#1
Hi ...

How do you transpose a Minor to a power chord ? ..

For example for the following chord progression C Am F G ,

C F and G can be replaced by C5 F5 and G5 , but what do you replace Am with ?
#3
Amin power chord

e----
B----
G----
D----
A--3-
E--5-

it would just be your perfect prime and your minor 3rd. it is called a minor diad

Amajor

e----
B----
G----
D----
A--4-
E--5-

this is a major diad the perfect prime and the major 3rd

and obviously the 5th power chord

e----
B----
G----
D----
A--7-
E--5-

which to me act as more of a sus chord giving no major or minor tonality
Last edited by lbc_sublime at Jun 20, 2008,
#4
Quote by lbc_sublime
Amin power chord

e----
B----
G----
D----
A--3-
E--5-

it would just be your perfect prime and your minor 3rd


WRONG!!!!!!!!!!

Just A5^^
#5
For a power chord you want root and 5th.

A5 (powerchord):

---------------------------------
---------------------------------
---------------------------------
---------------------------------
-------7--------------------------
-------5--------------------------
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by cryzhadry
WRONG!!!!!!!!!!

Just A5^^



it's called a diad and a power chord is more of a sus chord to me

diads to add are used alot in metal and are useful regardless of what this guy says

those 3 chords i showed are very useful together especially with a lot of gain
#8
Quote by cryzhadry
WRONG!!!!!!!!!!

Just A5^^




Agreed. Power chords don't really let you express major or minor because it only has a third and a fifth.
#9
Quote by Landon54
Agreed. Power chords don't really let you express major or minor because it only has a third and a fifth.



i think you mean root and fifth
#10
Quote by Landon54
Agreed. Power chords don't really let you express major or minor because it only has a third and a fifth.

Before you call someone else wrong, make sure you're at least correct yourself.
#11
Quote by pepperfunk
oh yeah and wouldn't those two note power chords be intervals?

A5 interval?
E------ E-----
B------ B-----
G------ G-----
D--7-- D-----
A--7-- A--7--
E--5-- E--5--

A power chord is an interval, not a chord (despite the name). You've listed the same chord twice, except that in the first the A is repeated an octave up. Both are A5, however.
#12
if your gonna use power chords those 3 shapes are very useful 5th chords alone can get boring when used to often

but thats just what i think.
#13
Quote by lbc_sublime
it's called a diad and a power chord is more of a sus chord to me

diads to add are used alot in metal and are useful regardless of what this guy says

those 3 chords i showed are very useful together especially with a lot of gain


A power chord is kinda of like a sus chord in that the tonality is ambiguous, but a sus chord must have a 2nd or 4th in place of the third.

Don't get them confused, a power chord is most definitely not a sus chord.
#15
wow.... best thread of the day. The guy poses a good question. Diads, two notes played at once, sound pretty good distorted. To carry over the minor tonality you'll have to have that minor 3rd, which isn't the wrong way to go if you know what you're doing.
#16
The only problem with using the third, however, is muddiness. This is the reason power chords sound so good; because of the harmonic relationship of the third with the rest of the chord, the sound of that specific tone tends to "fog up" if you will and won't sound as good (or clear) as the root or the fifth.
#19
Quote by :-D
The only problem with using the third, however, is muddiness. This is the reason power chords sound so good; because of the harmonic relationship of the third with the rest of the chord, the sound of that specific tone tends to "fog up" if you will and won't sound as good (or clear) as the root or the fifth.


that's true, that's why I said you have to play it right, just look at Tool, they play a lot of very weird intervals in weird spots, but make it sound good by how and when it's played.

And I'm not making fun of anyone, I just find the arguing a little humorous and it lightened up my day.
#20
cool it is hard to tell without context

but i find if you have real good tone it won't sound muddy

but i was taught those for moveable shapes in metal you bearly ever hit your high stings in chords i personally find, but i could be wrong depending on the band or music you guys make
#21
T/S: A5......a power chord consist of the root and the fifth.....since it hasnt got a third it cant really tell wether its major or minor on its own......

Edit: To find out if a power chord is major or minor in a chord progression you would have to find out the key of the progression.

PLZ correct me if im wrong ppl.
Last edited by MAMADERA2000 at Jun 21, 2008,