#1
So on saturday my band will be recorded by a pro in a small studio
we will record 3 to 5 songs (depends how fast we are)
is there some way to prepare besides of playing the songs again and again????
#2
Get all ur amp settings written down and try to decide what mic's etc u want to use. Prob wont matter how fast u are because tech guys go at their own pace and its usually pretty slow
#3
It's pretty obvious, but have all your songs completed before you enter the studio.

Don't depend on the studio to have stuff like spare strings, cables, 9v batteries and drum tuning keys too.
Last edited by Ki' at Jun 12, 2008,
#5
dont screw up, and you'll get it done faster. my band recorded one song today (for free!) and the one problem we had that we could always pick out who went out of time and when, which is harder to hear when your all just playing and not listen as much as you do when playing it back. we would have had an awesome (if i do say so myself) song if everyone had stayed in time.
Who decided that pie would be sold on Tuesday but not Wednesday?
#6
Also remember to just relax while recording. It seems obvious but when it's in the back of your mind that you need to be playing perfect and that you are being recorded, you might screw up, even parts you normally don't. It's a different kind of nervous than playing a gig. So try to just think of it as a regular practice. It took me forever to get my drums right when we recorded.
#7
Record yourself with a ghetto blaster or something a couple of times before hand just to hear where you are at and what you need to work on.

I disagree with writing down amp settings. The engineer will probably ask you to change them anyways. For example, you'll record with less distortion than you will use when you play live. Less is often more.

A few more things:
http://www.greenroomrecording.ca - "Preparing to record."

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.