#1
I have an Aria pro II that is pretty old but has new electrics done by me and still plays really nice. However the frets are starting to get worn flat and almost indented in some places particularly in the upper frets. I dont think it would be worth getting it refretted, but I am thinking of scalloping it myself.

I was just wondering if this was a good idea or if I need to get it done proffessionally, I have pretty much all the tools I'd need, the only concern is I have quite a nice rosewood fingerboard that isnt very deep, about 7mm, and I don't want to go all the way through this, so how deep do I need to go?

Any advice welcomed.
Originally posted by Meths
You need serious amounts of therapy.

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#2
Just deep enough so that it is both above the bottom of the fretboard and at a level at which you can comfortably play.
#3
*painful warning sound here*

It could go so terribly wrong. I'm gonna have to tell you (not advise), to get it done professionally. That way, you get the insurance of if THEY **** up, you get some cash, or new frets/new fretboard.
#5
Quote by Mky
Pff. It can't go really wrong if you just keep your attention on what you're doing. You don't have to go deep into the fretboard at all. Follow this guide: http://www.projectguitar.com/tut/scal1.htm.


Heh just on that at the moment, does seem pretty simple, just time consuming, although I was going to just use a file I might try the electric sander.

To what was said about the danger, as long as I'm careful it should be alright as long as I take my time.
Originally posted by Meths
You need serious amounts of therapy.

Quote by jagstang270
One should not try to masturbate while Dragoneforce is in the background
you just can't keep up.

Quote by waylay00
DragonForce? Sounds like some early 90's children's cartoon or action hero lineup.
#6
Buy a chunk of wood, mark depth and fret lines and practice. While it's not necessarily a task for the most elite of luthiers, there's still going to be a learning curve. I suggest practicing on something cheap and expendable rather than tackling your guitar first.

Also, I don't believe scalloping your frets will solve the issue of fret wear - Badly worn frets will cause intonation issues as well is reduced playability. I suggest getting the frets leveled before you scallop it.
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#7
Even if you scallop the fretboard it's not going to solve the problem of uneven or pitted frets so it'd just be a waste of time.
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#8
Quote by steven seagull
Even if you scallop the fretboard it's not going to solve the problem of uneven or pitted frets so it'd just be a waste of time.

+1. Not to mention to need a number of tools and a lot of patience to do it or you'll destroy the frets. I tried it once. I would not recommend you do it unless you've got nothing to loose or are a luthier. Requires more patience and time than most people are going to be willing to put into it to do it right. Not to mention it would make the fact the frets are in crap shape even more apparent.
#9
Scalloping isn't going to fix your problem. Scalloping is done so that you don't hit the board while playing which some people don't like during certain techniques (and only applies to smaller styles of frets).