#1
E F Ab A B C D

sorry my sharp key doesn't work but those are the notes, its basically a minor scale with flat second and sharp third, really exotic sounding.

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#4
i said my sharp key doesnt work and what is a dominant scale?

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#5
It is a mode, in this case the phrygian. That means it's meant to be played over a chord/harmony of G#/Ab.
#6
i thought phyrigian is E F G A B C D E?

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#7
phyrigian dominant, not just the mode of the major scale (phrygian), this si a mode of the harmonic minor scale
Gibson SG Standard
Ibanez S2170FB
Peavey JSX
Marshall 1960A
TEXAS A&M
#8
that could be why it sounds so exotic then thanks guys!

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#9
Quote by metallicafan616
E F Ab A B C D

sorry my sharp key doesn't work but those are the notes, its basically a minor scale with flat second and sharp third, really exotic sounding.
What chord is being played under it?
#10
Yeah, the Phrygian dominant (1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7) scale is a mode of the Harmonic Minor (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7) scale. The reason it's called the Phrygian Dominant is pretty simple. You've got your dominant seventh chord, right? And in that, you've got the root, major third, fifth and minor seventh. The major third, fifth and minor seventh form a tritone, which gives you your dominant chord. So in the Phrygian Dominant scale you've got your root, major third, fifth and minor seventh. So it's the Phrygian scale but with a major third instead of a minor, and becase the first two intervals are a flat second and then a minor third it gives a really interesting sound. Michael Romeo from Symphony X uses the Phrygian Dominant scale a lot.
sig goes here
#11
Harmonic minor. Calling it phrygian dominant is stupid without context.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
Harmonic minor. Calling it phrygian dominant is stupid without context.

Not really. It all depends on your root note. If everything he plays is based around E, I would call it E Phrygian Dominant.
sig goes here
#13
Quote by Skater901
Not really. It all depends on your root note. If everything he plays is based around E, I would call it E Phrygian Dominant.


We don't know that the root note is E. You can start on whatever note you want; without context saying otherwise, those notes are harmonic minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
^ Yeah but the first note he wrote was E, so it makes sense to me that his root is E. Unless I'm mistaken, the usual way to write a scale is to write the root note first.
sig goes here
#15
Quote by Skater901
^ Yeah but the first note he wrote was E, so it makes sense to me that his root is E. Unless I'm mistaken, the usual way to write a scale is to write the root note first.


Plenty of people think that just because they start on a note, that it must be the root note. There are any number of reasons he could have written it the way he did.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#16
Forgive me if i'm wrong, but since we don't know the context how can the notes be declared harmonic minor and not Phrygian Dominant? Sorry, I'm not exactly a theory buff, so i don't know all these superficial details .
Quote by SlinkyBlue
I remember when I was really young, I had a wet dream in which i was being dragged along an urban countryside by a pickup truck.

Don't ask me I have no idea how the hell it happened.




To Me:

Quote by Son.Of.TheViper

I love you
#17
Quote by Psychedelico
Forgive me if i'm wrong, but since we don't know the context how can the notes be declared harmonic minor? Sorry, I'm not exactly a theory buff, so i don't know all these superficial details .


Without harmonic context, those notes will almost unfailingly establish themselves as harmonic minor (unless you phrase the passage in some way as to imply the backing chords for another tonal center). Calling it modal without some reason to believe that it is modal is ridiculous, since the vast majority of music isn't.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#18
The original post is the context that we're seeing it in. First of all he wrote it with E at the beginning. Obviously it doesn't matter what order you play it in but people tend to write scales starting with the root. Anything else is illogical. Secondly he described it as "a minor scale with flat second and sharp third." Ok, so maybe that isn't the best way of looking at it but it describes Phrygian Dominant a lot better than it does Harmonic Minor.
#19
Quote by sacamano79
phyrigian dominant, not just the mode of the major scale (phrygian), this si a mode of the harmonic minor scale

The truth he speaks.