#1
Is there any reason why even the master volume is linear instead of log based? I can understand it when Gain use it...
Ibanez SA-120 (ed.2006)
BluesJr 1996-B + cathode follower + texas Heat
Crate CPB150
Homemade 4 x 10 cab Bass closeback
Metal Muff
#2
Oh dear - Disregard what I said, I had it wrong. Thanks for the link Jim. It looks like I have some reading to do.
Because it'd be like - turning it down and get almost no change until the end when all volume would drop off or the other way around, you'd do a small turn and lose all volume and then continue to rotate with no change.
Looking at this picture (nothing really, just googled something quickly)
Linear is the blue line - you get an even change over time (amount rotated)
Logarithmic is green and you get it basically all at once

Last edited by guitar/bass76 at Jun 18, 2008,
#4
Quote by guitar/bass76
Because it'd be like - turning it down and get almost no change until the end when all volume would drop off or the other way around, you'd do a small turn and lose all volume and then continue to rotate with no change.

Looking at this picture (nothing really, just googled something quickly)
Linear is the blue line - you get an even change over time (amount rotated)
Logarithmic is green and you get it basically all at once


AFAIK, it's the other way around. I understood that Master Volumes should be audio taper pots as the ear hears volume in a logarithmic fashion. With a linear type you'd hear a large volume with the first few degree's of turn but very little difference after that whereas a log taper pot "fools" the ear into percieving even volume increase/decrease with each degree turn of the pot.
I could well be wrong on this though.
#6
Usually amps' volume controls are audio taper. Fender uses linear tapers so the amp seems louder. You know, you go into the shop, turn a 50W marshall to 4, it sounds reasonably loud because it's a audio taper. Then you plug into the 40W hot rod and turn it to 4 and it's putting out 4X the output percentage of the audio-taper marshall, so you think "wow! that's a powerful amp!" and you buy it.
...at least that's what the marketing department at fender had in mind. I think it's a dumb idea, but they do it anyway.
#8
Quote by Roc8995
Usually amps' volume controls are audio taper. Fender uses linear tapers so the amp seems louder. You know, you go into the shop, turn a 50W marshall to 4, it sounds reasonably loud because it's a audio taper. Then you plug into the 40W hot rod and turn it to 4 and it's putting out 4X the output percentage of the audio-taper marshall, so you think "wow! that's a powerful amp!" and you buy it.
...at least that's what the marketing department at fender had in mind. I think it's a dumb idea, but they do it anyway.


Thanks for answering my question. So it IS a good idea to change it to a log pot, right? I am worry whether using a log pot will affect the power amp crunch...
Ibanez SA-120 (ed.2006)
BluesJr 1996-B + cathode follower + texas Heat
Crate CPB150
Homemade 4 x 10 cab Bass closeback
Metal Muff
#9
Quote by Jestersage
I am worry whether using a log pot will affect the power amp crunch...
Don't plug guitar into it; just use it as hi-fi if it works.

srsly, the taper of the pot only affects the relationship of the knob position, relative to the volume. all the same volume levels will be there. they'll just be distributed differently along the rotation of the knob.


if a setting of "8" on the new log pot gives you the same volume as "5" did on the old linear pot, the "power amp crunch" will be exactly the same.

and 10 will always be 10, regardless of the taper.
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