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#1
I want to learn theory that can be applied in my bass playing but I have no idea as to how to go about learning. A teacher isn't really an option at the moment, are there any good websites out there or maybe any books I could work from that you guys could recommend?

Cheers
#3
Theory is gonna be really hard without a teacher. Ive got a teacher teaching me even the basic stuff and i find it mind-boggling.

Use Google and see these things.

Well first learn your chromatic scale (the notes, sounds) Very Important!

Then think about major and minor scales.

Apply that to your knowledge with the chromatic scale and find patterns, sounds and most importantly know the notes your playing. Use this and go all around the neck with it until you feel you know know that well enough.

If your truly going for it that should take you a while indeed.
Now, a question of etiquette - as I pass, do I give you the ass or the crotch?
#4
ive used studybass for about a year and i find it great help
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#5
if you get really deep into it its nice to have a teacher (or just a really smart kid in the class lol)

but theres some good websites ive found by just googling (it helps if you google the specific thing you want not just "theory"
#7
there are places on this website you could learn, but I never found many of the lessons here (including the ones I wrote lol) very efficient.


basically, If you want, I'll try to teach you. We really should try to make like a "common bass theory" post or something, as this question is frequently.
Before I try to begin, my question is: how much theory do you know/do you know any theory?
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#9
Quote by UtBDan
there are places on this website you could learn, but I never found many of the lessons here (including the ones I wrote lol) very efficient.


basically, If you want, I'll try to teach you. We really should try to make like a "common bass theory" post or something, as this question is frequently.
Before I try to begin, my question is: how much theory do you know/do you know any theory?


Well my first instrument was the drums and i used to have lessons in which i was taught a bit of theory such as note values and time signatures. On the bass I'm on the way to learning the fretboard, I understand the major scale somewhat and I'm able to move it around the fretboard in different positions rather then just playing it as a shape.

Thanks for offering to help
#10
ah, well, in the major scale/using the major scale, do you know how to name intervals? cause intervals are the way to learn chords, and chords are the primary basis for most theory.
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
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#11
Quote by UtBDan
ah, well, in the major scale/using the major scale, do you know how to name intervals? cause intervals are the way to learn chords, and chords are the primary basis for most theory.


I don't know how to name them, I guess that us where I should start?

Cheers
#12
Quote by UtBDan
there are places on this website you could learn, but I never found many of the lessons here (including the ones I wrote lol) very efficient.


basically, If you want, I'll try to teach you. We really should try to make like a "common bass theory" post or something, as this question is frequently.
Before I try to begin, my question is: how much theory do you know/do you know any theory?


I am very interested in this idea. : )
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#14
Scales and intervals and chord construction are key. And to Dan, I think a theory thread would be great; it does get asked quite a bit.

We've had a few TOTMs on basic theory in the past, but its been a while and probably time to start up a fresh one.

And Orlando--on jazz scales; I'm knee deep right now in learning to improvise in the Whole/Half diminished scale in jazz in the ii-V-I progression, lol. In Jazz, you can't get anywhere without scale theory at the very least.
#18
alright, the major scale, everyone probably knows the shape.
How to form it?
you take one note, then move up in the following tones:
Whole Whole Half Whole Whole Whole Half

for the inebriated, a Whole tone is 2 chromatic tones (2 frets) and a half tone is 1.

This will form the major scale as we all know it. But, what this leads me to is this...
naming intervals.


The fourth tone in the major scale (same fret, one string over) is called a "perfect 4th".
The fifth tone in the major scale (2 frets over, one string over) is called a "perfect 5th".
An octave can technically be called a "perfect octave" or "perfect 8th".


They're called perfect because the two waves of frequency match up in fairly even terms: 1 to 2 or 2 to 1 etc.
They occur at even spots is the punchline. Pretty simple concept even if my fractions are off.

Every other note in the major scale, when referred to as an interval, is called a major interval.
Hence, the 2nd note in a major scale? a Major 2nd. 3rd? Major 3rd. 6th? Major 6th. 7th? Major 7th.

This is pretty simple so far, hopefully we're all on the same page.


But where it gets tricky is this: the same thing doesn't apply to the minor scale. Obviously, the natural minor scale has a major 2nd in it, it isn't called a minor 2nd there... it's still a Major 2nd.


How you name intervals goes like this

assume each arrow (<-- or --> is a half tone up or down.



Diminished <--     Perfect     --> Augmented
Diminished <-- Minor <-- Major --> Augmented


hence, if you take a perfect fifth, and take it down one step, it is a... diminished 5th.

Hence also, this is why even though C# and Db sound the same, they are different things.
Let's say you're playing in the key of F#.
C# is a perfect 5th!
Db is a diminished 6th.
You'll never see a Db in the key of F#, cause why would you play a diminished 6th when you could play a perfect 5th?
There's more to it than this, but that requires chordal knowledge... which requires a firm understanding in intervals, which is what I'm trying to teach.


everyone with me so far / ie. should I prove some examples?
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
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#19
Good stuff Dan. How about making a Theory of the Month on this for June / July?

And I understand this (being knee deep in scale theory at present, but some examples would be probably good at this point)
#20
^ yeah I'll do this for theory of the month for July. hopefully I'll work out all the kinks in this thread. lol
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#21
Quote by UtBDan
^ yeah I'll do this for theory of the month for July. hopefully I'll work out all the kinks in this thread. lol


Cool. Its an area that I was rather thin in coming into bass myself.

I'll update the Forum thread.
#22
Looks good, this would be really beneficial for beginning players or anybody looking for a refresher.
#24
Right so, from therin, you can form chords.

The four chords said to be most common (they aren't the four most common, but virtually any teacher teaching you music theory and not guitar will act like they are) are your four basic "triads".
Triads are technically any 3 notes played together at the same time (just as a Diad is technically any 2 notes. Clever, no? No, no it isn't. You're right.)

But, in this case, the four primary triads are as follows:

Major triad: Root + Major 3rd + Perfect 5th
Minor triad: Root + minor 3rd + Perfect 5th
Diminished triad: Root + minor 3rd + diminished 5th
Augmented triad: Root + Major 3rd + Augmented 5th

A major chord you will see written as just the root.
ie A, B, C, D, E, F, G, etc.
So, if people say "play me a C chord", they're really asking you to play a C major triad, which, based on our interval knowledge, is
C (root) + E (major 3rd) + G (perfect 5th)

A minor chord will be written as the root, with a lowercase m after it.
ie Am, Bm, Cm, Dm, Em, Fm, Gm, etc.
if people say "play me a D minor chord", they're asking you to play a D minor triad.
which based on our interval knowledge and this knowledge of a triad, is D (root) F (minor 3rd) A (perfect 5th).

A diminished chord has no real symbol.
If you see a diminished chord, it will be written as "dim".
ie Cdim Ddim etc. etc. etc.
an A diminished chord, based on our knowledge of intervals and triads, will be made of A (root), C (minor 3rd), and Eb (diminished 5th.)


with me so far?
I'm trying to provide examples. I can ask questions, but even before the questions are asked I need you to know A Bb C C# D Eb F F# G Ab, which I didnt ask if you knew, so, um, oops, and, did you understand me so far, before I start to get into the real whacky cords?
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#26
Ripper, when it comes to teaching yourself theory... Google is by far your best friend.
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#27
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
^The diminished chord is that little circle is it not? Or is that just for seventh chords?


Indeed it is the litle circle. Half diminished is the circle with a slash through it.
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#29
I think I'm with you but what did you mean with the "A Bb C C# D Eb F F# G Ab"

Cheers
#31
A major third is 4 half tones and a minor third is 3 half tones. Also, it depends on the scale. If it's a C major scale CDEFGABC then the third is a major third. If it's C minor C-D-Eb-F-G-Ab-Bb-C the third is minor.
#34
Oh sry lol! Just trust me, I understand now! I just had to refresh my brain with all this theory. I know I've learned some of this before but it was awhile ago and I forgot a lot of it.
#36
Is Utbdan gonna work on a theory of the month for this month or next month?

Well, Utbdan, whenever you write one, I have two suggestions for it: Triad Inversions and Diatonic Triads. If you could write a lesson or something or those, it would definetly help me out.
#37
just learn where your notes are on the fretboard and youll be able to connect scales better. i bought the bass grimoiroe(spelling?) and i didnt even need to check out the scales. After reading the first couple of pages i truley understood theory. idk i feel like bass guitar is somewhat restricted. its a beautiful instrument but not everything sounds good on it. i prefer "in the pocket playing", and occasional solos and riffs. stuff like muse, radiohead, beatles =)
#38
Quote by Funkbass796
Indeed it is the litle circle. Half diminished is the circle with a slash through it.


yes it is, but unless you're using a 7th chord, very few people will write the symbol.
and if they do, its on a jazz sheet. I don't know what type of musical perspective I'm doing this from. lol

Quote by ccmetz2020
Is Utbdan gonna work on a theory of the month for this month or next month?

Well, Utbdan, whenever you write one, I have two suggestions for it: Triad Inversions and Diatonic Triads. If you could write a lesson or something or those, it would definetly help me out.



whenever I feel like I'm done, I'll post it for July.

triad inversions is really more classical than anything, and I could definately explain it - it's certainly not hard - but it'd be useless in the context of 98% of the people in this forum. If you just want someone to explain it to you, IM me on AIM; but most people here would do better knowing how to make a C/E chord than they would a C 64 chord. (64 being the term for 2nd inversion! wakka wakka! over your head? OK I'll stop.)

diatonic triads I always feel should be taught after you learn your 7th chords... and should just learn diatonic 7th chords.


I'll do diatonic triads etc. later tonight. I have to make a grocery store run now.
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#39
So, is there even a need to know about triad inversions if I'm not doing anything classical?
#40
^ an understanding of the classical aspect of it will come in handy if you wish to use counterpoint in your playing, or want to go into more complex views of melody & harmony.

but if you just want to be able to look at chords and rock out, it's nearly completely unnecessary to know inversions in the classical sense of it.
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
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