#1
So, anyone here has developed this skill?

I downloaded a bunch of lessons discs by David Lucas Burge, and according to what he says, I have perfect pitch, but it's not developed yet, or as his words say, "It's on its infant stage".

So, for those of you who have this skill, how did you develop it? and what are the differences in hearing now with it than without?
#2
I have it, though some tell me it's relative pitch because I was not born with it, which I disagree with. All I did was sit in choir and begin to associate words with specific pitches; I remembered these and slowly built up a memory for it, and now I just give and name pitches without any thought.

Hearing now is interesting because I annoy everybody by giving them pitches of everything that's going on around us.
#4
Quote by :-D
I have it, though some tell me it's relative pitch because I was not born with it, which I disagree with. All I did was sit in choir and begin to associate words with specific pitches; I remembered these and slowly built up a memory for it, and now I just give and name pitches without any thought.

Hearing now is interesting because I annoy everybody by giving them pitches of everything that's going on around us.


how long have you been playing guitar/ been a musician?
#5
Quote by RCalisto
how long have you been playing guitar/ been a musician?

Playing guitar and studying music seriously, 11 months. I was in choir a couple year before that though and I played bass for a bit.
#6
seriously you mean like 'nerd' ? :P
i don't have even 2 years of guitar experience but feel nowhere near the perfect pitch
i don't train that aural thingy either which is quite stupid from me.. should get that going
#7
Perhaps "nerd" level, yes; it was just something I was really passionate about and I worked my ass of at it. That's the guitar and study of theory. The perfect pitch I didn't work at as hard, it mainly evolved over the span of a few months.
#8
Just as a caution, I wouldn't spend money on any course that purports to teach you absolute pitch. Scientists and musicians have been trying to teach people perfect pitch for 100 years. If there was a system that definitively WORKED, it would be plastered all over the place.
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#9
As far as I know you are either born with perfect pitch or not. I believe that =p was born with it and developed/honed the skill on his own through chorus practices.

If I were you I would just work on developing relative pitch, an invaluable skill to have as well for those of us that weren't blessed with absolute pitch.
#10
Quote by Paquijón
As far as I know you are either born with perfect pitch or not. I believe that =p was born with it and developed/honed the skill on his own through chorus practices.

If I were you I would just work on developing relative pitch, an invaluable skill to have as well for those of us that weren't blessed with absolute pitch.

You spelled my name wrong!

Anyway, one of the things I'm working on is relative pitch. At this point, I hear an interval and say to myself, "that's an E, that's a G#. It's a major third." I'd like to be at the point where I can correctly hear intervals without assigning them absolute pitches.
#11
Quote by :-D
You spelled my name wrong!

Anyway, one of the things I'm working on is relative pitch. At this point, I hear an interval and say to myself, "that's an E, that's a G#. It's a major third." I'd like to be at the point where I can correctly hear intervals without assigning them absolute pitches.


Sorry :-D!

That's really interesting to me that you have to work on relative pitch... I never really thought someone with perfect pitch would have to learn intervals like everyone else up until now... I just thought they could do it as easily as they could name pitches.
#12
That's a common problem for people with perfect pitch. Because they can hear the exact notes, they don't usually develop a good sense of relative pitch. This makes it hard to learn relative intervals and transpose music.
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#13
Quote by Free to Guitar
That's a common problem for people with perfect pitch. Because they can hear the exact notes, they don't usually develop a good sense of relative pitch. This makes it hard to learn relative intervals and transpose music.

Yep, exactly. Transposing kicks my ass every time.
#14
I downloaded that lucas burge thing as well. His marketing strategy does make it seem like a scam and he blabs on and on about redundant **** on his tapes but I've been doing the exercises anyway and this morning I woke up and I tried to sing an F# without hearing any notes beforehand and I hit it perfectly.... maybe it was a freak incident.
#15
Quote by :-D
I have it, though some tell me it's relative pitch because I was not born with it, which I disagree with. All I did was sit in choir and begin to associate words with specific pitches; I remembered these and slowly built up a memory for it, and now I just give and name pitches without any thought.

Hearing now is interesting because I annoy everybody by giving them pitches of everything that's going on around us.

they're right, you dont have it. sorry but you cant have perfect pitch. there are way too many notes in between notes that we just cannot hear. you just have very good relative pitch which is what you see all those programs teach. they just call it perfect pitch. there comes a point though when you relative pitch can be very good and it seems like you are perfect.
#16
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
they're right, you dont have it. sorry but you cant have perfect pitch. there are way too many notes in between notes that we just cannot hear. you just have very good relative pitch which is what you see all those programs teach. they just call it perfect pitch. there comes a point though when you relative pitch can be very good and it seems like you are perfect.

All of the evidence he's provided has proved that he does have a form of perfect pitch, whether he was born with it or not. And I think it's ****ing cool!

I guess it would be harder to learn one if you are already proficient/ have the other. Like if you were born with perfect pitch, it would make it rather challenging to learn relative pitch well. Or if you were really good with relative pitch, and then joined a choir and attempted to learn the notes, it would probably be a lot harder.

I know whenever I hear notes/ intervals, I think the interval first, then notice the note name.
#17
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
they're right, you dont have it. sorry but you cant have perfect pitch. there are way too many notes in between notes that we just cannot hear. you just have very good relative pitch which is what you see all those programs teach. they just call it perfect pitch. there comes a point though when you relative pitch can be very good and it seems like you are perfect.

So you're saying that there is no such thing as perfect pitch? Even if this was how we thought about it, the ability known as perfect pitch is what I have.
#18
exactly. it's an ability, not a talent. perfect pitch is just a technique which is able to be developed as any other musician technique or even guitar technique. i start without being able to do legato, i practice and i become able to. i start without knowing the notes, listen carefully, and go go practice machine!
it involves hear training and memorizing more than anything else.