progression isn't modal. I'm just saying that I use D dorian over the Dm chord, and E phrygian dominant over E7


No, you don't. You're using A minor and A harmonic minor, respectively. You aren't playing modally.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Quote by Third3ye
But in Teen Spirit, the solo just mimics the vocal melody. I'm no Nirvana expert, but I'd say Kurt approached his solo writing much like he approached vocal writing. Singers definitely don't need to know the theory behind what they sing, they just sing it.



I'd say thats what it was as well.
#20
Quote by Archeo Avis
No, you don't. You're using A minor and A harmonic minor, respectively. You aren't playing modally.

Over the Dm chord, I put emphasis on D, F and A, while using E, G, B and C as passing tones. This is the scale of D dorian, the notes also fit into the scale of A natural minor. I didn't say it was a modal progression, it's just easier to think of it like this, for me at least. Same goes for E phrygian dominant. E phyigian dominant has the same notes as A harmonic minor, just starting on a different note. If I think of it this way, it gives my improvisation more variety even though I use the same notes, because it's the order of the notes that differ, for me at least. Maybe you don't think of it this way, but it's pretty much the same, just depends on how you visualize it.
#21
Quote by one vision
Over the Dm chord, I put emphasis on D, F and A, while using E, G, B and C as passing tones. This is the scale of D dorian, the notes also fit into the scale of A natural minor. I didn't say it was a modal progression, it's just easier to think of it like this, for me at least. Same goes for E phrygian dominant. E phyigian dominant has the same notes as A harmonic minor, just starting on a different note. If I think of it this way, it gives my improvisation more variety even though I use the same notes, because it's the order of the notes that differ, for me at least. Maybe you don't think of it this way, but it's pretty much the same, just depends on how you visualize it.


You can think of it in whatever way you find easier, but you are not playing D dorian and E phrygian dominant. It doesn't matter what order you play the notes in; if the progression in A minor, you are playing A minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#22
I see what you're saying. I know it all resolves to A. I just find it easier, and I've seen people explain it this way, which helped me understand improvisation when I started it. It's easier to say "play D dorian over Dm" rather than "play the A minor scale with emphasis on D F A over Dm". It just lets me put my thoughts into a coherent and clean err... way of saying it. Meh. I completely understand where you're coming from with this though.
#23
Quote by one vision
I see what you're saying. I know it all resolves to A. I just find it easier, and I've seen people explain it this way, which helped me understand improvisation when I started it. It's easier to say "play D dorian over Dm" rather than "play the A minor scale with emphasis on D F A over Dm". It just lets me put my thoughts into a coherent and clean err... way of saying it. Meh. I completely understand where you're coming from with this though.


There's nothing wrong with thinking about it that way if it makes it easier (and you understand what you're doing), but I'd refrain from actually describing it that way to someone who's just getting into music theory.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.