#1
i'm going to be jamming with someone next week who i've never jammed with before (craigslist)
i want to make sure i'm up to it.

could you suggest some scales or chords that i could practice.
i guess i need something that would be good for all purpose that i could practice slow and keep getting faster

really what i want is something to practice so that my playing is tighter, and less loose

so any ideas?


oh umm style is garage rock and funk (if that helps)


thanks i really appreiciate it
Last edited by guitaruboy at Jun 18, 2008,
#2
for funk, 7th and 9th chords are a neccesity. For garage rock, I'd say mainly power chords but I'm not sure exactly what garage rock means.

for scales, go for the pentatonics and major scales I'd say. Neither genre uses exotic or minor scales frequently as far as I know.
#3
For funk you could learn chords on the three highest strings and play them staccato to make some funky rhythms.
#4
Funk uses some diminished chords in their progressions as turn arounds. Maybe you should increase your knowledge on diminished chords. Also, even though 6th chords are used in mainly in blues and sometimes in jazz, 6th chords are also used in funk.
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#5
Quote by jasonmetal love
Funk uses some diminished chords in their progressions as turn arounds. Maybe you should increase your knowledge on diminished chords. Also, even though 6th chords are used in mainly in blues and sometimes in jazz, 6th chords are also used in funk.


Not really. They basically stay pentatonic in funk. You have to remember that in the day, most funk musicians, or most famous musicians at all, had no formal or classical training. If you asked most musicians from the time period what a diminished chord is, they wouldnt be able to tell you.
#6
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Not really. They basically stay pentatonic in funk. You have to remember that in the day, most funk musicians, or most famous musicians at all, had no formal or classical training. If you asked most musicians from the time period what a diminished chord is, they wouldnt be able to tell you.


True, but if you played a diminished chord to some guy who has been playing funk for decades, I'm pretty sure he would have played that same chord at some point in his musical career. Just because he may not know its name doesn't mean he has no clue what it is or how to use it.
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#7
well, most top tier professionals I know of know what they are doing in terms of theory. Maybe some don't, but the large majority do. And those minority, spend years around countless musicians absorbing the same knowledge, they just don't know the words for it.
#8
In my opinion, it doesn't matter what scales or chords you use. If you want to play funk, it's all about note choice and phrasing. There's a really funky song by Paul Gilbert called "Rusty Old Boat" that is played entirely in Em pentatonic...So there you go.
#9
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Not really. They basically stay pentatonic in funk. You have to remember that in the day, most funk musicians, or most famous musicians at all, had no formal or classical training. If you asked most musicians from the time period what a diminished chord is, they wouldnt be able to tell you.


Like others said, they might not be able to tell you but they definitely DO use those types of chords...
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