#1
Hey all,

I mostly play metal(yes I am so cliched) and other hard types of rock. So I know the minor scales(melodic minor, natural minor, harmonic minor) pretty well, and the some major scale type stuff(Ionian and Mixolydian modes). But my playing is starting to get pretty stale, I want to try mixing it up, learning some really weird(to be played in metal) scales. But I don't know what to start with? Right away I want something I could use to write sort of a humorous clown/circus song...but I've no clue what to use.

I would really appreciate any suggestions, thanks.

P.S. If I like a suggestion, I'll follow it and record either a song or a short piece of improvisation and upload it so you can hear what you have helped me achieve.
Chaos

Quote by Phobos&Deimos
I never brag about how incredibly awesome I am.

#2
Circus music is mostly chromatics based around the major scale.
And theres usually that staccato style rhthym, like long bass staccato treble.

And dont go looking for new scales. The major scale is perfectly fine. Work on your phrasing and your melodic control.
#4
Quote by Opalyptica
Try learning all your modes
Phrygian + Locrain may be a good idea



I know both of them..not as good as I know what I listed above but I know them. But I kind of want to steer clear of them right now as they are used ALOT in metal. I'm scared of playing the same exercises and scales etc... that most other metal musicians do, because I don't want to end up sounding stale and un-original like a lot of musicians end up.

And demonofthenigh :
The major scale may be fine...for you... or other people. But I want to experiment...its hard to experiment if I only play modes based on the major scale. Thanks for the tip on the chromatics though.
Chaos

Quote by Phobos&Deimos
I never brag about how incredibly awesome I am.

#5
Quote by Sykonatiac
And demonofthenigh :
The major scale may be fine...for you... or other people. But I want to experiment...its hard to experiment if I only play modes based on the major scale. Thanks for the tip on the chromatics though.
To experiment, try playing out of key notes and accidentals. If you really want new sounds, see what happens if you say play a m6 over a major chord for example. Or a b5 over just about any chord. Dont go looking for new scales. Remember, you have 12 notes (more if you count micro-tonal notes), learn how to use all 13 of them.

And musicians sound stale beause their phrasing and their note choice sucks, not because they picked the wrong scale.
#6
Quote by demonofthenight
To experiment, try playing out of key notes and accidentals. If you really want new sounds, see what happens if you say play a m6 over a major chord for example. Or a b5 over just about any chord. Dont go looking for new scales. Remember, you have 12 notes (more if you count micro-tonal notes), learn how to use all 13 of them.

And musicians sound stale beause their phrasing and their note choice sucks, not because they picked the wrong scale.



I understand what you're getting at there, and I agree...this is what I usually do. However, sometimes when I'm messing around with a different mode/scale I'll come across ways the notes work together that I would never have thought of. Like when I first moved from the Natural minor scale to Harmonic minor, playing the sharped 7th and the 8th right after(or vice versa) gave me a sound I never thought of on my own. I may have figured that out on my own, but maybe not.

I don't "play" using scales. I just play whatever I feel/hear, but I've found it useful time and time again to do scales during practice.

But like I said, I understand totally what you're saying.
Chaos

Quote by Phobos&Deimos
I never brag about how incredibly awesome I am.

#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Get a scalefinder and look up some of the Eastern pentatonic scales.
No

and check out the links in bangoodcharlote signature.
#9
Quote by demonofthenight
No

and check out the links in bangoodcharlote signature.


Awesome. I've been looking for that Marty video for a long freaking time.
Chaos

Quote by Phobos&Deimos
I never brag about how incredibly awesome I am.

#10
Don't forget that there are modes of Harmonic and Melodic minor, pretty much all of which sound a lot more interesting than standard major-based modes.

Phrygian dominant is the one you hear most often, you can think of it as the notes of the Harmonic Minor starting from V, so it's normal Phrygian with a natural 3rd.

EDIT: And don't be afraid to play a little outside. You can do some really cool stuff with chord substitutions, or simply just moving scales around a few frets. Look up Jimmy Herring on YouTube, he's my guitar idol and he's a god of outside playing.