#1
So, recently we decided to make an addition to our band. A rhythm guitarist. That means I will not be playing many power chords now so I have a general idea of what sort of stuff I should be playing in order to make the songs sound good but I was just wondering if anyone had any good tips as to what the lead guitarist should be playing in relation to what the rhythm guitarist is playing. I know it's a broad question but just bear with me. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
#2
Personally i think its awesome that you have decided to add a rhythm guitarist. i'm just a beginner so i do apologize for not being able to answer your question. i was also thinking the same thing though.
-Smittyb0y-
#3
octaves, harmonies, single note lead riffs, solos
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#4
You could do some melody things with octaves. What sort of bands are you influenced by?
#6
Quote by InanezGuitars44
octaves, harmonies, single note lead riffs, solos


Assuming you're punk/ska, harmonies wouldn't work to well. Well, I've never heard it in those genres, and can't imagine it sounding very good. Mind you I'm not much of a fan of it. It usually sounds realyl cheesy. There are exceptions ofcourse.
#7
Listen to the Clash if you want a really good example of rhythm and lead working together. Not many other punk bands really pulled that off, at least none I can think of off the top of my head.

You can play little single note riffs, octaves, the power chords he is playing in open or barre form, lots of stuff really, depending on the feel you're going for.
kill all humans
#8
Quote by Regression
Assuming you're punk/ska, harmonies wouldn't work to well. Well, I've never heard it in those genres, and can't imagine it sounding very good. Mind you I'm not much of a fan of it. It usually sounds realyl cheesy. There are exceptions ofcourse.


i think it sounds cool if you play a chord preogression, but instead of power chords you just play the root note. then have the other guitarist harmonize that. thrice does this in a few songs and it sounds awesome. and anyway, it would be refreshing to hear some "different" stuff in a punk song
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
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#9
Also listen to fugazi, you can really muck around with cross-rhythms, harmonies and stuff. Experiment with the sound you get out of the guitar, with harmonics, even noise if you like. It can really sound awesome.

Generally harmonies using octaves are cool, but look to play around with chords beyond just major and minor, you know? sus4 chords, add9s, even stuff that sound a completely dissonant can sound awesome with another guitar.

originality/experimentation is key.
#10
come up with riffs, harmonies, and solos?? that go over the rhythm's chords...that might be stepping outside the lines of the generally crappy punk guitar, but in all seriousness, you should really try that.
#14
i never thought it was necessary to have a 2nd guitarist when it comes to punk. but if you're going to play more than power chords and only have one guitarist, then you'd need a few pedals. like a harmonizer/octave and delay pedal for the guitar and possibly an overdrive for the bass.
#15
Quote by InanezGuitars44
octaves, harmonies, single note lead riffs, solos

yeah, im self taught so i dont even know what octaves or harmonies are I'll look into it though.
#16
Quote by Regression
You could do some melody things with octaves. What sort of bands are you influenced by?

As far as bands with 2 guitarists go, The Unseen, Senses Fail(I don't really like their style of music but I love the way they coordinate their rhythm and lead), Streetlight Manifesto, Rancid, Pennywise, The Offspring, Leftover Crack, etc.
#17
Quote by recklessnick
i never thought it was necessary to have a 2nd guitarist when it comes to punk. but if you're going to play more than power chords and only have one guitarist, then you'd need a few pedals. like a harmonizer/octave and delay pedal for the guitar and possibly an overdrive for the bass.

yeah i have a pedal with 80 customizable effects and a wah pedal. it works pretty nicely.
#18
I second the Fugazi recommendation.

My advice is don't force a second guitar part. It's fine to play the same thing as the other guitarist every once in a while.
#19
Quote by werty22
My advice is don't force a second guitar part. It's fine to play the same thing as the other guitarist every once in a while.

+1
#20
For some sexy guitar interplay, try Television and Drive Like Jehu. Stylistically those probably aren't what you're aiming for, but take inspiration from wherever you can.
#21
Don't automatically stray away from playing along with the other guitarists. Having two guitarists playing the chords can really give your song a nice kick.
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#22
My band has two guitarists. We make the rhythm guitarist play barre chords and then I usually play open chords/triads/leads over what he plays.
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#24
Quote by Myechtatel
yeah, im self taught so i dont even know what octaves or harmonies are I'll look into it though.


octaves are things like this


E
B
G-9
D-x
A-7
E
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


╠═══════╬═══════╣
τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
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#25
For punk, pentatonic leads work really well. Plus, they're really simple.

Octaves and triads work good too.
#26
Quote by pinheadslts75
For punk, pentatonic leads work really well. Plus, they're really simple.

Octaves and triads work good too.


Ok with the triads and octaves, but pentatonic leads? Maybe in a small solo, and even that should be kept rare, they sound far too basic.

Also +1 to the New York Dolls recommendation.
#27
Octaves are great in punk music, have a look at Millencolin. They have a rhythm and lead guitarist, and IMO they write great music. Particularly songs like "Afghan" or "Kemp".
Even the Offspring use octaves a fair amount as well
#28
The Asian Man tour came around to St. Louis last week and it was interesting to see what Joe Queer did as the lead guitarist and vocalist.

Most of the time he played right along with the 2nd guitarist and it worked fine. Other times he threw in the simple melodic solos that bands like the Queers are known for. The Most interesting thing he did, I think, is play the same chords as the 2nd guitarist, but play them past the 12th fret, in other words, an octave up. It really seemed to fill out their sound while not making things too complicated.

Another thing I've learned from being in a band that plays music more complicated than straight up punk is that, at times, silence is sometimes the most effective "note"(if thats what you call it). Having one guitar play at a time can definitely be a good thing. It will only add to the power of your sound when you double up with the second guitarist.

My favorite thing to do with two guitarists is double up on a fast and simple riff. I think it just makes the riff sound that much nicer.

a good band to listen too, I think, would be MC5.
#29
I would say that most guitar players don't have the ability to stetch their sound over the mix, which requires more guitar players.

A lot of bands with two guitarists don't have very good interaction between the playing and tones, which is somewhat annoying. If you aren't good enough to do the guitar by yourself, at least learn to sound half decent with your bitch guitarist.
#30
Fortunatly for me, my other guitarist and I have been playing together for a couple years so by now we're pretty tight.
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#31
It's not a question of tightness, it's a question of creativity and orchestration.

You shouldn't go around confirming the stereotype that punk is lacking in the trouser department.
#32
cool thanks for the help guys. as for playing the same thing as the rhythm, it kinda defeats the purpose of a lead because shouldn't the lead guitar be a little louder than everyone else? and that would just drown everyone out. i guess in very small doses it wouldnt hurt though. better than standing there doing nothing.
#33
Quote by BrianApocalypse
I would say that most guitar players don't have the ability to stetch their sound over the mix, which requires more guitar players.

A lot of bands with two guitarists don't have very good interaction between the playing and tones, which is somewhat annoying. If you aren't good enough to do the guitar by yourself, at least learn to sound half decent with your bitch guitarist.


In solos it´s really helpful to have a second guitar which does the rhythm work, furthermore, live it´s sometiems good to create a wall of sound, and then it´s not bad when two guitars play the same stuff
#34
Half the story, of course, is having a decent bass player.

Someone like Klaus Flouride, who has a surf rock type brightness and presence to his sound, and plays a lot of high octave stuff will tend to remove the need for a second guitar player.

Most bass players in bands tend to be whoever the ****test guitarist is, so they don't really have a feel for the textures, timbres and tones they could create to fill out the rhythm by themselves. Bassists are so used to playing with 3 guitarists, there's no sense of fullness.

I'm going to be auditioning bass players in the next couple of months, and they'll be required to play with just drums. Most of these people won't be able to fill out the rhythm section properly.

Although having said that, anyone tuning to F# will automatically sound fuller.

I know a couple of good bass players, but they're into wacky syncopated stuff like Primus, and I need someone who plays like John McVie on speed - keep the sound going, substitute notes to change the harmonic ambience and do some really simple but super-effective licks and fills.
#35
well generally, for verses and stuff you could probably just double up and fill the sound out or play a harmony riff...

for chrouses, you could add in an extra melody line
then of course there are solos
Top lel.
#38
if we are talking about punk id say something high-toned, obviously if the other guitarist plays power chords, but the power chords can never miss in punk rock.