#1
Hi,
I just noticed that when I play a high E, the low E string starts to vibrate too and produces a very annoying sound which becomes louder and louder. The only way to stop it is to mute the string by putting a finger on it. Is there a solution to this?

I wondered if this is normal. I guess it's some weird effect, because their frequency is exactly doubled, but I don't really know.
#3
well that never happens with me but im almos never in standard tuning. i learned something in science this year :O about somethin with frequencies that makes things with the same frequency vibrate but i forget what its called. so yes its normal. try using drop d or something
#5
Reminds of when I played bass. If I played really loud and hit the right note, that frequency would somehow magically pluck one of the strings on my acoustic sitting in the stand across the room. Not just vibrate, but actually pluck quite clearly.

I'm sorry this doesn't really help, but I just thought it was weird.
#6
Yes, things that vibrate at the same frequency make eachother vibrate, doesn't happen on my electric though. If you hold a G on the low E string the G string should vibrate too. Not much you can do about it except drop D, or palm muting the lower E string when playing high.
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#7
That shouldn't be a big effect. It's harmonics, the vibration of the high E string causes to low one to vibrate along with it. Buy normally such an effect wouldn't be very strong, especially not between strings where there's a 2 octave difference. My guess would be that your strings are pretty loose so lowering the bridge might help.

The effect is pretty normal though. Another possibility is that you've written some awsome solo in which you play the E for about 15 seconds. Then it's not much trouble to mute the low E string.
#8
Quote by MaXiMuse
I don`t think that`s normal, do you also have it when you hit the F?

quick answer for him: NO
because there's no open F
#9
Quote by Base Ics
quick answer for him: NO
because there's no open F


i think he meant first fret of the 6th string but ok
#10
Quote by soccerguy6494
well that never happens with me but im almos never in standard tuning. i learned something in science this year :O about somethin with frequencies that makes things with the same frequency vibrate but i forget what its called. so yes its normal. try using drop d or something


Resonance
#12
it's called resonance; when the frequency of one object matches that of another, causing the stationary object (in this case the low E) to vibrate.

I've had this happen before and it went away when I took it in to get a "check-up" and strings changed.

Try changing the low E only and as mentioned before, checking for loose screws. It's probably not anything with the effects, merely a characteristic of sound physics.
#14
sympathetic resonance actually, caused by sympathetic frequencies. Octaves do it the best, but 5th's do it slightly as well due to the overtones that are resonated when you play a note. To TS: Yes this is normal-- good guitarists learn to deal with this by muting (but sometimes it's wanted, depending on what you want).
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#15
Yeah, I already played all the open strings a octave lower/higher, but they do not ring. I think I can avoid the problem by playing less loud, but it's only a 15W amp and I'm hardly reaching 75dB. Oh and I just figured that by turning the gain down the problem vanishes; but I still think it's a pretty interesting phenomenon.

EDIT: I think, I'll change the strings soon (they've been on the guitar for a year now) even though I haven't played a lot.
Last edited by Fischkopf_III at Jun 11, 2008,
#16
Quote by thepagesaretorn
sympathetic resonance actually, caused by sympathetic frequencies. Octaves do it the best, but 5th's do it slightly as well due to the overtones that are resonated when you play a note. To TS: Yes this is normal-- good guitarists learn to deal with this by muting (but sometimes it's wanted, depending on what you want).


He's totally right, it happens to me as well. To "fix" it, I just always mute the strings that I don't want to ring. It took me some time to learn it correctly, but your playing will be significantly better after that, and a lot cleaner.
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#17
same thing happens to me when i tunr down half a step
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#18
Quote by Fischkopf_III
Hi,
I just noticed that when I play a high E, the low E string starts to vibrate too and produces a very annoying sound which becomes louder and louder. The only way to stop it is to mute the string by putting a finger on it. Is there a solution to this?

I wondered if this is normal. I guess it's some weird effect, because their frequency is exactly doubled, but I don't really know.


The statement in bold is the solution to your problem. Even if you set your guitar to discourage resonance on the open 1st and 6th string, some strings are still going to resonate at certain frequencies with other strings.

Good muting techniques is one of the few skills that differ in their relevance between electric and acoustic guitars.
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#19
thats never happened to me but sume times when i hit the d string when im on my amp it makes the d string on my accoustic vibrate
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#21
Quote by The daltonator
stop smokin crack maybe????


Thx, that might help...


To everyone else: Thanks for the replies; I'll just decrease the gain (helps a lot) and learn how to mute when I get better.
#23
Quote by Fischkopf_III
Yeah, I already played all the open strings a octave lower/higher, but they do not ring. I think I can avoid the problem by playing less loud, but it's only a 15W amp and I'm hardly reaching 75dB. Oh and I just figured that by turning the gain down the problem vanishes; but I still think it's a pretty interesting phenomenon.

EDIT: I think, I'll change the strings soon (they've been on the guitar for a year now) even though I haven't played a lot.

O.O a YEAR!!! jeez, even i ain't that bad and im a bloody student without a job lol.

you need to learn to mute any strings you aren't playing when you play, or you will get feedback, thus causing sloppy songs. use the palm of your picking hand to do this (palm muting).
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#24
Quote by Fischkopf_III
To everyone else: Thanks for the replies; I'll just decrease the gain (helps a lot) and learn how to mute when I get better.


Learn how to mute as early as possible. Some players can effectively mute strings with their fretting hand only just by altering the angle/position they fret notes at. This is extremely helpful for hammer-on/pull-off licks, trills and tapping.
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