#1
I decided I want to go to school for music and after that open a music school (I'm 17 now, 1 more year until high-school is done), but I have 3 questions about uni music..

1) Where do they start at, theory-wise? I don't want to go there knowing nothing in comparison to everyone else there, I mean.. There is only so much to know, right?

2) How long do people usually go for? (I was thinking regular uni, 4 years..)

3) What do you do there? Just study music theory all day? Write songs? Play your instruments?


By the way, I know I don't need a degree to open a music school (lots of people don't), but I'd like to have credibility, as well as know as much as possible..
#2
Quote by Dog--
I decided I want to go to school for music and after that open a music school (I'm 17 now, 1 more year until high-school is done), but I have 3 questions about uni music..

1) Where do they start at, theory-wise? I don't want to go there knowing nothing in comparison to everyone else there, I mean.. There is only so much to know, right?

2) How long do people usually go for? (I was thinking regular uni, 4 years..)

3) What do you do there? Just study music theory all day? Write songs? Play your instruments?


By the way, I know I don't need a degree to open a music school (lots of people don't), but I'd like to have credibility, as well as know as much as possible..



1) they start at the real basics to make sure everyone can read properly dont worry about theory so much as being able to read properly.

2) 4 years where i went

3) everything from music production recording, composition, learning to be a teacher, improv, jazz etc

I opened my music school without a degree i just got one to enhance my learning, i could have done most of it with the internet but you need great discipline to do all that stuff yourself and the faciliies help.
#3
I'm going into my 4th year at UBC studying music education. Let's see...

1) They start at the beginning. I had some theory knowledge from high school so I had a slight head start on some people who didn't know anything but they caught up. You'll probably be fine
2) I'm doing 4 years to finish my music degree then going for another year to get my teaching degree.
3)Theory, ear training, history, playing music in various groups and non music electives. I'm doing music education so I'm also learning all the rest of the band instruments
#4
Yea, that's what I was saying, I didn't want to open a music school knowing a bunch of stuff from the internet, although it helps, I'd rather have as much hands on learning as possible, except I can't afford a teacher for individual lessons (I know, I'm going to uni for it, but it's complicated). I mean, would you rather go to the guy who says he knows alot, or has a degree for knowing alot?

Anything else I should know?

Do you need good grades and all the best classes to get in? Was it hard for you to get in? I plan on going to Toronto University for music, it's the closest to me (and I live like 3 hours away).
#5
You're going to need some serious lessons. I recommend you find a teacher who studied at the school you're applying to and take lessons right up until your audition, and afterwards. Check the site for the school, it will give you a list of requirements and what you have to perform for an audition. Your teacher will help you nail that down.

As for your theory question, there is far, far more than you think there is, and there's no way you'll be able to get it all learned by yourself through the internet.

The number of years you study depends entirely on what you decide to go into, and how you spend your time there also depends on this.

You'll get a lot more information on university websites than we can give you, and from your teacher (I'm assuming you'll get one).

EDIT: okay, new posts. The amount you need to know prior to entering school varies depending on where you're going (I'm going to St. Francis Xavier, and they're pretty demanding). I think University of Toronto is one of those high-requirement schools.

Also, I know places like Memorial University of Newfoundland require that you know everything there is to know prior to applying.
Last edited by The Pickle Man at Jun 17, 2008,
#6
The theory I only asked about because right now I'm working on memorizing the notes (I know them, but for some it takes me like 2 seconds to get them, and I want to get them instantly, I can on the E strings, not the others, although I can do pretty good), and it's not very far along, this summer I plan on learning the entire Beginner Theory lesson on this site, and know it all like the back of my hand (I've never really had time to practice, but since It's summer there is no school, it gives me 2.5 months almost solid (besides like 3 days a week for work) to learn these things). I know other stuff, like the keys (major and minor) I got memorized like no bodies business, I got most intervals done, triads I got down. But other then that almost nothing, it's not very much which is why I asked about the level at which uni starts at. But according to you guys, I'm right at the level?
#7
Quote by Dog--
The theory I only asked about because right now I'm working on memorizing the notes (I know them, but for some it takes me like 2 seconds to get them, and I want to get them instantly, I can on the E strings, not the others, although I can do pretty good), and it's not very far along, this summer I plan on learning the entire Beginner Theory lesson on this site, and know it all like the back of my hand (I've never really had time to practice, but since It's summer there is no school, it gives me 2.5 months almost solid (besides like 3 days a week for work) to learn these things). I know other stuff, like the keys (major and minor) I got memorized like no bodies business, I got most intervals done, triads I got down. But other then that almost nothing, it's not very much which is why I asked about the level at which uni starts at. But according to you guys, I'm right at the level?



yeah you want to be ontop in the class because its tough enough in most classes to be catching up all the time you should get a grip of what chords fit in which key how to build chords etc, also work on your interval ear training the musictheory.net has some good trainers on that
#8
What about the high-school classes?

I took all Applied classes (three levels, Academic ('uni) Applied ('college') and Essential ('retarded'), would I need all Academic to get in? Cause if so, I'm screwed..

Also, would I need 4 years of music? I couldn't take 4 years (I took 2, and I still have one year to go, I have no problem taking grade 11 music in grade 12 and taking grade 12 music the same year.

I never actually thought I would ever go to university (only two or three people in my entire family - both sides, including relatives have ever gone to school after high-school, and even then it was college), so I have no idea what to expect.. With looking at the site it looks like it'll be good fun learning about recording, jazz, theory and all that, but looks like it'll be hard work as well..
#9
There's many different options when considering music school. First off, I'm assuming you're a guitar player. If so, then you have to think about whether you want a practical, but less reputable school like Berklee/Musician's Institute, or a classically-oriented conservatory.

At Berklee/MI, your playing will develop greatly and you'll receive great instruction, but its risky getting a job out of places like these. If you just want gigs, these would be great schools.

The latter, a more traditional music school, is either classical or jazz- no shredding here. While they won't train you to be the next great metal god, it's far, far easier to get a steady career (and um, paycheck) out of here. If you want to apply, just about all the good places want you to know classical guitar, even if you plan to be a jazz major. Classical guitar is much more different than most people think it is, so start early.

Whatever you do, keep an open mind. I started out learning classical with the intentions of being a jazz major, but I actually like it a lot better. It's difficult, but you can do some crazy stuff. Not to mention the girls love it...
#10
Well, I don't have much choice of where I want to go, it's pretty much Toronto or nothing.

I plan on learning every style I can, be it Classical, Metal, Rock, Jazz, Reggae, Blues, I want to be a teacher, but the problem with teachers is that most of them only stick to one thing, so the majority of their students are bored because they want to play something other then folk or classical (which my teacher made me play, and at 11 years old I thought the only cool thing was rockin solos, I love every music now though), so if I am into all of these, I can adjust the lesson plan accordingly. My main focus for being a teacher is to make sure the student has fun, because they'll put their instrument down pretty fast if they get frustrated.

But the main thing I want to get out of all of this is to better myself. What better way to make a living then to do what you love and help people out doing it?