#1
Hey guys. I have a problem.
I have too many things to practice. I have so many ecxersisez and books and articles on techniiche and theory. All of this overwhelms me and at the end of the day i end up doing nothing. What should i do? I have all summer everyday to get my guitar playing to a level where it doesn't rape other peoples ears.
#3
I can do all the essential techniques. but none of them superfast and superclean.
#4
dude. **** techniques for now.
Just learn how to string a few simple chords together and then just play around.
When you feel that you're confident enough and you enjoy doing it...work on learning the techniques just to improve your playing.

but dont let technique become the main focus of your guitar playing
#5
Quote by shtiming
Hey guys. I have a problem.
I have too many things to practice. I have so many ecxersisez and books and articles on techniiche and theory. All of this overwhelms me and at the end of the day i end up doing nothing. What should i do? I have all summer everyday to get my guitar playing to a level where it doesn't rape other peoples ears.


Your right, doing to many things at once can cause you to lose focus and accomplish less.


I would recommend always keeping a good balance between exercises and actual music.


take a good look at everything and try to determine whats really important and relevant at this stage in your playing.

Keep in mind that it takes time. You don't have to learn everything this summer. take a manageable amount, balance it with music (songs, riffs, solos....). be patient and have fun.
shred is gaudy music
#6
Quote by Johnny Trash
but dont let technique become the main focus of your guitar playing

Why not? If he wants to study technique heavily, why shouldn't he?
#7
Quote by Johnny Trash
dude. **** techniques for now.
Just learn how to string a few simple chords together and then just play around.
When you feel that you're confident enough and you enjoy doing it...work on learning the techniques just to improve your playing.

but dont let technique become the main focus of your guitar playing


I can "string a few simple chords together and then play around". But thats not the point. The point is for me to get better technically and mentally. I play around everyday, and at the end of the day, guess what? I wish i did some serious practicing, because i realize most of the time i can not sound i wanted and therefore wasting a day.
#8
Quote by shtiming
I can "string a few simple chords together and then play around". But thats not the point. The point is for me to get better technically and mentally. I play around everyday, and at the end of the day, guess what? I wish i did some serious practicing, because i realize most of the time i can not sound i wanted and therefore wasting a day.


Play challenging songs too. Songs that work on techniques you want to learn but aren't too far out of reach. Eric Johnson said his workout mostly consists of playing music. If you want to new exercises, make exercises from cool licks that you can actually use.

I started learning two John Petrucci songs today and I'm satisfied and I feel like I've gotten at least a little better.
#9
Quote by :-D
Why not? If he wants to study technique heavily, why shouldn't he?


Because balance is important.

Don't forget about that thing that the technique allows you to do: play music.


also keep in mind that technical exercises aren't the only way to build technique.

what I would suggest to the TS is to define your goals, and then make a plan to achieve them. You just need to organize. Get rid of the clutter, so you can focus. Work on the things that apply towards your immediate goals and leave the rest for later.
shred is gaudy music
#10
Quote by GuitarMunky
also keep in mind that technical exercises aren't the only way to build technique.
The disadvantage with learning songs is that you won't be satisfied until you can play at full speed. With an exercise, you can set goals of 130 bpm after a week, 160 bpm after two weeks, etc, until you reach 220 bpm, and be satisfied after each week. With a song, you'll want to play at full speed and won't be happy until you can.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The disadvantage with learning songs is that you won't be satisfied until you can play at full speed. With an exercise, you can set goals of 130 bpm after a week, 160 bpm after two weeks, etc, until you reach 220 bpm, and be satisfied after each week. With a song, you'll want to play at full speed and won't be happy until you can.


the tempo on a metronome is not the only way to determine progress.

there is no disadvantage to learning songs period...... or anything for that matter.

IMO a practice regiment that doesn't include playing music is missing the whole point.

I would always recommend a balance. Never just exercises.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 16, 2008,
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The disadvantage with learning songs is that you won't be satisfied until you can play at full speed. With an exercise, you can set goals of 130 bpm after a week, 160 bpm after two weeks, etc, until you reach 220 bpm, and be satisfied after each week. With a song, you'll want to play at full speed and won't be happy until you can.


I dont know if thats always true. I learned the Glassgow kiss solo today but can't play it up to speed but still love playing it. And I stole a few licks and tried to implement them in my playing.

Its especially fun if you have Guitar Pro and can see what the person is doing over each chord.


I dont know, I just have fun learning in general, maybe its not the same with you people but I like the process. Of course I wish I was some ultimate shredder/musician/composer but its impossible to become one overnight, so enjoy the journey.

Also my technique is probably better than most people on the forum and I barely do exercises, I only did exercises when I first learned the guitar. After I became intermediate -> advanced I lowered it down a bit. If I decided to bust out exercises which is maybe 2-3 times a week, it lasts 2 hours at most.
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
there is no disadvantage to learning songs period...... or anything for that matter.

the tempo on a metronome is not the only way to determine progress.
Welp, if you go to your friends and say, "Look what I can play!" and then play the "Master of Puppets" solo at 170 bpm (the original tempo is 220), you will think it's cool but wonder why you can't play it at full speed yet. If you go to them with some fast exercise at 170 bpm, they have no source to judge how fast it should be, so it just sounds like fast awesomeness. The same applies to you.

That is a disadvantage. However, if you can deal with that, learning songs is more fun than exercises.

Ouchies: It isn't always true, but it is a concern. If you can be satisfied with playing something at 3/4 speed (and still ridiculously fast at that speed) knowing that you've made some improvement, then learn songs.
#14
Quote by GuitarMunky
Don't forget about that thing that the technique allows you to do: play music.

In the long run, absolutely. However, I was referring to a shorter-term idea; if you want to more quickly build up your technical ability, then focus heavily on technique for a while. Balance is important, but so is focus.
Quote by ouchies
Also my technique is probably better than most people on the forum

You know this how? I don't mean to sound like a jerk, but that comes off as a little arrogant.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Welp, if you go to your friends and say, "Look what I can play!" and then play the "Master of Puppets" solo at 170 bpm (the original tempo is 220), you will think it's cool but wonder why you can't play it at full speed yet. If you go to them with some fast exercise at 170 bpm, they have no source to judge how fast it should be, so it just sounds like fast awesomeness. The same applies to you.

That is a disadvantage. However, if you can deal with that, learning songs is more fun than exercises.


If you think its cool, and your friends dont.... thats their problem. And if you don't think its cool, then you should pick something more realistic for your skill level. Pick a song thats changeling but doable, or that you just really like.

tip:
don't play to impress your friends that will only think your cool if you play a fast exercise. impress yourself 1st, and chances are they will dig it to. If not ..... who cares.
shred is gaudy music
#16
Quote by :-D
Balance is important, but so is focus.

correct, they both are. You should always be able to have both.
shred is gaudy music
#17
i do have a place in my routine. IM currently learning always with me always with you and then some easy jazz tunes. (for sight reading)
#18
Personally, I practice technique very heavily, and ever since I started doing that, my ability to play "actual" music has gone up pretty heavily. I find what works is to combine the two, playing a song is one way to do it, but I feel that you get a better feel for it from relating intensive practice to playing.

Then again, the exercises I made up are centered heavily on repeating intervals in various ways. I feel that it's better to build musical ability in a somewhat theoretical environment, rather than completely experiential. Playing songs will show you some possibilities, but a well thought-out and executed practice plan, in my mind, will show you so many more, you simply have to make a mental connection to your music playing, rather than just "absorbing it." I believe that creates a more active position in composition and playing.

Personally, I'd work on intervals, playing them and hearing them, and every inversion you can possibly think of, all the way up and down the neck, on every string, that would be the focus of my practice, if I were you; however, I wouldn't make that the only pillar, I would practice scales to show some common intervals and to build a nice "safe-ground" that you can use anytime. Practicing actual songs, rather than purely exercises, is important, though; but don't rely on it to make you progress quickly in any one area, especially technically.

People that just play songs get to the same place as people that practice technique as well as songs, only the latter get there sooner (usually).

The whole basis of my practice regiment is this, you need a very solid foundation (e.g. interval practice), a good framework (scales and patterns), and a great finished product (actual songs, written yourself, or learning someone else's). Of course, that'll probably change in a little while, but for now I'm stickin' with it.

Hope that helps...
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#19
What I've been doing recently ( rather was, I've been studying like a ****tard. Exams.) is to pick a solo, split it, and use those parts to pratice the techinque. That way not only you learn a solo, you also pratice your technique...

Been doing it with the Symphony Of Destruction solo.
Last edited by Zealot's Fire at Jun 16, 2008,
#21
like everyone else has already said, training yourself to improve your technique of playing the guitar is important. likewise, learning songs is also important as it teaches you how to apply the technique that you have acquired in a more musical situation (other than spider exercises!). NOTE: i'm not saying shredding isn't musical. i'm saying that shredding up and down scales from root to root is rather unmusical after a while.

what i typically do is divide my time up between the things i want to learn. sit down and look at all of those theory articles that you have. do some go together? is one idea (i.e. harmonizing the major scale) built off of another idea(s) (the major scale, chord construction)? i would always try and group things together if possible. make your own categories so that it is clear to YOU, it doesn't matter what i have done or what anyone else has done.

from there i would also pick a few songs/solos that you really really enjoy. when you practice do some right hand exercises, then do some left hand, then do some synching. work on intervals. i would also work on choosing a random note and building any scale off of it (whether its major, minor harmonic minor). that way you'll begin to have a fluid knowledge of the fretboard. then with about a third to a half of your practice time i would practice songs. break them up into bits. if one part is easier to play than another, then practice the harder one more, making sure that you have it 100%, no unwanted string noise, no tension, no imprecise hand movements. build from there.

i'm a big fan of king crimson's Red as it has a good ascending scale line at the beginning, and then the rest of the song uses intervals with sparse chords. sounds cool.