#1
Arrpegios great for sweep picking.
Im looking for mainly aeolian, phrygian, diminished, and natural minor / harmonic minor riffs.
I just need a few more for practice.
Thanks and in advance let me clear up, im not asking HOW to sweep pick, just for a few arrpegios to practice with.
5 stringed preffered but not neccesary.

---DM
#3
Quote by EddieCraig
hate to break it to you but aeolian and minor are the same thing


No, they aren't.

To the threadstarter: In all honestly, chord construction is something you should have learned long before exploring harmonic minor and modes. Read the theory sticky and learn how to construct them yourself.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by Archeo Avis
No, they aren't.

aeolian = fancy modal name for minor scale
please know what your talking about
#5
Quote by EddieCraig
aeolian = fancy modal name for minor scale
please know what your talking about
Oh no you didn't!

TS, are you looking for arpeggios or riffs? For stuff to work up your sweeping chops, there's you standard two-octave 5-string major and minor arps, maybe try augmented and diminished for a little bit too. Also do a lot of work on the finger-rolling stuff, I never really got around to it and because of it I can't do as much with sweeping as I'd like to.
#6
Quote by EddieCraig
aeolian = fancy modal name for minor scale
please know what your talking about


"Aeolian" implies modal music. Using the terms interchangeably is wrong.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
"Aeolian" implies modal music. Using the terms interchangeably is wrong.

but are they not the exact same notes with the exact same roots?
touche'
#8
Quote by grampastumpy
Oh no you didn't!

TS, are you looking for arpeggios or riffs? For stuff to work up your sweeping chops, there's you standard two-octave 5-string major and minor arps, maybe try augmented and diminished for a little bit too. Also do a lot of work on the finger-rolling stuff, I never really got around to it and because of it I can't do as much with sweeping as I'd like to.

I have practiced finger rolling a lot actually.

And avis i do know chord construction im just taking recomendations for ones right now.
Im in a bit of a creative rut and i want to get out of it with some new arpegios.

And also Aeolian is a mode of the minor/major scale and is one of seven.
Learn your theory craig.
#9
Quote by EddieCraig
but are they not the exact same notes with the exact same roots?
touche'


And completely different uses.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by EddieCraig
but are they not the exact same notes with the exact same roots?
touche'


Aeolian = mode
Minor = scale
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
And completely different uses.

sorry, but both are used to achieve the same musical sound.
calling it aeolian doesnt make it exotic and different
#12
Quote by Deffmetal666
Aeolian = mode
Minor = scale
Well they're both scales. In that comparison it would be more accurate to say aeolian is mode and minor implies a key.

Have you tried any extended arpeggios? 7ths, 9ths, and beyond?
#13
Quote by EddieCraig
sorry, but both are used to achieve the same musical sound.
calling it aeolian doesnt make it exotic and different


Calling it aeolian makes it modal, which the vast majority of music isn't.
Modal music and modern tonal music do not sound even remotely similar.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Quote by Archeo Avis
Calling it aeolian makes it modal, which the vast majority of music isn't.
Modal music and modern tonal music do not sound even remotely similar.

+1

Much music nowadays is almost completely chromatic in general
#15
Quote by Archeo Avis
Calling it aeolian makes it modal, which the vast majority of music isn't.
Modal music and modern tonal music do not sound even remotely similar.

though technically aeolian and minor scale are the same thing.
and no, theres no way to make a minor scale sound not minor, so your pretty much wrong.
you can play it however you want, but bottom line is, a minor scale (or aeolian, if you will) will sound like what it is. a minor scale.

calling it a mode doesnt make it sound different.
#16
Haha, here we go.
Quote by Deffmetal666
+1

Much music nowadays is almost completely chromatic in general

No. It is not "chromatic in general".
#17
Quote by EddieCraig
though technically aeolian and minor scale are the same thing.
and no, theres no way to make a minor scale sound not minor, so your pretty much wrong.

calling it a mode doesnt make it sound different.
Just about anything in the aeolian mode can be considered minor, but it doesn't work the other way. Any non-scale tone already disqualifies it as modal, as does any deviation from the tonal center. So technically, no, theyre not.
Quote by :-D
Haha, here we go.
Ha, tell me about it. I'm currently out of the country and, being back on MT, feel so much like I'm home.
#18
and no, theres no way to make a minor scale sound not minor, so your pretty much wrong.
you can play it however you want, but bottom line is, a minor scale (or aeolian, if you will) will sound like what it is. a minor scale.


That is completely irrelevant. What the hell is your point?

The only issue here is that using the terms "aeolian" and "minor" interchangeably is incorrect. They imply completely different systems of music, regardless of their similarities. You need to shut up and stop posting.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Quote by :-D
Haha, here we go.

No. It is not "chromatic in general".

Haha i enjoy these sometimes.


Not to fuel the fire but can someone please show me what a E# minor looks like?
#20
Quote by Deffmetal666
Haha i enjoy these sometimes.


Not to fuel the fire but can someone please show me what a E# minor looks like?

An E# minor what? Chord? Scale?
#21
Quote by Deffmetal666
Haha i enjoy these sometimes.


Not to fuel the fire but can someone please show me what a E# minor looks like?
Arpeggio? It's enharmonic to an F minor.
#22
Quote by :-D
An E# minor what? Chord? Scale?

Scale, sorry the main discusion was scales so i thought that was implied.
#23
Quote by Archeo Avis
That is completely irrelevant. What the hell is your point?

The only issue here is that using the terms "aeolian" and "minor" interchangeably is incorrect. They imply completely different systems of music, regardless of their similarities. You need to shut up and stop posting.

im in no way being irrelevant
yes, you are right that they are different systems
but they still sound exactly the same
and if you get that mad over a simple disagreement, you need professional help.

according to major

1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
heres minor
Last edited by EddieCraig at Jun 11, 2008,
#24
Quote by EddieCraig
im in no way being irrelevant
yes, you are right that they are different systems
but they still sound exactly the same
and if you get that mad over a simple disagreement, you need professional help.


Modal music sounds vastly different than tonal music.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#25
Quote by EddieCraig
im in no way being irrelevant
yes, you are right that they are different systems
but they still sound exactly the same
and if you get that mad over a simple disagreement, you need professional help.

But they won't sound exactly the same.

There are progressions that are minor but not Aeolian; naturally these will sound different than strictly Aeolian vamps. In addition, the use of non-scale tones can occur in minor but not strictly Aeolian settings. He's getting mad because you have no idea what you're talking about and you're refusing to see the point here. You simply need theory help, that's all.
Quote by Deffmetal666
Scale, sorry the main discusion was scales so i thought that was implied.

Well, the minor scale is WHWWHWW, so E# minor would look like this:

E# Fx G# A# B# C# D#

The "x" means that it's a double sharp. It is, however, simply enharmonic to F minor.
Last edited by :-D at Jun 11, 2008,
#26
Quote by EddieCraig
im in no way being irrelevant
yes, you are right that they are different systems
but they still sound exactly the same
and if you get that mad over a simple disagreement, you need professional help.

according to major

1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
heres minor
Maybe he does deserve the most impatient user award(he did get it, right?), but he is right. From the first page:
Quote by grampastumpy
Just about anything in the aeolian mode can be considered minor, but it doesn't work the other way. Any non-scale tone already disqualifies it as modal, as does any deviation from the tonal center.
I try to avoid being a condescending dick as much as possible, but you, like a lot of other people, need to REALLY understand the concept of modes before correcting people about them.
#27
Quote by :-D
But they won't sound exactly the same.

There are progressions that are minor but not Aeolian; naturally these will sound different than strictly Aeolian vamps. In addition, the use of non-scale tones can occur in minor but not strictly Aeolian settings. He's getting mad because you have no idea what you're talking about and you're refusing to see the point here. You simply need theory help, that's all.

Well, the minor scale is WHWWHWW, so E# minor would look like this:

E# Fx G# A# B# C# D#

The "x" means that it's a double sharp. It is, however, simply enharmonic to F minor.


So if i was to play it in E standard tuning the E# is eharmonic to F much like for example A# to Bb?
Where in relation to the root would the Fx lie?
#28
Quote by Deffmetal666
So if i was to play it in E standard tuning the E# is eharmonic to F much like for example A# to Bb?
Where in relation to the root would the Fx lie?

Yes. They will sound the same, but have different names according to what you're using. It'd be the same regardless of your tuning, the notes don't actually change; only the place you play them on the neck does.

The distance from an E# to Fx is a major second; if you think about it enharmonically, you're going from the same pitches as an F to a G.
#29
Quote by :-D
Yes. They will sound the same, but have different names according to what you're using. It'd be the same regardless of your tuning, the notes don't actually change; only the place you play them on the neck does.

The distance from an E# to Fx is a major second; if you think about it enharmonically, you're going from the same pitches as an F to a G.

Thanks a lot.
Many people mention E# and B# exist they just never explain why.
You arent like that. Have a beer on me
#30
Quote by Deffmetal666
Thanks a lot.
Many people mention E# and B# exist they just never explain why.
You arent like that. Have a beer on me

Thanks, it's been a while since I've had an e-beer. Any other questions just feel free to ask.
#31
Quote by :-D
Thanks, it's been a while since I've had an e-beer. Any other questions just feel free to ask.

Hmm I dont have anything to ask but if anything comes up ill be countin on the smile to help me out.