#1
Okay so my band has been together since like 7th grade and we all just got done with our 9th grade year. At first, everything was fine and we were just kinda goofing off and being content with our ability to only play through one song (a green day cover, to make it worse.) we were able to write a few more, playing at our schools talent show, that being pretty much our only gig to date. We never had a vocalist, as our seventh grade balls hadn't dropped, and we still don't really. i can play rhythm guitar and sing if necessary and my other guitarist is fine and i don't have any problems with him.

however, in the bass and drums department, we arrive at what has been holding us back. our bassist is a lefty but plays a right handed bass, which isn't really that important. what's important is that he really can't play through anything without buzzing pretty much every note on top of the fact that he is lazy, stubborn, and generally an ass a lot of the time. our drummer is really cool and i like him as a person a lot but the thing is he can't write his own parts or play the ones i write for him. i don't even write parts that are that complex or anything. most of it is stock beats and even the simplest of fills he messes up and throws all of us off. he often speeds up or slows down very badly when we are just practicing alone, and i often get frustrated with him for his lack of ability to drum, although i don't show it (to him at least.)

now both of these people are two of my best friends, but i really can't see my guitarist and myself advancing as musicians in a band with them. on the other hand, kicking them out would potentially harm our friendship severely. all of us have known each other and been friends since early elementary school, which just makes getting them out of the band incredibly difficult.

so what should my guitarist and i do? we're open to pretty much anything at this point. all we really want to do is play music. any help would be appreciated, thanks.
sincerely,
daniel
#2
Hey bro,I had the same problem in my band. my bassist and drummer kinda sucked, but i didn't complain. Kickin' them out wouldn't be good, so don't do it. Your little issue should b solved by showing them how to play what you want them to play. i don't know what you can do with your bassist, but try your best. in my band, Im pretty much the leader, so my job is like yours. Im both the vocalist and guitarist. On our first gig, I actually told my bassist to shut off his amp and pretend to play, and my drummer threw me off on many songs.All im saying is, don't fire half of your band, just teach them. Okay? later
#3
Just tell them that you want to take it more seriously now. From what you said it doesn't sound like everyone may be on the same page as you. Suggest to your drummer to just practice more, or take some lessons if he's not ( yes, they do help and are totally worth the money) as for your bassist just tell him that he needs to be more of a team player. If they're your friends it should be ok being honest with them, and telling them that you think they need to step it up. I wouldn't get rid of them just yet, mostly because bassists and drummers are the hardest to find, and because maybe after talking to them they will get serious and improve. I don't think that a band feud would ruin years of friendship, so just talk to them.
#4
This is what "Side Projects" are for..... at first it's a side project.... then it's a band better than the old one.... then the old one doesn't exist anymore.

Of course, this is all assuming that you can find other people to play with.
#5
Quote by Code-jay
Hey bro,I had the same problem in my band. my bassist and drummer kinda sucked, but i didn't complain. Kickin' them out wouldn't be good, so don't do it. Your little issue should b solved by showing them how to play what you want them to play. i don't know what you can do with your bassist, but try your best. in my band, Im pretty much the leader, so my job is like yours. Im both the vocalist and guitarist. On our first gig, I actually told my bassist to shut off his amp and pretend to play, and my drummer threw me off on many songs.All im saying is, don't fire half of your band, just teach them. Okay? later


You sound like an ego maniac
#6
Quote by Philbigtime
This is what "Side Projects" are for..... at first it's a side project.... then it's a band better than the old one.... then the old one doesn't exist anymore.

Of course, this is all assuming that you can find other people to play with.

Agreed.


In the meantime, you could try hightening the playing action on your bassist's bass. It makes it slightly harder to play (meaning he'll have to put more effort into it) but it should help to cure the buzzing problem.
As for the drummer, it sounds like you trying to get him to play beyond his immediate capabilities, ask him what he feels he should be playing and give him more options, tell him to just play what comes naturaly, don't barrack him too much when he screws up but praise him a lot when he does something that sounds good, even if it's just one fill. This'll make him relax more, which is apparently quite important to drumming. (according to our drummer anyway)
Once he's getting through the songs without too much struggling, (because he'll have simplified everything) then slowly get him to start adding bits, the odd fill here and there, beat changes, ect.
He should, hopefully, improve over time.
#7
thanks for the advice guys. could i get some opinions on the other side of the argument regarding kicking them out or getting a new band? i kinda feel like starting with a fresh slate would be better and kind of refreshing in some ways. thanks.
sincerely,
daniel
#8
just need to get them to work harder, try to inspire them. I picked up my rhythm guitarist, bassist, and drummer when they practically started playing. You can't force their development, just guide them. Now my bassist is really good after about a year, and my guitarist and drummer are also good now.

Oh and another thing, if you write the stuff, just make it easier. It'll encourage them, and if they're anything like my bassist, they'll practice really hard to fancy it up.
i have a 'white guitar'
#9
If your bassist is an ass, lazy, stubborn and can't play worth s**t, fire him, but not immediately. Try to get him to practice and improve (same with the drummer), but if he doesen't want to, warn him that he'd be gone. A little after that, if it's still the same thing, fire him. That is, if you can find a replacement.
#10
Dude, I had the same problem with my bass player, that your having with your drummer and bass player, so it was kind of worse. My bass player can't contribute anything to the band (Original song ideas, riffs, lyrics). I have to write everything for him, and I learned that when I show him, he completely plays it wrong and forgets it at the next practice, so I tab everything out for him now. I had the thought of quitting the band, and knew it would harm our friendship, and I did that once for a day, and when I called him, he was all sad, and I said, "Just because we aren't in a band anymore, doesn't mean we still can't be friends." We eventually worked out the problems and continued to play. Tell them you and your other guitarist want to be more serious, and that they aren't cutting it. Break up the band if they don't getting more serious, and call them a day a later saying "Just because we aren't in a band anymore, doesn't mean we still can't be friends," if they are adult about it, you will still continue to have your friendship. I think Dave Mustaine said something about never starting a band with close friends, because if stuff gets rough, you will lose those friends.
#11
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Agreed.


In the meantime, you could try hightening the playing action on your bassist's bass. It makes it slightly harder to play (meaning he'll have to put more effort into it) but it should help to cure the buzzing problem.
As for the drummer, it sounds like you trying to get him to play beyond his immediate capabilities, ask him what he feels he should be playing and give him more options, tell him to just play what comes naturaly, don't barrack him too much when he screws up but praise him a lot when he does something that sounds good, even if it's just one fill. This'll make him relax more, which is apparently quite important to drumming. (according to our drummer anyway)
Once he's getting through the songs without too much struggling, (because he'll have simplified everything) then slowly get him to start adding bits, the odd fill here and there, beat changes, ect.
He should, hopefully, improve over time.


this is the best possible advice you can give. i had the same problem, i treated it the same way as you just described, and now we rock harder than ever.