#1
Over the past 3 weeks I have been heavily commited to some important exams that are of great importance to me, and so have neglected my beloved acoustic guitar considerably. In the time before this I adopted an intense and discplined practice schedule so I could achieve the goal I had set, namely: to be able to alternate pick like Al Di Meola and John Mclaughlin. However the acoustic guitar is a very unforgiving instrument for someone with poor technique, and having practiced extremely little over these past few weeks I am literally back at square one, and am utterly demoralized.I was willing to devote myself to this technique for hours a day, yet now am unwilling to confront my inadequacy.


I'm sure many of you are aware of this kind of problem, so what do you do when trying to 'get back into it', and find inspiration/motivation? What are your thoughts?

PS. I have posted this elsewhere as I am aware that this problem is faced almost universally by musicians.
#2
i am sure that you are not back at square one. you know how to pick. you are comfortable. you have some synchronization between your hands.

just start slow again and build up comfortably. don't "cram" your practice just as you wouldn't cram before an exam and expect to remember it all. just work on it and take comfort in the fact that when you are playing at slow speeds your technique is brilliant and just like Al di Meola's or John's, only slower. as you improve you'll approach the level you want.

i have recently had to completely "renovate" my technique due to poor pick control and unwanted string noise, which all was aresult of not practicing properly. now i know that i'm doing it correctly i am even more motivated than before as i have solved the problems i set out to solve, i am able to solve any new technique problems that may come up and that i am on the path to playing how i want to play.

think positive and stay focused, you're practice can and will motivate you.
#3
Sorry if i'm telling you stuff you already know:

Keep your picking wrist lose (loose? you know what I mean), and don't tense it up.

I found the right hand exercises in Petrucci's "Rock Discipline" to be extremely valuable to developing my right hand, although it's played on electric, but I think it will translate.
#4
slow "teh" **** down. speed comes from comfort. i sat in front a metronome for like a year and I got faster but ive since stopped that and just played musically at my comfort zone making sure tension is non existent and my technique has gotten like 100x better. egg babie
#5
or you can do like me and most kids when they first learn to play.
Go stupid fast all down strokes..for the first year.
This way when you go up and down it'll be twice as fast.
It helps if you're left handed and the left hand is on the fretboard.
But it wasn't clean.

Seriouly, if you slow down ...aside from just picking speed.
Pay attention to left hand, fingering movement, vibrato...etc
This too will effect now clean your playing is.
Last edited by Ordinary at Jun 17, 2008,
#6
To quote a portion at the beginning of Mick Goodrick's "Almanac of Guitar Voice-Leading"

"Don't try to learn it. In fact, try not to learn learn it. If you don't try to learn it, you completely eliminate any self-imposed pressure. You just have the experience of going through the material. That will be enough. There are so many aspects and ways in which a guitarist can learn "all this stuff", that you don't want to shortchange yourself by "learning" it too fast ... Don't be in a hurry. Take your time. Find your own pace. Relax into your own learning process, and let the material do to you (and with you) what it (and you) need. It and you both need time to grow."

Anyway simply being able to replicate a feat is the lowest form of learning. You can't do anything with that; this is why cramming is ineffective, because you don't learn. Resume your study, slowly but effectively.

A lot of people trick themselves into thinking that hard work, especially if it involves any kind of personal sacrifice (health, time, friends, &c), must create results. This is not true. Work smarter instead.
#8
Quote by Nick_
To quote a portion at the beginning of Mick Goodrick's "Almanac of Guitar Voice-Leading"

"Don't try to learn it. In fact, try not to learn learn it. If you don't try to learn it, you completely eliminate any self-imposed pressure. You just have the experience of going through the material. That will be enough. There are so many aspects and ways in which a guitarist can learn "all this stuff", that you don't want to shortchange yourself by "learning" it too fast ... Don't be in a hurry. Take your time. Find your own pace. Relax into your own learning process, and let the material do to you (and with you) what it (and you) need. It and you both need time to grow."

Anyway simply being able to replicate a feat is the lowest form of learning. You can't do anything with that; this is why cramming is ineffective, because you don't learn. Resume your study, slowly but effectively.

A lot of people trick themselves into thinking that hard work, especially if it involves any kind of personal sacrifice (health, time, friends, &c), must create results. This is not true. Work smarter instead.


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