#1
if a power chord contains for example the notes F, C, F, can only the notes F and C be played over it when coming up with solos? this whole thing confuses me, i have learned that there are different scales and they are named after the root note of the scale, but what i dont get is how that fits in with the rhythm guitar and the power chords they play
#2
Quote by Random3
if a power chord contains for example the notes F, C, F, can only the notes F and C be played over it when coming up with solos? this whole thing confuses me, i have learned that there are different scales and they are named after the root note of the scale, but what i dont get is how that fits in with the rhythm guitar and the power chords they play
Pick any scale that has a C and an F in it. F major would work best, cause the C and the F are strong notes in F major. Or C major, for the same resons.
#3
Well in theory if you're just playing over a static powerchord you could play any scale that contains those two notes; powerchords give you a LOT of freedom when soloing but you have to be careful of chord changes.
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#4
Very basic, F C & F are part of the key of F and you can throw in a major or minor third on top of that. If you are playing the F-C-F as the tonic chord and throw in an "A" then you can play any notes from F Major. It is also a very basic practice to start and end on one of the notes in the chord when playing a scale run, but as I said that is very basic because there are leaning notes that you can end on that lead to the next chord you play. There are so many other options as well using modes, relative keys, non-terrian harmony, etc. that it is good to just record yourself playing a chord progression and then just play scales, modes, etc and listen to how they work with each other.
#5
This is where theory comes in. Kindly read the "theory" link in my sig. Feel free to ask questions about what you don't get, but do ask a question; "I don't get it," posts will not get responses.
#6
the main reason power chords are used is because they sound good with distortion, unlike minor or major chords (it's got something to do with the spacing of the notes)

so, because the chord is just 1 and 5, you can make it a lot more interesting by playing 2nds, 3rds, 4ths etc and so you've got a lot of freedom

also, it generally sounds a lot better if you play the riff or solo higher than the chord, again so the notes are more spaced

one thing that i find sounds really good is if one guitar is playing a power chord and the other is playing the 3rd as an octave,

eg
gt 1
:---:
:---:
:---:
:-3-:
:-3-:
:-1-:

gt 2
:---:
:---:
:-14-:
:---:
:-12-:
:---: