#1
Where do you go. I'm in a band and we don't know where to look. Will you be asked or do you ask venues. I sound like such a newbie.
hello
#2
talk to bands u no nd ask em to hook u up or ask ppl that u mite no set gigs up nd ask them to hook u up as well. thats how it works over here.
#3
well around where i live (chicago suburbs) you ask the venues via myspace for open slots, and after you play a few times, and you are good enough, they start to ask you for shows.
Quote by Fusanti_RHCP
I have had no problems. Mostly because I am Jesus.
#5
Ah, the UK. Piece of piss to get gigs here.
Pubs, mate. Pubs are the ultimate source of the (good) British band's fanbase and a solid rung on the ladder to a paying career.

Go to any bar that has regular rock nights/open mic sessions and ask if you can have a slot. Most bar owners here will at least give you a chance to prove yourselves. Remember that you need to be a band that attracts customers to a pub, not sends them packing with bleeding ears.

SlackerBabbath is good with this sort of thing. He'll probably pull something useful out of his massive pot of wisdom for you.
#6
Quote by Retro Rocker
Ah, the UK. Piece of piss to get gigs here.
Pubs, mate. Pubs are the ultimate source of the (good) British band's fanbase and a solid rung on the ladder to a paying career.

Go to any bar that has regular rock nights/open mic sessions and ask if you can have a slot. Most bar owners here will at least give you a chance to prove yourselves. Remember that you need to be a band that attracts customers to a pub, not sends them packing with bleeding ears.

SlackerBabbath is good with this sort of thing. He'll probably pull something useful out of his massive pot of wisdom for you.


Yeah, pubs.
Great place to start. Then there's youth clubs and parties for young bands just starting out.
Before you start gigging, get a diary for each member of the band. One of you (and only one) will hold what is called the 'control' diary.
Get everyone to write any dates that they are not available for gigs in their diaries, such as going away on holiday or family occasions or whatever.
At band meetings, like rehearsals for instance, everyone should compare diaries and the dates where someone isn't available goes into the control diary.
The person who holds the control diary is also the person who all the gigs go through. He's the guy who does the ringing around and the guy who's postal address, phone number and e-mail address is given to any potential venues, promoters or agents. (a good agent is worth his weight in gold)
If anyone asks another band member about booking the band, they should refer them to the holder of the control diary.
All this makes it practicaly impossible for you to get double booked or book a date when someone in the band can't make it.

To start with, play anywhere you can, (within reason, if you're a death metal band, you don't wanna be playing at the local geriatric centre) so you'll probably be playing for free, or at least for expenses. The the idea is to gain gigging experience. Rehearsals are OK for learning the songs, but to get good at gigging, you have to play lots of gigs. It's a slightly different discipline.
It's gonna involve a lot of work getting phone numbers of venues (ask a friendly band for their contacts list, or look at a decent local band's gig list on their web site) and ringing around.
The more well known you become, the more phone calls you will recieve off people wanting to book your band and the less time you will have to spend ringing around.

Once you've got a good few gigs under your belt and started to build up a local following, you are now worth something to local promoters/landlords. If you can attract people to their venue, who they can then sell beer to, you will be worth paying. Most places generaly start off at somewhere between £50 and £100.
If you start attracting more people, you want more money.
For instance, in the average sized pub a popular local band that fills the pub can make the pub somewhere between £2000 and £4000 profit, and that's just over the bar, add a door charge and sell them food and this figure can rise dramaticaly.
For this reason, many small places will actualy pay anything up to around £500. Especialy for a band that's a guaranteed draw. So remember, your job, when you are gigging, is, more often than not, basicaly, to sell beer.

Once you've broken the local pub circuit, start branching out into other towns, eventualy, you'll get more of a 'national' name for yourself and find yourself travelling all over the place. Of course, when you travel, try and get the cost of your transportation added to the bill.
You'll eventualy find yourself playing clubs.
Clubs are a little different to pubs, they tend to be bigger for a start, which means more punters, which equals more profits and they almost always have a door charge.
Once you start playing clubs regularly, (if you're the headlining act) you should expect to make at least £50 clear profit for each member of the band.
That's generaly as far as most bands go, you get the odd theatre gig, especialy as a support act for someone bigger (which quite often can mean you starting off playing for practicaly nothing again until you've proven yourself on the theatre circuit) but occasionaly you might get invited to play a theatre that thinks you might be a decent draw on your own or possibly with another act supporting you.
If you can break the theatre circuit, this is where you want to be, it's where all the big money (gig wise) is, but to get to this stage, you need to be either a popular original band or a tribute act. You get very few pub rock cover bands playing theatres (there are exeptions though, The Hamsters come to mind)
Hopefully you will have been recording and selling CDs and other promotional items like t-shirts and badges since the pub days which all goes towards making your name more recognisable, and that my friend is you 'commodity.' The more recognisable your name becomes, the more you'll get paid for gigs.

As you can see, it's a gradual thing, playing to larger and larger venues for more and more money, but in order to make this work, you must remember to stop playing a smaller venue if a larger venue in the same area starts booking you.
Look at it this way, why would someone pay a door charge at a large venue to see you, when they can see you for free in the local pub a few weeks later?
I know it sounds obvious but you wouldn't believe how many bands carry on playing the same venues year in, year out because that's what they are comfortable with, but it can also hold them back.

Hope this lot helps.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jun 19, 2008,
#7
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Yeah, pubs.
Great place to start. Then there's youth clubs and parties for young bands just starting out.
Before you start gigging, get a diary for each member of the band. One of you (and only one) will hold what is called the 'control' diary.
Get everyone to write any dates that they are not available for gigs in their diaries, such as going away on holiday or family occasions or whatever.
At band meetings, like rehearsals for instance, everyone should compare diaries and the dates where someone isn't available goes into the control diary.
The person who holds the control diary is also the person who all the gigs go through. He's the guy who does the ringing around and the guy who's postal address, phone number and e-mail address is given to any potential venues, promoters or agents. (a good agent is worth his weight in gold)
If anyone asks another band member about booking the band, they should refer them to the holder of the control diary.
All this makes it practicaly impossible for you to get double booked or book a date when someone in the band can't make it.

To start with, play anywhere you can, (within reason, if you're a death metal band, you don't wanna be playing at the local geriatric centre) so you'll probably be playing for free, or at least for expenses. The the idea is to gain gigging experience. Rehearsals are OK for learning the songs, but to get good at gigging, you have to play lots of gigs. It's a slightly different discipline.
It's gonna involve a lot of work getting phone numbers of venues (ask a friendly band for their contacts list, or look at a decent local band's gig list on their web site) and ringing around.
The more well known you become, the more phone calls you will recieve off people wanting to book your band and the less time you will have to spend ringing around.

Once you've got a good few gigs under your belt and started to build up a local following, you are now worth something to local promoters/landlords. If you can attract people to their venue, who they can then sell beer to, you will be worth paying. Most places generaly start off at somewhere between £50 and £100.
If you start attracting more people, you want more money.
For instance, in the average sized pub a popular local band that fills the pub can make the pub somewhere between £2000 and £4000 profit, and that's just over the bar, add a door charge and sell them food and this figure can rise dramaticaly.
For this reason, many small places will actualy pay anything up to around £500. Especialy for a band that's a guaranteed draw. So remember, your job, when you are gigging, is, more often than not, basicaly, to sell beer.

Once you've broken the local pub circuit, start branching out into other towns, eventualy, you'll get more of a 'national' name for yourself and find yourself travelling all over the place. Of course, when you travel, try and get the cost of your transportation added to the bill.
You'll eventualy find yourself playing clubs.
Clubs are a little different to pubs, they tend to be bigger for a start, which means more punters, which equals more profits and they almost always have a door charge.
Once you start playing clubs regularly, (if you're the headlining act) you should expect to make at least £50 clear profit for each member of the band.
That's generaly as far as most bands go, you get the odd theatre gig, especialy as a support act for someone bigger (which quite often can mean you starting off playing for practicaly nothing again until you've proven yourself on the theatre circuit) but occasionaly you might get invited to play a theatre that thinks you might be a decent draw on your own or possibly with another act supporting you.
If you can break the theatre circuit, this is where you want to be, it's where all the big money (gig wise) is, but to get to this stage, you need to be either a popular original band or a tribute act. You get very few pub rock cover bands playing theatres (there are exeptions though, The Hamsters come to mind)
Hopefully you will have been recording and selling CDs and other promotional items like t-shirts and badges since the pub days which all goes towards making your name more recognisable, and that my friend is you 'commodity.' The more recognisable your name becomes, the more you'll get paid for gigs.

As you can see, it's a gradual thing, playing to larger and larger venues for more and more money, but in order to make this work, you must remember to stop playing a smaller venue if a larger venue in the same area starts booking you.
Look at it this way, why would someone pay a door charge at a large venue to see you, when they can see you for free in the local pub a few weeks later?
I know it sounds obvious but you wouldn't believe how many bands carry on playing the same venues year in, year out because that's what they are comfortable with, but it can also hold them back.

Hope this lot helps.

Deary me Mr Babbath, I think GOD is a suitable name, and don't deny it.
hello
#9
Quote by opc100
Deary me Mr Babbath, I think GOD is a suitable name, and don't deny it.



It reminds of that line from Monty Python's Life of Brian.

'Oh alright, I am the messiah, I am the messiah.... now f*ck off!'
#11
Quote by Retro Rocker
And where abouts does Slack Babbath stand on this sort of thing, if you don't mind me asking?

How d'yer mean? Gig wise? How far have we got, kinda thing?
#12
Quote by SlackerBabbath
How d'yer mean? Gig wise? How far have we got, kinda thing?

Yeah.
Like, at some point (or still) along the bands history have you been able to fully support yourself from gigging money alone?
#13
Quote by Retro Rocker
Yeah.
Like, at some point (or still) along the bands history have you been able to fully support yourself from gigging money alone?

Yes.
First of all, let me just give you a bit of background.
Slack Babbath formed in late 1999 and spent the next 7 or 8 weeks learning the songs, then we started gigging.
In about 2 years we'd become very tight and were known as the most authentic sounding Sabbath tribute out there. By thi time we'd built up a 5k PA system and a decent light show. By the time another 2 years went past, we were easily earning enough to live off and had just started playing the theatre circuit, sometimes earning as much as £1000 a gig. (check us out on YouTube, there's a bit of film there from The Lochgelly Centre which shows you what kind of places we were playing)
But this takes constant touring and after 4 years of constant touring, it eventualy takes it's toll. We started falling out over silly trivial stuff and suddenly, it wasn't fun anymore because it becomes work and is taken very seriously, so rather than come to blows, we split.
12 months later, we got an offer we really couldn't refuse to reform and headline a local festival. After such a long break, it was suddenly fun again so we decided to stay together but only play the odd gig now and then to keep it fun.
Y'see, even when you're earning, if it ain't fun, it ain't worth doing.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jun 20, 2008,
#14
Aye, good stuff. If I could find a good vocalist I'd love to do an Alice Cooper tribute.
The Iron Man vid you've got on youtube is really good, sounds almost the same as the real thing.

Quote by SlackerBabbath
Y'see, even when you're earning, if it ain't fun, it ain't worth doing.

Yeah, I've heard that's called a real job
But bugger a 'real' job. I'm not allowed to join the Royal Marines, so my future now is in music, no matter what.
#15
Quote by Retro Rocker
Aye, good stuff. If I could find a good vocalist I'd love to do an Alice Cooper tribute.

It's definately a good crack, but it's damn hard work, to get anywhere you have to sound as much like the original as you possibly can, which is actualy a lot harder than doing a cover your own way.
Then there's all the crap you get from 'eliteist' musicians who think that no one should ever play a single cover, let alone be in a tribute band and they call you all sorts of nasty names, even though orchestras play tributes to Mozart and the like without anyone saying a word about it, and impressionists on TV do uncanny impersonations of celebrities without anyone saying a word about it, and what really pisses me off is when it's some 18 year old gobsh!te giving me a hard time, who was still wearing nappies and watching 'Thomas The Tank Engine' when I was out touring with original bands and recording albums.
Quote by Retro Rocker

The Iron Man vid you've got on youtube is really good, sounds almost the same as the real thing.

Cheers.

Quote by Retro Rocker

Yeah, I've heard that's called a real job
But bugger a 'real' job. I'm not allowed to join the Royal Marines, so my future now is in music, no matter what.


Yeah, I said that, until my daughter was born and I needed to make some 'real' money on a regular basis.

Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jun 21, 2008,
#17
DUDE U ROCK !!!!!!!!
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