#4
if you have a tube amp on overdrive, you can roll down the volume knob to control gain
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#5
or you can just buy 1 made by emg called the afterburner it replaces ur tone nob and works a a push pull nob en in its a norm tone nob pull it out and u have a gain control its like 40 dollars
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#6
you already have a gain knob on your guitar. its called the volume control.
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#7
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#8
o0o0o - i like the sound of the afterburner thing

and yeah - i get what your saying about rolling off the volume knob to control gain. you mentioned tubes, whereas i only own transistors - i dont know how much of a difference that makes to this particular thing, but when i do that, though it does sound less gainy, the sound is thicker, rather than nice and bright and clean like i want it to be

alternative idea - is it possible to wire pickups so that one has like a gain limiter or something (i just made up the name, i dont know what it would be called) so that i could have one pickup for clean, and one pickup for distort? i know i could use a pedal, but this is purely a case of seeing what can be done rather than for any practical thing.
#9
Quote by CobenBlack
o0o0o - i like the sound of the afterburner thing

and yeah - i get what your saying about rolling off the volume knob to control gain. you mentioned tubes, whereas i only own transistors - i dont know how much of a difference that makes to this particular thing, but when i do that, though it does sound less gainy, the sound is thicker, rather than nice and bright and clean like i want it to be

alternative idea - is it possible to wire pickups so that one has like a gain limiter or something (i just made up the name, i dont know what it would be called) so that i could have one pickup for clean, and one pickup for distort? i know i could use a pedal, but this is purely a case of seeing what can be done rather than for any practical thing.


The Afterburner is an overpriced EMG product.

Have a look here: http://www.axetec.co.uk/axetec%20guitar%20parts%20spares%20pickups_090.htm

You just wire them up in series with the pickups you want them to affect. So, if you only want the gain boost on one pickup, you put it before the toggle. If you want it to affect both, put it before the jack.
#10
Quote by -MintSauce-
The Afterburner is an overpriced EMG product.

Have a look here: http://www.axetec.co.uk/axetec%20guitar%20parts%20spares%20pickups_090.htm

You just wire them up in series with the pickups you want them to affect. So, if you only want the gain boost on one pickup, you put it before the toggle. If you want it to affect both, put it before the jack.



its only a one pickup guitar anyway - so i'll put it before the toggle.

just out of curiosity - how does it work? how does it add gain to the guitar?
#11
Quote by CobenBlack
its only a one pickup guitar anyway - so i'll put it before the toggle.

just out of curiosity - how does it work? how does it add gain to the guitar?


They have little solidstate preamps in there, which boost the signal from the pickup. They usually add 10-20dB of adjustable gain, depending on the specific mod. Just be careful about pairing one with a bad pickup, because it'll end up sounding significantly worse.

Edit: It's like having a tiny, very basic booster pedal inside your guitar, with the 9v battery tucked in there too.
#12
Quote by -MintSauce-
They have little solidstate preamps in there, which boost the signal from the pickup. They usually add 10-20dB of adjustable gain, depending on the specific mod. Just be careful about pairing one with a bad pickup, because it'll end up sounding significantly worse.


ah, thats what i mean - i suppose im asking - how does a pre- amp work - how does it go from being a pickup signal, through a little circuit board, and suddenly become a different sound, just from going through a circuit.

and it should be ok with the pickups, its for a build im going to be doing in a few weeks (guitar made of teak for anyone who's interested) so im getting hold of the best quality electrics i can find - still not fully decided on the pickups yet, but im leaning towards duncans. best pickups i ever had were duncans, but then ive not tried vast amounts of pickups.
#13
Quote by CobenBlack
ah, thats what i mean - i suppose im asking - how does a pre- amp work - how does it go from being a pickup signal, through a little circuit board, and suddenly become a different sound, just from going through a circuit.

and it should be ok with the pickups, its for a build im going to be doing in a few weeks (guitar made of teak for anyone who's interested) so im getting hold of the best quality electrics i can find - still not fully decided on the pickups yet, but im leaning towards duncans. best pickups i ever had were duncans, but then ive not tried vast amounts of pickups.


Read the passage below.. a preamp is just an amplifier that amplifies a low-level signal by a relatively small amount, ready to be passed to a poweramp, to drive speakers. The voltage output of a guitar is pretty low anyway, and doesn't have to be amplified much with an internal preamp, so the transistors and other magic are few enough in number to fit on a tiny PCB, and only need a 9V power source. I don't really know the specifics, because I've never been into electronics really, but that's how I understand it.

Transistor amplifiers

Main articles: transistor, bipolar junction transistor, Audio amplifier, and MOSFET
The essential role of this active element is to magnify an input signal to yield a significantly larger output signal. The amount of magnification (the "forward gain") is determined by the external circuit design as well as the active device.
Many common active devices in transistor amplifiers are bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs).
Applications are numerous, some common examples are audio amplifiers in a home stereo or PA system, RF high power generation for semiconductor equipment, to RF and Microwave applications such as radio transmitters.
Transistor-based amplifier can be realized using various configurations: for example with a bipolar junction transistor we can realize common base, common collector or common emitter amplifier; using a MOSFET we can realize common gate, common source or common drain amplifier. Each configuration has different characteristic (gain, impedance...).
#15
Quote by VoodooCow229
you already have a gain knob on your guitar. its called the volume control.


Well no, that's just a pot which can add resistance to the signal. When turned up full it's just not offering any resistance. TS wants to actually boost the signal, and their are uses for that, although most players would just dime the amp then adjust the guitar volume.
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E|-------------------------------------------1--
B|-----------------------------------1--4--
G|-------------------------1-3-4--
D|------------------1-3----
A|--------1-2-3----
E|-1-4-----

Just move it around the fretboard