#2
yes, but it won't sound very good, and you will need to use fairly heavy electric strings to keep proper tension on the neck.
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#3
well technically yes, but I don't see the point. Acoustic strings should be a bit thicker, if you don't like the texture of yours try Elixir's, they have a different texture and last pretty long. Acoustic strings will sound a lot better than electric strings.
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#5
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
yes, but it won't sound very good, and you will need to use fairly heavy electric strings to keep proper tension on the neck.


no not really it sounds better than most acoustic strings I have used and I have regular slinkys on my acoustics and it sounds great
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#6
Quote by punkmetalA7X91
no not really it sounds better than most acoustic strings I have used and I have regular slinkys on my acoustics and it sounds great


I noticed you said most acoustic strings. If some acoustic strings sound better then just get those acoustic strings.

...They make electric and acoustic strings different for a reason. Try other acoustic strings might help some. What exactly do you dislike about acoustic strings?

But to answer the question, yes and no. Although you can and it wont mess anything up unless you use a extremely light gage like 8s or something. You could probably use 9s without having to have an adjustment but it all depends on how your acoustic is set up.

To be honest, I think you should get some new acoustic strings.
#7
They make both electric strings and acoustic strings for a reason.
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#8
I just dont like them being so heavy. I have d'addario lights on it now.
#9
Quote by punkmetalA7X91
no not really it sounds better than most acoustic strings I have used and I have regular slinkys on my acoustics and it sounds great


well I guess if you like a small, tinny sound, then more power to you.
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#10
Quote by djgbsbj
I just dont like them being so heavy. I have d'addario lights on it now.


Sorry if this sounds harsh, but suck it up. Electric strings sound like crap on an acoustic. Once you get used to playing an acoustic, it'll make you a better electric guitar player.
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#11
Quote by captivate
Sorry if this sounds harsh, but suck it up. Electric strings sound like crap on an acoustic. Once you get used to playing an acoustic, it'll make you a better electric guitar player.

I don't really agree with this.

I think that it is easier to transition from acoustic to electric, than it is the other way around. But I don't think that playing acoustic makes you a better electric player. Obviously, practice makes you better guitar player overall, but acoustic and electric are really two different animals.
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#12
Quote by slidething31
I don't really agree with this.

I think that it is easier to transition from acoustic to electric, than it is the other way around. But I don't think that playing acoustic makes you a better electric player. Obviously, practice makes you better guitar player overall, but acoustic and electric are really two different animals.


I think it makes you a better electric guitarist because it finally builds your finger strength to a point where you will no longer need any more strengthening(for electric anyway). Thousands of guitarists who know nothing more than the electric guitar barely have enough finger strength to even play a barre chord for 15 minutes without their hand cramping. My point was mainly about the finger strength. I know about... 3 electric guitarists who cant play an acoustic well because their hands are too weak.

I think the strengthening of the hands is important because you'll be able to use the right amount force without having to consciously think about it much, if at all. Stronger fingers also make playing faster riffs easier as well. At least that's how I feel after I switch from my acoustic to my electric. Although, to be honest, I'm not exactly a great guitarist to begin with.
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#13
I agree that it certainly builds finger strength. But, with electric guitars, generally, you don't need as much finger strength.

Sometimes when I haven't played electric in a while, I find that I fret some notes a bit sharp because I'm used to playing acoustic.

Really, any playing time, on acoustic or electric, will help you improve as a guitarist. But the two are very different when it somes to actual play and feel.
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#14
Yeah. I can definitely appreciate how different the playing styles are. Even playing lead on an acoustic as opposed to an electric is completely different. Anyway, my main beef is with the weakling electric guitarists who don't have enough finger strength to even play electric They need to man it up a bit. I feel that it's better to have a bit too much finger strength as opposed to too little. You can reserve(and therefore relax your arms as well, which is also a good thing) a bit of strength more easily than when you dont have enough strength to begin with.
Equipment:
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#15
Eh I started playing guitar using .13, it was hell; bar chords took me months to learn. But it really pays off when you play an electric, it feels like butter.
#16
It is 'ok' in the sense that you wont hurt your guitar (a set up may be required though). It may even sound 'alright' but i doubt youll find many people who actually prefer the sound.
If the thickness of the strings is the only problem then 10-47's are probably the lightest gauge youll find. I personally dont recommend getting anything lighter than 11's but i suppose you could start at 10's and work up.
#17
Quote by slidething31
I agree that it certainly builds finger strength. But, with electric guitars, generally, you don't need as much finger strength.

Sometimes when I haven't played electric in a while, I find that I fret some notes a bit sharp because I'm used to playing acoustic.

Really, any playing time, on acoustic or electric, will help you improve as a guitarist. But the two are very different when it somes to actual play and feel.

just out of curiosity, I've played acoustic but never really electric, when you do stuff like hammers on the strings how responssive are the strings in terms of sound output compared to on an acoustic?

I know it varies from stuff like the actual guitars, but from a strict acoustic vs electric pov
#18
Quote by CliffIsAngry
just out of curiosity, I've played acoustic but never really electric, when you do stuff like hammers on the strings how responssive are the strings in terms of sound output compared to on an acoustic?

I know it varies from stuff like the actual guitars, but from a strict acoustic vs electric pov

Electric is way more responsive. On the acoustic you have to hammer much harder, unless you are plugged in.
#19
Well iplayed acoustic for 6-7 months b4 i even had a electric. I used to play it with 12s but now the 10s are kind of hard. Its not my fretting hand that has trouble but my pick hand. It just seems that no matter how hard i pick, the sound doesnt come out clear.
#20
Quote by tshare1
Electric is way more responsive. On the acoustic you have to hammer much harder, unless you are plugged in.


Hammers on an acoustic, even when plugged in, aren't nearly as clear as on an electric, but still decently loud. Pull offs are worse. If I do a pull off on my acoustic unplugged, I can barely hear a thing.
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#21
Quote by djgbsbj
Well iplayed acoustic for 6-7 months b4 i even had a electric. I used to play it with 12s but now the 10s are kind of hard. Its not my fretting hand that has trouble but my pick hand. It just seems that no matter how hard i pick, the sound doesnt come out clear.


Your hands have gotten lazy. Listen to Captivate and man up with some regular acoustic strings. You'll thank yourself later and you wont feel like a sissy when you try to play someone else's acoustic.

Also, if you can't pick a clear note on standard acoustic setup, having extra light electric strings will only worsen the problem.

Quote by captivate
Hammers on an acoustic, even when plugged in, aren't nearly as clear as on an electric, but still decently loud. Pull offs are worse. If I do a pull off on my acoustic unplugged, I can barely hear a thing.


I wouldn't exactly agree with this though. With enough time, hammer-ons and pull-offs can be played as clear as a bell unplugged. Ask any bluegrass flatpicker.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Jun 22, 2008,
#22
I've used jazz flattops on a guitar before, no harm done. Worked fine and sounded "different." I wouldn't do that to make up for poor strength though. Keep at it.
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