#1
why can't classical guitars have cutaways? i realize that your not supposed to have them, but i dont understand why not? is it simply because it is not traditional?
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#2
well they do sell classical guitars that do have cutaways i have one... the reason many do not is the fact that the cutaway tends to take away some of the bass and give the guitar a light bottom end instead of a full tone sound. After playing a nylon string with a cut away and a traditional one i would say the traditional style has better tone and a better bottom end... the reason they have ones with cutaways is if you play jazz etc.. and need to reach the higher frets often

hope it helped.....
#3
It sounds better and it's fairly unnecessary seeing that if you have correct technique you can access the upper frets easily.
#4
thank you both, you answered my question completely
Ibanez S520ex
Epiphone G-400
Roland Microcube
Alvarez MC90
#5
Actually because of the brace in the upper bout as well as the fingerboard being glued to the top of the guitar not much if any of the top vibrates in that section. That is why some luthiers are designing raised fingerboards where the fingerboard is glued only to the neck and the fingerboard is slightly raised from the top of the guitar.
#6
Sometimes its better having more frets on a classical guitar. There's a version of fur elise thats played on the higher frets, and i don't really want to switch to electric so, there's convenience i guess. And it looks a bit out-of-the-ordinary while its still a nylon string classical guitar.
#7
Quote by iceman817
well they do sell classical guitars that do have cutaways i have one... the reason many do not is the fact that the cutaway tends to take away some of the bass and give the guitar a light bottom end instead of a full tone sound. After playing a nylon string with a cut away and a traditional one i would say the traditional style has better tone and a better bottom end... the reason they have ones with cutaways is if you play jazz etc.. and need to reach the higher frets often

hope it helped.....


That's false. It does take away from bass/volume but it is so miniscule that the average ear WILL NOT be able to distinguish the difference. Mostly, if you are playing classical guitar you're technique will allow you to reach the upper registers without a cutaway.
#8
Actually, you can notice the difference. I know I can hear the difference in sound between two exactly identical models, one with a cutaway and one without.
#9
no, the difference is distinguishable. maybe it's because i have an above average ear though.
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#10
I'd say it's pretty much a placebo effect, like I've said. The average (as guitar players we generally have much more refined ears) human ear will not be able to distinguish the difference if you were to A?B the same model one w/ CW and the other without, if you don't tell them difference beforehand.

There is a difference, don't get me wrong, somewhere around 10%-15% or so I've heard; but in reality it is very negligible.
#11
Most luthiers will agree with me about this that a cutaway will not cause a difference in tone/volume. Ask greg gwaltney an accomplished luthier who is doing work on prototypes without the brace in the upper bout. He uses a raised fretboard which allows the entire top to vibrate but with the brace it mutes that part of the top not allowing it to vibrate. Cutaways are always after the brace so it shouldn't effect tone or volume at all or if it does then it is so miniscule that you wouldn't be able to tell the difference.