#1
So, ive got this real problem where i cant seeiously focus on practicing scales and stuff for more than, like, 30mins. And i also lose motivation for this sort of practice (exercises and a metronome stuff) pretty fast. Should i just give up now, or is there a way to keep myself focused and motivated. Help me UG people!!!
#2
Don't practice scales then; practice things that you actually want to play that push your abilities. What sort of music do you enjoy playing and what can you play already?
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#3
I sorta just play the same stuff all the time.... I play lots of metal, like trivium and metallica and stuff, but i never learn the solos cause im just like " thats wayyy to hard". TBH, some of the rythm can be quite chalenging, but when ur used to it and thats all you play, it doesnt push you and you dont improve. So thats why i try n practice exercises, to improve my lead skills so i will be able to play the solos. But as ive said i lose focus and get bored when i do that.....

But what ur sayin is try to learn the leads mabey, coz i fing that challenging? But would that not lead back to metronome practice to get them upto speed? Im pretty screwed.....
#4
Quote by Caol4000
But what ur sayin is try to learn the leads mabey, coz i fing that challenging? But would that not lead back to metronome practice to get them upto speed? Im pretty screwed.....


Well for learning fast, complicated things that's one of the only ways to get it done, the key difference is that with exercises it can get tedious and you're not really learning anything that you'll use, if you learn solos you have something musical to aim for and something you will/can use. Maybe you shouldn't go straight for Trivium if you're not used to playing lead things, go for newer metallica stuff and then later metallica and then you can work on Trivium and the like.

The main thing though is not to let yourself get too discouraged just because you can't play it that fast first thing; no one get's it right first time
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Well, youve given me some hope. Cheers!!! Youre advice is much apreciated.

Zaphod beeblebrox, giver of hope.

That were a bit cheesy were it not?
#6
That's ok, we all go through periods of "I can't get better", the key thing is not to loose hope and to just say to yourself:

"If Paul Gilbert can do it, who say's I can't?"

Staying motivated is difficult sometimes but the key thing is to always play for the enjoyment of the instrument; if you find yourself getting down on your own playing then just go and jam over a backing track or some simple blues, it always makes me feel better about my playing to just hit a bend and vibrato it until it fades out; that is the very essence of guitar!
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
Hey dudes. I have the EXACT same problem. I see videos of other guys playing on youtube or whatever and they all kick major ass and then I go try to play the same things and im horrible at it and cant do it and it gets me discouraged and frustrated sometimes. In all I maybe know only a few solos that are really easy but now I'm trying to learn some new harder stuff like Bodom (specifically Towards Dead End, Sixpounder, and Silent Night, Bodom Night.) or other stuff like Bodom with a lot of sweep picking and fast solos. So Zaphod, would you have any advice for learning sweeps? Cuz i try and try and just cant seem to get mine down. They're very sloppy sounding and I know I dont hit all the notes I should, and they just sound baddddd. So any advice on sweeping would be much appreciated
Metal for LIFE
#8
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=3mbx03mP5eg

That's one of the best sweeping lessons I've seen. The key really is in just slowing it down and practicing the motion until it becomes second nature. Beyond that there's not really a lot I can say without seeing your technique.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#9
lol I've seen that vid before actually

I guess it all comes down to me not really having any patience. That's a big issue I have when it comes to learning hard solos. So I guess that's really what I should work on. About how long do you think I should practice sweeps everyday?
Metal for LIFE
#10
Quote by archadia213
lol I've seen that vid before actually

I guess it all comes down to me not really having any patience. That's a big issue I have when it comes to learning hard solos. So I guess that's really what I should work on. About how long do you think I should practice sweeps everyday?


I say it's one of the best I've seen because it's the only video that really goes through the physical process of learning it and has some licks that you can learn for the first steps of the journey towards mastery.

No more than about an hour I would say, if you work on it longer than that you'll only end up getting very frustrated with the whole thing and I don't believe you'll learn much beyond then anyway.

You should only really practice as much as you feel you need to or even want to; there's no point pushing yourself to learn to do something if, when you're done, you got so fed up that you associate the technique with anger anyway. Or worse you could get so frustrated with it that you just give up learning it altogether.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Jun 11, 2008,
#11
oh alright that sounds pretty good to me! i just cant sit there for more than an hour and practice the same stuff over and over it starts to frustrate me and it gets very tiring. but i think about an hour or so sounds like a good amount of time.

thanks again bro and hopefully i can have sweeping down pretty soon!
Metal for LIFE
#12
This is advice given to me by a teacher I once had.

If you are losing focus quickly, you have to learn WHY you are losing focus. Next time you feel yourself start to, lose focus, try to make a note of what is distracting you. Do you want to play video games or go outside? Do you want to get some food? Etc. Then prepare in a way that you prevent this--For the first example, start playing immediately after finishing doing one of those for a while. If you want food, eat before you start to play or bring a snack with you. In some In some cases you may just not want to play guitar anymore. If this is routinely the case for you, here's one way of getting through it. You said you can't go for more than an hour. If you want to go longer, try this. For a week, every day keep a timer, and Play for one hour and five minutes. 5 minutes is short enough that it shouldn't seem too different. Then after that week, take a few days where you keep a stopwatch to time how long you play, but don't set the amount of time you play. Hopefully, you'll hit that 65 minutes that you've been doing for a week. If not, try again for a week. If you did, do the same thing but with 70 minutes. Just a few little ideas. Hopefully they help. If not, sorry.
#14
Hey Caol4000,

How's the life going? I used to be like that too you know. You may want to write this quote down from one of the guitar gods, James Marshal (Jimi) Hendrix, "Sometimes you want to give up the guitar, you'll hate the guitar. But if you stick with it, you're gonna be rewarded."

It might be a good idea for you to remember that motivation or focus is something you can control. It has something to do with the way you think. There are lots of ways on how to get motivated. Here are some steps that I would recommend, I maybe wrong, as human as I am, but maybe you should consider experimenting them, and see what works for you and what doesn't.

Step1: Know why you are practicing. What is the greater reason why you are doing that. Think about it, and brainstorm all your answers. You have to be clear why you are doing what you are doing, does that make sense to you?

Step2: After you have a clear sense on the reasons why you must practice, I suggest that you write them down in a paper. Then, put them somewhere where you will always see them as you practice. This will remind you why you must put more focus in practicing and try to avoid distractions.

Step 3: Organize your practice routine BEFORE you practice. There are several guitarists out there who does not know the difference between practicing and playing. Know the difference.

Step4: Try to focus on ALL areas of the skills needed when practicing. Do you practice scales "only" for 3 hours? I think it's a good idea to be balanced.

Here are my ways when it comes to practicing, just wanted to share it as it maybe helpful for you:

Step1: Know how many hours I can commit for today for my musical practices.

Step2: What must I prioritize for today? What are the weaknesses that I must first conquer?

Step3: I write all of my answers from step 2 on paper.

Step4: I divide my time in doing my practices. So If I can commit 2 hours only for today, and I realized that my weakness are timing, improvisation, and songwriting, I will divide 120 minutes by 3. When you divide them, how much will we get? 40 minutes. So, I practice for 40 minutes per weakness. And also, it's good to keep in mind to take breaks after each practice. So, the outline would like this:

40 minutes practice, break for 10 minutes, 40 minutes practice, break, etc.

Step5: As I practice, I consistently remind myself that If I do not follow through this to the letter, or if I don't focus, I will never be able to achieve that goal that I seek.

Step6: Record your progress in any format. After practicing, you may want to record yourself improvising as you combine all of the skills that you have been practicing lately. Or you may want to write down your speed limit. Or you may want to write down how much you were able to hear the right notes when practicing intervals.

Be creative, and try to experiment. It's good to remember that life is never a race. It is wise, in my opinion, never to measure one's self with another since, after all, we are all unique individuals and have different goals and dreams to pursue. Focus on YOUR dream. Write them down on paper. Imagine that you already have achieved that dream. Feel it within you.

And remember, that all of the greatest composers, musicians, and artists had that same feeling that you have, right now. But you know, I think, the reason that there are only a few numbers of great artists who have now turned into immortal names is because of this common thing that they possess.

I think what they all had was this: Consistency.

They, like any artist, were against all odds. But they never surrendered. Failure is never an option. Failure is just an unwanted result. If something doesn't work, the artist who is hungry for obtaining his dreams, will find another way, a much different path. When one gives up, he then chose to fail, and never remained true to his dreams and himself. It is hard, extremely hard, but those who persist will be granted something bigger than the universe. You might want to read thoroughly what I have shared with you. So, you, my friend, are on the right path. It is also a good idea to find a teacher who will guide you along the way.

Hope this made you motivated.

Remain true to yourself, and your dreams!

Carpe diem,
Jose Daniel
Positive and negative emotions cannot occupy the mind at the same time. One or the other must dominate. It is your responsibility to make sure that positive emotions constitute the dominating influence of your mind. - Napoleon Hill