#1
i stumbled upon this in a local guitarshop and was wondering if anyone knew anything about it?



its £100 (around $195 US)

theres a few dings and could use a pickup change, what do you guys think?
Quote by silentdob
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Last edited by BlackBeautyBoy at Jun 14, 2008,
#2
if the actions okay and it works, whats there to loose?
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#4
actions as high as kite.

anybody know the circa year?
Quote by silentdob
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#6
I love old 80's Super-Strats, so excuse me if I ramble on a bit...


It's almost certainly an Epiphone S-600, if not better.

The S-series were started to compete with Kramer Super-Strats, who had become very popular in the 80's thanks to their heavy use by bands Van Halen and Bon Jovi. The Epi S-series consisted of the S-210, S-310, S-400, S-600, S-800 and S-900. The T-series (Telecaster copies) were also made at the same time, but didn't last as long. The S-series survived (in one form or another) from 1986 to 1999 (while the T-series only lasted between 1986 and 1992)

The model of that specific guitar is most likely the S-600; the cheapest of the S-series to have 'sharktooth' inlays, a tremolo bridge, and a bridge humbucker.
If it is an S-600, the spec should be:
25.5" scale.
Solid basswood body.
Bolt-on maple neck.
Rosewood fretboard with 21 medium-size steel frets.
White plastic sharktooth inlays.
Black hardware.
Steinberger traditional tremolo bridge.
The standard generic Epiphone pickups, tuners, pots and input that were used at the time.
'Extra gloss' thick poly finish (though considering it's age, I doubt it's still very glossy).
The S-600 was available in the finishes: White, Alpine White, Black, Black Metallic, Blue, Light Blue Metallic, Red, Red Metallic, Green, Green Metallic, and the S-600, S-800 and S-900 also had a Limited Edition Candy Pink Metallic finish in 1987.

The S-600, S-800 and S-900 were made between 1986 and 1989 (the others were made from 1986 up to 1999). So that guitar is at least 19 years old, could be 22 years old. They were all made in Korea.

All reports say that the S-600, S-800 and S-900 were great guitars, with the S-900 being able to easily compete with the standard Kramer Super-Strats that were so loved in the 80's, and the S-600 and S-800 weren't too far behind. From what I can tell, the S-600 was about the same sort of quality overall as a modern Epiphone G-400 SG or Les Paul Standard.

I don't think it's an S-800 or S-900, because those had extra switches, a coil tap for the bridge humbucker (though the S-600 might also have that, I'm not 100% sure), the S-900 had an all-maple neck-through construction, all the usual stock Epiphone parts were upgraded to other brands, of course they cost more, and I can't believe that one would still be laying around in a shop for a mere £100.


In 1986, when they were first launched, the S-600 retailed at £160 for solid finishes, £175 for Metallic finishes (the 1987 Limited Edition Candy Pink Metallic finish retailed at £210 for the S-600 version). Modern prices on a mint condition solid finish S-600 should be around the £240 mark.
The S-400 retailed at £120 in 1986, and a mint 1988 one would now be valued at £190, which makes me think that either that guitar you've found is either in really bad shape to be so cheap, or the store thinks it's an S-310 or lower (which it certainly isn't, since the S-400 and below had dot inlays and single coils in the bridge, and the S-210 and S-310 didn't have tremolo bridges).


So, to sum up, you're looking at a 1986, 1987, 1988 or 1989, Korean-made S-600 Kramer Super-Strat copy (remember, this was before Gibson owned Kramer alongside Epiphone), worth probably about £200, give or take a little bit more depending on the condition. Even if it's in bad condition, at £100, that's an absolute bargain. I say, buy it as soon as you can.



EDIT: and it's not surprising the action is high and the pickups need changing. Those are stock generic Epiphone pickups that have endured twenty years of use, so of course they'll be a bit knackered. As for the action, lots of 80's players liked high action for the extra clarity it provided when playing quickly, and I imagine the previous owner probably liked that too.
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Last edited by MrFlibble at Jun 14, 2008,
#7
Quote by MrFlibble
I love old 80's Super-Strats, so excuse me if I ramble on a bit...


It's almost certainly an Epiphone S-600, if not better.

The S-series were started to compete with Kramer Super-Strats, who had become very popular in the 80's thanks to their heavy use by bands Van Halen and Bon Jovi. The Epi S-series consisted of the S-210, S-310, S-400, S-600, S-800 and S-900. The T-series (Telecaster copies) were also made at the same time, but didn't last as long. The S-series survived (in one form or another) from 1986 to 1999 (while the T-series only lasted between 1986 and 1992)

The model of that specific guitar is most likely the S-600; the cheapest of the S-series to have 'sharktooth' inlays, a tremolo bridge, and a bridge humbucker.
If it is an S-600, the spec should be:
25.5" scale.
Solid basswood body.
Bolt-on maple neck.
Rosewood fretboard with 21 medium-size steel frets.
White plastic sharktooth inlays.
Black hardware.
Steinberger traditional tremolo bridge.
The standard generic Epiphone pickups, tuners, pots and input that were used at the time.
'Extra gloss' thick poly finish (though considering it's age, I doubt it's still very glossy).
The S-600 was available in the finishes: White, Alpine White, Black, Black Metallic, Blue, Light Blue Metallic, Red, Red Metallic, Green, Green Metallic, and the S-600, S-800 and S-900 also had a Limited Edition Candy Pink Metallic finish in 1987.

The S-600, S-800 and S-900 were made between 1986 and 1989 (the others were made from 1986 up to 1999). So that guitar is at least 19 years old, could be 22 years old. They were all made in Korea.

All reports say that the S-600, S-800 and S-900 were great guitars, with the S-900 being able to easily compete with the standard Kramer Super-Strats that were so loved in the 80's, and the S-600 and S-800 weren't too far behind. From what I can tell, the S-600 was about the same sort of quality overall as a modern Epiphone G-400 SG or Les Paul Standard.

I don't think it's an S-800 or S-900, because those had extra switches, a coil tap for the bridge humbucker (though the S-600 might also have that, I'm not 100% sure), the S-900 had an all-maple neck-through construction, all the usual stock Epiphone parts were upgraded to other brands, of course they cost more, and I can't believe that one would still be laying around in a shop for a mere £100.


In 1986, when they were first launched, the S-600 retailed at £160 for solid finishes, £175 for Metallic finishes (the 1987 Limited Edition Candy Pink Metallic finish retailed at £210 for the S-600 version). Modern prices on a mint condition solid finish S-600 should be around the £240 mark.
The S-400 retailed at £120 in 1986, and a mint 1988 one would now be valued at £190, which makes me think that either that guitar you've found is either in really bad shape to be so cheap, or the store thinks it's an S-310 or lower (which it certainly isn't, since the S-400 and below had dot inlays and single coils in the bridge, and the S-210 and S-310 didn't have tremolo bridges).


So, to sum up, you're looking at a 1986, 1987, 1988 or 1989, Korean-made S-600 Kramer Super-Strat copy (remember, this was before Gibson owned Kramer alongside Epiphone), worth probably about £200, give or take a little bit more depending on the condition. Even if it's in bad condition, at £100, that's an absolute bargain. I say, buy it as soon as you can.



EDIT: and it's not surprising the action is high and the pickups need changing. Those are stock generic Epiphone pickups that have endured twenty years of use, so of course they'll be a bit knackered. As for the action, lots of 80's players liked high action for the extra clarity it provided when playing quickly, and I imagine the previous owner probably liked that too.


2 hours of googling dinnt answer my questions, but you have!

going to the shop tomorrow to get it, ive asked them to reserve it for me

cheers guys!
Quote by silentdob
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#8
just got on this thread, and i would say that thats an S-310 or lower with an S-600 or higher neck, b/c the S-600 didnt come with a pickguard.
#9
TS, you should probably get a new input jack, and probably pots and a new switch too. It looks like they'll probably be rusty. That thing looks like it can be really sweet if you upgrade it.
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#10
Gotta love those Epiphones. My old guitar teacher has a TC-310 (i think) and that's the telecaster law suit copy.

That's incredibly sexy. I'd buy that.