#1
okay, I just watched the Doug fearman lesson thing on the main page here, and was confused by how he applied the pentatonic scale.

In the key of C, he used the C minor pentatonic. I thought if you were in C, you would use the A minor pentatonic, because the minor pentatonic is a replacement for the minor scale. If you overlap the box patterns of the minor pentatonic and Aeolian, they overlap perfectly. If you overlap the minor pentatonic and Ionian, it doesnt work.
so my question is: wtf?

edit: real question: why did he use the C min pentationic not the A?
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Last edited by sacamano79 at Jun 17, 2008,
#3
it just says key of C
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#4
What are the chords?

Probably it's in C Minor. Maybe he's applying that old blues trick of playing minor above major background?
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#5
Quote by sacamano79
okay, I just watched the Doug fearman lesson thing on the main page here, and was confused by how he applied the pentatonic scale.

In the key of C, he used the C minor pentatonic. I thought if you were in C, you would use the A minor pentatonic, because the minor pentatonic is a replacement for the minor scale. If you overlap the box patterns of the minor pentatonic and Aeolian, they overlap perfectly. If you overlap the minor pentatonic and Ionian, it doesnt work.
so my question is: wtf?

edit: real question: why did he use the C min pentationic not the A?



Was he playing blues? Blues often uses a flattened 3rd and 7th degree in a major key in an attempt to limit chromaticism. Therefore if the piece was in C major, he would have used the C minor pentatonic to create a bluesy sound.
#6
yea it was blues, guess that answers it. thanks
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#7
General rule of thumb=you solo in the key that your IN, regardless or whether or not you're playing a blues. That way, your solos sound like actual music. Are you thinking of A being the relative major of C minor?
#8
Quote by sacamano79
okay, I just watched the Doug fearman lesson thing on the main page here, and was confused by how he applied the pentatonic scale.

In the key of C, he used the C minor pentatonic. I thought if you were in C, you would use the A minor pentatonic, because the minor pentatonic is a replacement for the minor scale. If you overlap the box patterns of the minor pentatonic and Aeolian, they overlap perfectly. If you overlap the minor pentatonic and Ionian, it doesnt work.
so my question is: wtf?

edit: real question: why did he use the C min pentationic not the A?


He used C min pentatonic because he was in the key of C - what's so hard to understand about that?

The minor pentatonic isn't a "replacement" for the minor scale, it's just a different scale with less notes. If he was in the key of A he'd have used A minor or A minor pentatonic.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jun 17, 2008,
#9
Quote by steven seagull
He used C min pentatonic because he was in the key of C - what's so hard to understand about that?

The minor pentatonic isn't a "replacement" for the minor scale, it's just a different scale with less notes. If he was in the key of A he'd have used A minor or A minor pentatonic.


If someone refers to "the key of C" they usually mean major. At least in my experience with music teachers.

So you can see why he would be confused by someone using a minor scale with the same tonic.