#1
So I was up at the local guitar shop digging around for something to get me the old rock tones that I really like and I came across a couple different chambered solid-bodies. An old Stratotone, which sounded amazing btw, and a couple chambered Les Pauls. My main gripe is that they just weren't comfortable. I tend to really hunker down when I really get into it and I just hate running into the edge of the guitar. I'll play an hour and my ribs will just be killing me, hehe. So, have any of you any recommendations for a good chambered guitar with a decent rib/belly cut or something equally comfortable?
#2
why does it have to be chambered ?


a strat or jazzmaster are both comfort contoured and incredibly comfortable...
though not chambered.
#3
The Jackson Dominion is chambered and can be used from everything from metal to jazz/blues, and when I played it I was very impressed with all the features, just I'm a 7 guy so I wasn't into buying one.
#4
Quote by The red Strat.
why does it have to be chambered ?


a strat or jazzmaster are both comfort contoured and incredibly comfortable...
though not chambered.



You're right, those are both very comfortable and I really love some of the tones I could get with a Jazzmaster, but I've been able to manipulate some fat feedback sounds with that Stratotone that I just couldnt seem to extract from the Fenders. Plus a good friend of mine is a Fender nut and currently owns or has owned nearly every model they've offered, so I'd like to be a little different.
#5
Epi Les Paul Ultra.
Ibanez RG321MH (Air Classic/Tone Zone)
Fernandes Telecaster (Twang King/stock bridge pickup)
Blackstar HT-20 (Scumback 55 speaker/ Tung Sol tubes)
TC Electronic Nova Repeater
Lava Cables Clear Connect, Soar and Mini ELC
#6
Epiphone Les Paul Ultra might be a good idea.

Why not consider some Semi-Hollow guitars too?

Actually, something like a Fender Thinline might be ideal...
Ibanez PGM301
Ibanez GRG170DX
Fender Telecaster MiJ - 1986
Swing T-Through

Ibanez TS9DX
Sovtek Small Stone - c.1985
EHX Big Muff
Kimbara Wah - c.1974
Boss GE-7

Orange Rocker 30 Combo

http://www.myspace.com/paythelay
#7
the best solution is to not hunker down.

good posture's important.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#8
I'm not always bent over the guitar and generally have decent posture, it's just the moments I am bent are intense, hehe. Also, like everyone, I play a lot while sitting and just find the belly cut to be the single thing that really makes, for me, a comfortable guitar.

I never have played an Epi LP Ultra, so I'll try my best to hunt one down. Seem pretty versatile from the reviews I've read on them.

That Jackson Dominion looks on paper/pictures to really fit the bill of what I was looking for, thanks. I'm pretty sure I will have to track it down. Does anyone else have any experience with them?
#9
try sitting in the classical position. the guitar wont be under your arm if you play that way so the sharp edges shouldn't affect you.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#11
Isn't chambered solid body kind of an oximoron?

I guess I would say a Gretsch Do Jet is a chambered guitar but that means it's not solid.
#12
Quote by SenorSmiley
Isn't chambered solid body kind of an oximoron?

I guess I would say a Gretsch Do Jet is a chambered guitar but that means it's not solid.


Yeah, I suppose it is an oxymoron. I've just always heard chambered guitars as referenced as a solid body. Maybe because of their construction being a routed out solid blank with a thicker top and no f-holes as opposed to thinner, bent sides and thin top with f-holes? I'm just guessing. At any rate, the only Gretsch I've ever played was an old Country Gentelman, which was fun, but really not what I wanted. The smaller Duo Jet could prove to be more in my line. It'll be cheaper, too
#13
my guitar fits the description. Gibson LP std faded.
Gear
Gibson Les Paul std faded, Godin LG
Marshall jcm900
Keeley ds1, maxon od808, boston tu500, RMC Wizard
#14
Quote by Atmosfear
Yeah, I suppose it is an oxymoron. I've just always heard chambered guitars as referenced as a solid body. Maybe because of their construction being a routed out solid blank with a thicker top and no f-holes as opposed to thinner, bent sides and thin top with f-holes? I'm just guessing. At any rate, the only Gretsch I've ever played was an old Country Gentelman, which was fun, but really not what I wanted. The smaller Duo Jet could prove to be more in my line. It'll be cheaper, too



I think chambered is just a buzz word. For years Gibson made the BB-King model which was always referred to as "semi-hollow" just like an ES-335 would be.

Same thing with Duo Jets (which have no f-holes) and Telecaster thinlines, etc....

BTW - wasn't picking on you. I just think the term is funny

Duo Jets are cool. if you can get an Elliot Easton DJ it's better because it has a Tune-O-Matic instead of the bridge that is not attached to anything.
#15
You might try the yamaha AES620:
http://www.thomann.de/gb/yamaha_aes620hb_bl.htm

Or if you have a little more scratch (and provided you can find one of these), the Framus Pantherea Classic. There are Pro and Custom versions, the latter being the superior model:
http://www.musik-produktiv.co.uk/framus-panthera-classic-pro.aspx
http://www.musik-produktiv.co.uk/framus-panthera-classic-custom.aspx
#16
Well, I know Gibson has chambered many guitars for the sake of weight relief due to inconsistent wood and what-not, but only within the past few years have I heard of them doing it with more sonic purposes in mind. Maybe that's why it's been getting the buzz word treatment. All I know is that I like what I hear when I play them =)

As to the 335s and the Lucille, well, I've sat down with a few 335s and while I like the tone, I just can't get into them. I mean, I'm not a large individual and all I can see them fitting with are some hefty dudes. I know, poor reason for passing on a classic like that, but something just isn't right about them unless BB King or Freddie King or someone equally large throws it over their shoulders. I mean, have you seen pictures/video of Chuck Berry? That guitar is as big as he is, haha.
#17
Gibson never to my knowledge did this due to inconsistent wood - they did it becasue some people didn't like the weight of the LP - akthough if you ever play a boat anchor era Fender (late 74 -> 79) they are about 500lbs.

I was using the 335 as an example, but once you get used to one they don't feel so big. Next time you see Chuck with his look at how big his hands are!

It's all preference, so no need to appologize for not wanting to check one out.

Gibson makes a smaller 335 now (I forget the name) but there is a lot out there so look around
#18
Yeah, the 339, which plays and sounds pretty awesome. The local shop had a Blemished one for cheap but it got bought up before I could commit to it.
#19
Quote by bowen
The Jackson Dominion is chambered and can be used from everything from metal to jazz/blues, and when I played it I was very impressed with all the features, just I'm a 7 guy so I wasn't into buying one.


Where did you try one? I've been wanting to try one since Morton's sig was announched, but haven't found it ANYWHERE. The Chambered body concept sounds cool too.


Also, i think someone asked isn't a chambered solid body guitar an oxymoron? A chambered body guitar is basically a semi hollow body, but not in the concept of having two hollow pockets. It normally has a variety of hollowed areas on it that help give it the fatness or a semi, but because there are no f-holes (seeing as the guitar has a full covering over the top), it sounds slightly different and unique compared to a semi. I believe www.warmoth.com has some info on chambered guitars if you want to take a look. I also think chambering cuts down on the feedback (of course, you can get great controlled feedback, as with any guitar). So instead of having to stuff t-shirts, socks, or foam in your semi, you can just play as normal and get a fat sound if you're using a lot of distortion. I'd say Lamb of God is a great example of that, but both Mark and Willie DOUBLE GATE their rigs. >_> Still, if you've seen them do demos for guitar world, Mark gets barely any background noise even though he presumably pushes the studio's amps kinda hard to mimick the gain on the Mesas they use.

EDIT: Forgot to mention, the difference in the sound is in the physics of the build. I'd give you a full explanation, but one of my friends gave me the run down, and he's a huge science nerd, and it kinda confused the hell outta me, but i got the idea. Hopefully my half-assed explanation helps.
Last edited by RG_FANMAN at Jun 18, 2008,