#1
so im doing my first re-finish on my guitar and i want to be 100% sure about this. i need to find out what laquer i should use on my guitar (brands, types, etc) that is available in the u.k, preferably not nitrocellulose as i am a newbie when it comes to this stuff and ontop of this i have heard that they can leave a softer finish and i want my guitar to be fairly hardwearing.

also does anyone know how often to apply the lacquer, how long to leave it to dry etc.

also i have looked at the tutorials in the sticky but they focus more on the painting and quickly brush over the lacquering at the end and searc bar didnt turn up anything in the u.k specifically
#2
Actually nitro is what is used most. Laquer paint is alot of work and takes a while to dry to be able to use the guitar again. As its put on pretty thick on a guitar it can take several weeks to cure. Dont know what the environmental laws are in the UK. There are much more user friendly ways to paint a guitar.
#3
Also, Nitro is available in spraycans, which makes application really convenient.

An alternative is Acrylic lacquer, also in spraycans. The most common ones are those sold in auto shops, Duplicolor in the US. I believe most UK folks have something similar available at Halford's (Halfords?). Most bigbox DIY stores also carry their own house brand Acrylic lacquer. Make sure you're using the same type (Acrylic) for the Sealer/Primer, Colorcoat, and Clearcoat.

With the latest chemistry and spray nozzle designs, it's difficult to completely mess up the finishing steps. Patience, opposable thumbs, and capability to follow simple directions are the only requirements. Good Luck!

#4
Quote by Ippon
Also, Nitro is available in spraycans, which makes application really convenient.

An alternative is Acrylic lacquer, also in spraycans. The most common ones are those sold in auto shops, Duplicolor in the US. I believe most UK folks have something similar available at Halford's (Halfords?). Most bigbox DIY stores also carry their own house brand Acrylic lacquer. Make sure you're using the same type (Acrylic) for the Sealer/Primer, Colorcoat, and Clearcoat.

With the latest chemistry and spray nozzle designs, it's difficult to completely mess up the finishing steps. Patience, opposable thumbs, and capability to follow simple directions are the only requirements. Good Luck!



Yep!

Halfords, B&Q, Homebase, and Wickes sell all-purpose spraypaints. The Halfords stuff is pretty good, because it's designed for cars, and gives a thin finish that's also pretty durable. They also sell a decent clear coat in cans, which most home-improvement/DIY stores don't usually. We don't have any big chains of auto shops over here, so Halfords is THE place to get stuff.

Edit: Something like this http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_10001_catalogId_10151_productId_206575_langId_-1_CarSelectorCatalogId__CarSelectorGroupId__varient__categoryId_90898_crumb_33958-90885-90886_parentcategoryrn_90898
Last edited by -MintSauce- at Jun 13, 2008,
#5
o.k thanks ippon and mintsauce seems a lot easier then i expected

do you have any more info on how many coats to do, how long to wait in between each one? or how long untill its completely dry an im able to use my guitar again

btw im attempting a swirl paintjob which ive heard are hard but i think ive got it craked, in any case i have a backup plan with what i want to do if it goes wrong. i will post pics when it is completed
#6
Quote by schnips63
o.k thanks ippon and mintsauce seems a lot easier then i expected

do you have any more info on how many coats to do, how long to wait in between each one? or how long untill its completely dry an im able to use my guitar again

btw im attempting a swirl paintjob which ive heard are hard but i think ive got it craked, in any case i have a backup plan with what i want to do if it goes wrong. i will post pics when it is completed


It depends on the specific paint. All of the information on how to apply it is on the can/tin. You might want anywhere between 5 and 15 thin coats, depending on how much sanding and buffing you do between.

From a can that I have in my bedroom:

"Apply 2 coats of lacquer. Between coats allow 15 minutes for the lacquer to become tough dry".

And..

"Always allow new lacquer to dry and harden for at least 2 weeks before using a rubbing compound".
#7
Quote by -MintSauce-
It depends on the specific paint. All of the information on how to apply it is on the can/tin. You might want anywhere between 5 and 15 thin coats, depending on how much sanding and buffing you do between.

From a can that I have in my bedroom:

"Apply 2 coats of lacquer. Between coats allow 15 minutes for the lacquer to become tough dry".

And..

"Always allow new lacquer to dry and harden for at least 2 weeks before using a rubbing compound".


does this mean i have to wait 2 weeks before i do any fine sanding.... because i was under the impression that you were supposed to do very light sanding inbetween each coat of lacquer?????
#8
Google "manchester guitar tech",he has an array of laquers(mostly,if not all of which are nitro) it's true that nitro is softer/less hard wearing;companies like Fender,Jackson,Ibanez etc use polyurethane on the lower end models.
Gibson and the custom shops of other companies use nitro-cellulose