#1
Ok, I have a Taylor GS8 and the thing is a beauty. The action is great and fast and low until about the 7th fret. As you go down the neck, the action becomes much higher and it isn't easy to play anymore.

I have tried adjusting the tross rod, and even though I have the right tools, I can't seem to move the bolt anymore clockwise (the way I believe I need to move it).

Do I need to file down the bridge? Your thoughts and suggestions are much appreciated. Thanks.
top axes:
Taylor GS8
Fender American Strat (w/DiMarzio pickups)
Epiphone Les Paul
#2
To be honest, I have the same problem, really high action on the higher frets. I thought about fixing it but i decided against it because i love the way it is.

Adjusting your trust rod will reduce the bow but careful when your adjusting it. If you did one whole rotation in the rod, i wouldnt be surprised if it caused a "reverse bow."

Fileing down the bridge could definately help but if you dont do it square itll mess up the action.

What i would do is take it to your guitar repair guy, one you trust, and ask him to fix it. On such a nice guitar i wouldnt have the stones to do it myself.
'85 Fender Reissue '75 Jazz Bass ---> Ashdown MAG300h
Schecter C/SH-1 ---> Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
#3
please stop cranking on your truss rod you may ruin a two thousand dollar guitar take it to a tech preferably a taylor authorized repair facility and get your action set up to your liking. you are a young man and you have many years of playing your (great) music learn how an acoustic setup is different from an electric now and you will be able to tech your guitars for life.
how high is your action, mine was set at 3/32 of an inch at the twelth fret and as far as i am concerened that is a happy meeting ground for string buzz for a hard strummer with so so techniuque (me). now if you are a delicate strummer or have a more refined technuique or are primarily a finger picker then you may be able to go much lower without fret buzz find your happy medium and keep playing acoustic your electric chops will get bettor as well . good luck and enjoy your very nice guitar.
#4
I have a problem with my action too...

I'M NOT GETTING ANY
My God, it's full of stars!
#5
I love the last two posts.
top axes:
Taylor GS8
Fender American Strat (w/DiMarzio pickups)
Epiphone Les Paul
#6
I have tried adjusting the tross rod, and even though I have the right tools, I can't seem to move the bolt anymore clockwise (the way I believe I need to move it).


You've tightened it as much as it will go. Give it a turn counter clockwise to relieve that tension then follow anita_prs_bad's advice.

Fileing down the bridge could definately help but if you dont do it square itll mess up the action.


Both yourself and the threadstarter are confusing bridge with saddle.
#7
Quote by Dreadnought
I have a problem with my action too...

I'M NOT GETTING ANY



That could be an issue with either a) your nut(s), or b) your rod (truss?)
I'd suggest you either go bigger or try to get the rod to firm up. Tightening it won't work tho.
Last edited by LeftyDave at Jun 21, 2008,
#8
No, I'm pretty sure I haven't tightened it all the way. Turning it counter-clockwise is just as difficult, and I am using a 1/4" nut driver (the tool which taylor trussrods require). When I get a chance in a week or so, I'll take it up to a good shop.
top axes:
Taylor GS8
Fender American Strat (w/DiMarzio pickups)
Epiphone Les Paul
#9
Noah, just an FYI, but my post above was directed at Dreadnought.
A bit of learning is required on your part I'd say. You've fallen into the same pit as many other people have when it comes to the almighty truss rod and it's function in an acoustic guitar. It's not an action adjusting point, and should never, ever be thought of as one. It's sole purpose is to provide tension on the neck opposite that of the pull of the strings to maintain the correct geometry of the neck.
The two primary action adjustment points are 1) the bridge saddle and 2) the nut.
In your original post, you said that the guitar plays beautifully, and has nice low action, until you get up around the 7th fret or so, and then onward to the highest frets.
In my opinion, there's nothing wrong with the guitar. The strings need to have a greater amount of clearance near the body than they do near the nut in order for them to vibrate cleanly, and so that you don't fret out as you move up the neck. All guitars have this string angle to them. As do violins, cellos, basses...Get my drift?
If you can manage to return the truss rod back to where it was before you cranked on it, then please do so. It'll save you some cash for a setup that you most likely don't need.
For future reference, truss rods may need adjusting perhaps 2 times a year and those would be when you get the major changes in climate, such as from the dry winter air into the spring/summer months, then back again from those hot/humid months to the dryness of winter again. As the wood swells/shrinks with the changes in climate, the neck relief will change too. Also, the truss rod is only effective along the playable portion of the fretboard, i.e; from the nut to the body of the guitar, and primarily in the center of that area, around frets 7-9. The truss rod won't change the string height over the 20th fret, nor will it change it over the 1st.
#10
No, I'm pretty sure I haven't tightened it all the way. Turning it counter-clockwise is just as difficult, and I am using a 1/4" nut driver


Sounds like it needs a bit of lubrication.