#1
people say speed is a by product of accuracy, does that mean you can play fast only on the licks you practice? If so, how'd the hell would one know which patterns/notes will sound good when played fast?
#3
^ yes, or become so familiar with the notes on the fretboard that you know what it will sound like in advance

its like going on a mental autopilot
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#5
Quote by fffplol
people say speed is a by product of accuracy, does that mean you can play fast only on the licks you practice? If so, how'd the hell would one know which patterns/notes will sound good when played fast?

If you want to play a certain piece quickly then you need to perfect it at a slower speed first, that's why speed is a byproduct of accuracy. The better you know a piece and the better you are at the actions required to perform it then the faster you'll be able to play it.

Improvising at speed isn't an easy thing at all, you need a high degree of technical ability, a decent amount of theory knowledge and also the ability to think fast.

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#6
Basically, if you play the scales that you're gonna be improvising with VERY SLOWLY (and therefore accurately) and you play them over and over and over and........ then your fingers get to where they can play the scale without you having to think about it, and thus you'll be able to play it faster. Of course you have to play it fast at some point, not just slowly, but if you start out slowly, you'll be able to play it faster overall.
#7
thanks for your replies so far

Soo basically, learn theory to know what the hell's going on, then improvise slowly, then get to speed?

What's the point of "1-2-3-4" types of excercise then? that help in your overall speed development? I'm not obsessed about speed or anything, just wondering lol.

Are all the fast runs done by the pros conjured up from scales? heck, is music made up of scales?!
Last edited by fffplol at Jun 16, 2008,
#8
There's little to be gained from shredding scales up and down - use scales to construct exercises and create licks by all means, but don't obsess about playing straight scale patterns up and down at speed.

Improvising is about making music, straight scale patterns are just boring. As far as the 1234 exercise goes that helps you develop finger independence and dexterity, particularly if you mix up the order. It's also a good warm up, but again it's not really going to help all-round speed that much - if you practice anything long enough you'll get fast at that thing, you have to ask yourself what practical benefit you're going to get from it.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jun 16, 2008,